by the way i am completely aware that there is just one picture that's not from the set of go on

  • what she says: I'm fine
  • what she means: i can't believe people actually ship nancy with jonathan, because that completely goes against what the writers are trying to do. they set up your basic trope: good girl is trying to be #edgy and is dating your stereotypical "bad boy", and then this "nice guy" comes along and pays attention to her. listen, jonathan is great and all, but i don't trust pretentious creeps that like to take pictures of girls making out with their boyfriends in privacy without anyone's permission. jonathan also tried to put nancy in this box. "you were trying to be someone else." the writers totally destroyed the idea of nancy simply being that straight A student that wants to rebel. she's not dating steve, or drinking, or shooting guns because she thinks she's being "different". she's doing those things because THAT'S WHO SHE IS. you can get straight A's and want to do well in school while also partying and dating a hunk. speaking of the hunk, steve is actually wayyy better for her than jonathan (i mean i'd be happy if nancy decided not to be with anyone but let's be real i'm a total stevexnancy person) and here's why: he paid attention to her, like really noticed things about her. he didn't make fun of who she was in a condescending way, and he also supports her. like, yes, he's problematic in that he has shitty friends and horrible parents (from what we've heard) and while his initial decisions are rude and selfish, he becomes self-aware and tries to make it up to people. i.e., going to jonathan's to try and apologize and buying him a new camera, or coming to nancy to tell her he confessed to the police even though it got him in trouble, or telling his friends where to stick it and then going to help wash off the graffiti. in short, jonathan romanticized this version of nancy that wasn't really all of who she was and people paint him to be this great guy (would you trust a guy that took pictures of you without you knowing, and then only feeling guilty once you found out?) and steve is this beautiful work in progress that wants to understand how nancy works as a person. so basically the fact that the writers didn't leave nancy with jonathan means that they destroyed that basic story line where the "nice girl" leaves the "bad boy" for the "nice guy" and they did it in the best way possible without completely bashing any one character and i just really love this show.
‘You should be nice to me...its my birthday.’

A Choi Seunghyun fanfiction

Type: Heavy smut.

A/N: Just a smutty drabble for T.O.P’s birthday- Happy Birthday Old man! :D Enjoy!

Inspired by this image:

‘What are you doing?’

You cant help but bite your lip as you hide behind his phone, angling it up slightly to get the right frame and pressing the button to take a picture, proceeding to tap the little circle a few more times as you grin to yourself, and completely forgetting he’d even asked you a question.

‘Jagi…’

Your heart is racing in your chest at just how beautiful he was; the way the light bounced perfectly off of his cheekbones, the way his eyes glistened in the room’s mood lighting, the way his lips were curling up in a smirk as he watched you through the screen of your phone.

‘…Are you taking pictures of me again?’ 

Keep reading

  • Ghira: Alright, now listen. Sienna Khan is a strong terrifying leader. She will only show respect when given it so be on your best behavior. That means no rude comments and Speak. Only. When. Spoken. To. Is that understood? *Ghira said as He, Blake, and Sun are lead down an old street to a large abandon building.*
  • Sun: Why do I feel like that was only directed at me? *Sun whispered to Blake.*
  • Blake: It was. *Blake informed him.*
  • Sun: Well, that is just rude. *He frowned while Blake looked at him with a raised eyebrow.* ... Fair enough.
  • Blake: Look don't take it personally. Sienna Khan is the reason why the White Fang became violate in the first place. She is a firm believer in the only the strongest survive and is the one that started the grim mask.
  • Sun: Wait. Seriously? I thought is was, uh, you know who.
  • Blake: *Blake frown knowing who Sun was talking about as her cat ears drooped down.* It's true Adam was the one that made all of the white fang under him start wearing the mask but it was originally to show that he was her pupil.
  • Sun: So then that means...
  • Blake: Sienna Khan trained Adam to be the killer he is today. *Blake sadly admitted then felt Sun place a comforting hand on her shoulder.*
  • Sun: It's not your fault. That dumbass made his own choice and now he is going to be in for a big surprise when we are here to kick his ass.
  • Blake: If he tries to attack Sienna Khan directly.
  • Ghira: Which I doubt young Adam is that foolish. Sienna Khan is a fierce warrior and won't hesitate to kill anyone who challenges her. Even I had few... close calls with her. *Ghira frowns rubbing his side.*
  • Sun: Yeah but you still won right?
  • Ghira: Of course.
  • Blake: Weren't you in the hospital for three days after your last fight with her?
  • Ghira: It was a luck shoot!
  • Sun: Soooo, not to change topics about the possile butt whoopings you may or may not have gotten. *Sun slowly started as Ghira glared at his.* But What kind of Faunus is she? Is she a tiger? A lizard?
  • Blake: I'm... not really sure to be honest with you. *Blake muttered.*
  • Sun: What?! How could you not know what kind of Faunus she is after working for her for so long? *Sun asked with surprise.*
  • Blake: I rarely meet her and every time I did she always wore her grim mask hiding her face. Sienna khan isn't even her real name.
  • Sun: And THAT didn't immediately set off a few red flags when you let her take over. *At this Blake and Ghira both stop to Glare at Sun who held his ground as he crossed his arms.*
  • Blake: ... Point taken.
  • Ghira: Fair enough. *He and Blake admitted as they entered the building the leader of the White Fang has made her base.* However to be fair she only started to wear it when I and Kali had decided to take of as leader of Menagerie.
  • Rhino Faunus: Ahem. Excuse me for interrupting. *The rhino faunus cleared his throat, getting the attention of the Belladonnas and Sun.* Please wait here. I shall inform Sienna Khan that you have arrived.
  • Ghira: Very well. Thank you.
  • Rhino Faunus: My pleasure. It is the least I can do for you and your daughter. *The Rhino faunus bowed and walked off.*
  • Sun: ... He seems nice.
  • Blake: He is. He was my babysitter when little.
  • Sun: He was!?
  • Ghira: He was. Blake used to use his horn as a scratching post.
  • Blake: Dad!
  • Sun: That poor man.
  • Blake: Sun!
  • Ghira: Anyway, as for Sienna Khan's Faunus heritage, she is from an old bloodline of Faunus. One which allows them to either shows fully what they are or hides it completely.
  • Sun: What's that mean?
  • Blake: *Blake shrugs* It's only a myth. A clan of Faunus that-
  • Rhino Faunus: Sienna Khan will see you now. *The Faunus interrupted as he reemerged from the room which he enter before stepping aside to hold the door for them.*
  • Ghira: *Ghira nodded and looked back at Blake and Sun.* Are you both ready? *The two nodded and followed Ghira as they made their way into Sienna Khan's room lit by candles and a fire place. Once inside Blake and Sun quickly noticed dozens of maps of different kingdoms, Schnee dust minds and factories, leaders of anti-faunus groups with some that are crossed out, even photos of other white fang members, and what catch Blake's attention a small framed picture of half a picture.*
  • Blake: That's Photo. *Blake thought to herself.* They look almost like...
  • Sienna Khan: It's been a long time hasn't it, Ghira? *Sienna Khun spoke causing Ghira, Blake, and Sun to quickly turned to the fire place. There two chairs, open empty and the other that's back faced them where taken that shows a red armored gauntlet rest upon the arm rest, sat in front of the fire with a small table in between them where a large Grimm mask laid next to a small glass.* What bring you back? If its about what happened at Beacon, It's being taken care of if you haven't already received the plans on dealing with my pupil.
  • Ghira: Actually, this visit is to warn you about your pupil Sienna Khan. *The former leader of the white fang started taking a step towards it new leader.* Aside from leading that attack on Beacon, twisting what the White Fang stands for, and even sending his followers to track down and on my daughter. He plans on attempting to over throw you and taking over the White Fang.
  • Sienna Khan: Yes. I am aware of this. *She told them, reaching for the glass of liquor.* As well as the order that Adam has told his followers to track and find your daughter.
  • Ghira: You are aware of this? *Ghira questioned in a low almost threatening tone.* You were aware of the spies in Menagerie? You were aware that one of them attacked my daughter and nearly killed her friend?! You were aware that my daughter was endanger and you didn't think of warning me!?
  • Sienna Khan: *The leader of the white fang pauses while lifting her glass, Blake's ears picking up the sound of her turning her head towards her father.* The Towers are down Ghira. By the time I learned about Adam's obsession with your daughter, Whom I remind you betrayed him and broke his heart, *Ghira and Blake both notice a hint of frustration in her tone.* I received your message of wanting to speak with me. Which is why I will deal with it.
  • Ghira: Which is why I will be PERSONALLY be assisting you and the white fang hunt him and his follower down. *Ghira told her crossing his arms before Sienna Khan slammed her glass on the table hard startling Blake and Sun.*
  • Sienna Khan: You seemed to misunderstood me, Ghira. You may help our people find his followers to restore our tribes good name. But I will be dealing with MY pupil. Personally. *She told them, in a very threatening manner. However, to Ghira and Sun's surprise, cause Blake to step forward.*
  • Blake: Then I am going with you.
  • Sun: Wait What!?
  • Ghira: Blake. No.
  • Sienna Khan: Blake?
  • Blake: Adam was my partner. He was a friend... I have to take responsibility and stop him. *Blake begins.* It's my fault he is like how he is. It's my fault that he has become the monster he is now. It's my fault that now everyone I care about is in danger. It's my fault that the one I... The one I love lost so much... I need to make things right. *There was a moment of silence Sun and Ghira seeing the determination is the young huntress's eyes. Then to all of their surprise Sienna Khan rose from her chair as she spoke.*
  • Sienna Khan: Sure.
  • Ghira: Sienna Khan! *snapped as his successor as she reach for her dust blades sword.*
  • Sienna Khan: You can drop the title Ghira. I won't be doing this hunt with you daughter as Sienna Khan. Beside, *Sienna Khan said, turning to face Blake and Sun watching as an expression shock washes over their faces and stared right into Blake's eyes with her red.*
  • Sun: No way...
  • Blake: I don't believe it... You're... You're...
  • Raven Branwen: We have a lot to talk about.
Tumblrs Guide to: What To Do in Case of an Auto Accident

As Tumblr’s self proclaimed Auto Insurance Claims adjuster, I am here to help everyone know what to do in case you are in an accident. I am currently an Injury Claims Adjuster for a large auto insurance company. I’ve been doing this for going on four years now. I spent over 2 years just handling total loss vehicles. I also handle arbitration hearings where I make the final fault determination on a disputed claim between two other insurance companies. Trust me, I know what I am doing.

I truly hope you are never in an accident. But it happens to the best of us.  Here is my guide to what to do if you should ever be in the wrong place at the wrong time and in an accident.

•Stay calm.

Accidents happen to the best of us. Even myself as a claims adjuster I’ve been in an accident while employed by my company. 99.9% of accidents are just that, accidents. They don’t happen because someone has a vendetta against you. Stay calm. Don’t get angry. Don’t yell. If you stay in a normal mood then the situation will stay manageable. Keeping a normal mood helps you stay in control of the situation. I am aware that just because you are calm doesn’t mean the other parties will be calm, if they aren’t calm, and you are in a safe spot, stay in your car (if its safe to do so) or someplace else separate for them and wait for the police. 


•Make sure you and your passengers are OK.

This is important, are you okay? Adrenaline is probably pumping and your heart is thumping, but stop and take a moment to calm down. Are you okay? If you or your passengers are in pain, bloody, have loss of consciousness, call 911. Its better to have an ambulance there to check you out and leave than to assume its okay and the pain will go away. Remember, you can replace cars, you can replace belongings, but you can’t replace people.


•Move as far off the roadway as possible, but stay at the scene of the accident. 

If your car is moveable, its always best to move it off the roadway. I know you might want to preserve where you are so the police can see, but your safety and others safety is always number one priority. Warn oncoming traffic by activating your hazard warning lights and/or setting flares, and if its dark, get to a location where traffic can easily see you. Don’t park it on a hill in the dark, and if you have to, make sure all your lights are on and hazard lights are on. If possible, have someone direct or warn traffic up ahead if its hard to see the accident scene in the dark. Again, your safety and others safety is number one priority. You can replace cars, you can’t replace people!

•Call the police.

Call 911 or the appropriate emergency number to report the accident. Sometimes police will not come out if its a non injury accident or if all the cars are moveable. If one party does not have insurance or a drivers licenses, defiantly call the cops.  They will come out for those situations, even if its a minor fender bender. My best philosophy, always call the police and let them tell you if they will or will not show up. Don’t assume. 

•NEVER admit fault.

I do not care if you rear ended someone, or hit a parked car. Do not discuss the car accident with the other parties involved in the accident, best advice is don’t discuss with anyone other than the police, and your claims representative. Always keep in mind, your insurance company determines fault. The police don’t even determine fault, they determine who broke the law, and who might contribute to the accident. And fault is defiantly not based on someone saying it was their fault at the scene. Your insurance claims adjuster is trained to look at the accident at all angles. Just because you made a left turn in front of someone and they hit you doesn’t mean you are completely at fault. Every driver has a duty to avoid an accident, and you can’t cause an accident to avoid an accident. Just let the pro’s determine whose at fault. 

•Exchange information with the other driver involved in the car accident.

Best advice I can ever give you, USE THAT CELL PHONE YOU HAVE IN YOUR HANDS AND DOCUMENT DOCUMENT DOCUMENT. Take pictures of all vehicles, license plates, drivers license, insurance cards. Don’t just write it down, take pictures.  Take pictures of all the cars, try to get a picture of all four angles that way your adjuster, if needed, can see all aspects of the damages. And while you are at it, take a picture of where it happened. Write down the name, address, phone number and license numbers for all drivers and witnesses, particularly those who were not riding in a vehicle involved in the accident. Ask for the insurance companies and policy numbers for drivers involved in the car accident. 

•Contact your insurance company and report the claim.

Don’t wait for the other party to do it. Step up, be an adult, and do it yourself. The idea that insurance companies are big bad people is a myth. Our job is to protect you. We can’t do that if you don’t tell us about an accident. Even if you are not at fault, report it. It can come back to bite you in the butt. The whole idea of not wanting your insurance company to know is a joke. We will know. Once a claim is filed with your information, it goes into a database called CLUE or Lexis Nexis. and we will know about it come renewal time. Thats why its always best we find out from you than from another source. The sooner your insurance company knows about the accident, the sooner they can start working to resolve your claim. Again if you aren’t at fault, then in most cases, it won’t affect you rates wise. Check with your agent or company to see how they handle not at fault accidents. But again, your insurance job is to protect you. You pay them lots of money to protect you, and to help you when you have an accident. We are the experts and we are here to guide you. You don’t have accidents everyday, neither do we as adjusters, but we do help people move forward from them every day. Trust us! Once you call them and report the claim, don’t stop there, cooperate with your adjuster. Give a statement, tell them what happened, ask them questions. Don’t just think its done once you call it in, they will let you know once the claim is done and they don’t need anything else from you. 

Conrad Knickerbocker, Interview: William S. Burroughs, 35 The Paris Review (1965)
  • Interviewer: When and why did you start to write?
  • William S. Burroughs: I started to write in about 1950; I was thirty-five at the time; there didn't seem to be any strong motivation. I simply was endeavoring to put down in a more or less straightforward journalistic style something about my experiences with addiction and addicts.
  • Interviewer: Why did you start taking drugs?
  • William S. Burroughs: Well, I was just bored. I didn't seem to have much interest in becoming a successful advertising executive or whatever, or living the kind of life Harvard designs for you. After I became addicted in New York in 1944, things began to happen. I got in some trouble with the law, got married, moved to New Orleans, and then went to Mexico.
  • Interviewer: There seems to be a great deal of middle-class voyeurism in this country concerning addiction, and in the literary world, downright reverence for the addict. You apparently don't share these points of view.
  • William S. Burroughs: No, most of it is nonsense. I think drugs are interesting principally as chemical means of altering metabolism and thereby altering what we call reality, which I would define as a more or less constant scanning pattern.
  • Interviewer: What do you think of the hallucinogens and the new psychedelic drugs—LSD-25?
  • William S. Burroughs: I think they're extremely dangerous, much more dangerous than heroin. They can produce overwhelming anxiety states. I've seen people try to throw themselves out of windows; whereas the heroin addict is mainly interested in staring at his own toe. Other than deprivation of the drug, the main threat to him is an overdose. I've tried most of the hallucinogens without an anxiety reaction, fortunately. LSD-25 produced results for me similar to mescaline. Like all hallucinogens, LSD gave me an increased awareness, more a hallucinated viewpoint than any actual hallucination. You might look at a doorknob and it will appear to revolve, although you are conscious that this is the result of the drug. Also, van Goghish colors, with all those swirls, and the crackle of the universe.
  • Interviewer: Have you read Henri Michaux's book on mescaline?
  • William S. Burroughs: His idea was to go into his room and close the door and hold in the experiences. I had my most interesting experiences with mescaline when I got outdoors and walked around—colors, sunsets, gardens. It produces a terrible hangover, though, nasty stuff. It makes one ill and interferes with coordination. I've had all the interesting effects I need, and I don't want any repetition of those extremely unpleasant physical reactions.
  • Interviewer: The visions of drugs and the visions of art don't mix?
  • William S. Burroughs: Never. The hallucinogens produce visionary states, sort of, but morphine and its derivatives decrease awareness of inner processes, thoughts, and feelings. They are painkillers, pure and simple. They are absolutely contraindicated for creative work, and I include in the lot alcohol, morphine, barbiturates, tranquilizers—the whole spectrum of sedative drugs. As for visions and heroin, I had a hallucinatory period at the very beginning of addiction, for instance, a sense of moving at high speed through space. But as soon as addiction was established, I had no visions—vision—at all and very few dreams.
  • Interviewer: Why did you stop taking drugs?
  • William S. Burroughs: I was living in Tangier in 1957, and I had spent a month in a tiny room in the Casbah staring at the toe of my foot. The room had filled up with empty Eukodol cartons; I suddenly realized I was not doing anything. I was dying. I was just apt to be finished. So I flew to London and turned myself over to Dr. John Yerbury Dent for treatment. I'd heard of his success with the apomorphine treatment. Apomorphine is simply morphine boiled in hydrochloric acid; it's nonaddictive. What the apomorphine did was to regulate my metabolism. It's a metabolic regulator. It cured me physiologically. I'd already taken the cure once at Lexington, and although I was off drugs when I got out, there was a physiological residue. Apomorphine eliminated that. I've been trying to get people in this country interested in it, but without much luck. The vast majority—social workers, doctors—have the cop's mentality toward addiction. A probation officer in California wrote me recently to inquire about the apomorphine treatment. I'll answer him at length. I always answer letters like that.
  • Interviewer: Have you had any relapses?
  • William S. Burroughs: Yes, a couple. Short. Both were straightened out with apomorphine, and now heroin is no temptation for me. I'm just not interested. I've seen a lot of it around. I know people who are addicts. I don't have to use any willpower. Dr. Dent always said there is no such thing as willpower. You've got to reach a state of mind in which you don't want it or need it.
  • Interviewer: You regard addiction as an illness but also a central human fact, a drama?
  • William S. Burroughs: Both, absolutely. It's as simple as the way in which anyone happens to become an alcoholic. They start drinking, that's all. They like it, and they drink, and then they become alcoholic. I was exposed to heroin in New York—that is, I was going around with people who were using it; I took it; the effects were pleasant. I went on using it and became addicted. Remember that if it can be readily obtained, you will have any number of addicts. The idea that addiction is somehow a psychological illness is, I think, totally ridiculous. It's as psychological as malaria. It's a matter of exposure. People, generally speaking, will take any intoxicant or any drug that gives them a pleasant effect if it is available to them. In Iran, for instance, opium was sold in shops until quite recently, and they had three million addicts in a population of twenty million. There are also all forms of spiritual addiction. Anything that can be done chemically can be done in other ways, that is, if we have sufficient knowledge of the processes involved. Many policemen and narcotics agents are precisely addicted to power, to exercising a certain nasty kind of power over people who are helpless. The nasty sort of power-- white junk, I call it—rightness; they're right, right, right—and if they lost that power, they would suffer excruciating withdrawal symptoms. The picture we get of the whole Russian bureaucracy, people who are exclusively preoccupied with power and advantage, this must be an addiction. Suppose they lose it? Well, it's been their whole life.
  • Interviewer: Can you amplify your idea of junk as image?
  • William S. Burroughs: It's only a theory and, I feel, an inadequate one. I don't think anyone really understands what a narcotic is or how it works, how it kills pain. My idea is sort of a stab in the dark. As I see it, what has been damaged in pain is, of course, the image, and morphine must in some sense replace this. We know it blankets the cells and that addicts are practically immune to certain viruses, to influenza and respiratory complaints. This is simple because the influenza virus has to make a hole in the cell receptors. When those are covered, as they are in morphine addiction, the virus can't get in. As soon as morphine is withdrawn, addicts will immediately come down with colds and often with influenza.
  • Interviewer: Certain schizophrenics also resist respiratory disease.
  • William S. Burroughs: A long time ago I suggested there were similarities in terminal addiction and terminal schizophrenia. That was why I made the suggestion that they addict these people to heroin, then withdraw it and see if they could be motivated; in other words, find out whether they'd walk across the room and pick up a syringe. Needless to say, I didn't get very far, but I think it would be interesting.
  • Interviewer: Narcotics, then, disturb normal perception—
  • William S. Burroughs: And set up instead a random craving for images. If drugs weren't forbidden in America, they would be the perfect middle-class vice. Addicts would do their work and come home to consume the huge dose of images awaiting them in the mass media. Junkies love to look at television. Billie Holiday said she knew she was going off drugs when she didn't like to watch TV. Or they'll sit and read a newspaper or magazine, and by God, read it all. I knew this old junkie in New York, and he'd go out and get a lot of newspapers and magazines and some candy bars and several packages of cigarettes and then he'd sit in his room and he'd read those newspapers and magazines right straight through. Indiscriminately. Every word.
  • Interviewer: Marshall McLuhan said that you believed heroin was needed to turn the human body into an environment that includes the universe. But from what you've told me, you're not at all interested in turning the body into an environment.
  • William S. Burroughs: No, junk narrows consciousness. The only benefit to me as a writer (aside from putting me into contact with the whole carny world) came to me after I went off it. What I want to do is to learn to see more of what's out there, to look outside, to achieve as far as possible a complete awareness of surroundings. Beckett wants to go inward. First he was in a bottle and now he is in the mud. I am aimed in the other direction—outward.
  • Interviewer: Mary McCarthy has commented on the carnival origins of your characters in Naked Lunch. What are their other derivations?
  • William S. Burroughs: The carny world was the one I exactly intended to create—a kind of midwestern, small-town, cracker-barrel, pratfall type of folklore, very much my own background. That world was an integral part of America and existed nowhere else, at least not in the same form. My family was southern on my mother's side. My grandfather was a circuit-riding Methodist minister with thirteen children. Most of them went up to New York and became quite successful in advertising and public relations. One of them, an uncle, was a master image maker, Ivy Lee, Rockefeller's publicity manager.
  • Interviewer: Earlier you mentioned that if junk had done nothing else, it at least put you in contact with the carny world.
  • William S. Burroughs: Yes, the underworld, the old-time thieves, pickpockets, and people like that. They're a dying race; very few of those old-timers left. Yeah, well, they were show business.
  • Interviewer: What's the difference between the modern junkie versus the 1944 junkie?
  • William S. Burroughs: For one thing, all these young addicts; that was quite unknown in 1944. Most of the ones I knew were middle-aged men or old. I knew some of the old-time pickpockets and sneak thieves and shortchange artists. They had something called The Bill, a shortchange deal. I've never been able to figure out how it works. One man I knew beat all the cashiers in Grand Central with this thing. It starts with a twenty-dollar bill. You give them a twenty-dollar bill and then when you get the change you say, “Well, wait a minute, I must have been dreaming, I've got the change after all.” First thing you know, the cashier's short ten dollars. One day this shortchange artist went to Grand Central, even though he knew it was burned down, but he wanted to change twenty dollars. Well, a guy got on the buzzer and they arrested him. When they got up in court and tried to explain what had happened, none of them could do it. I keep stories like this in my files.
  • Interviewer: Do you think of the artist at all as being a con man?
  • William S. Burroughs: In a sense. You see, a real con man is a creator. He creates a set. No, a con man is more a movie director than a writer. The Yellow Kid created a whole set, a whole cast of characters, a whole brokerage house, a whole bank. It was just like a movie studio.
  • Interviewer: What about addicts?
  • William S. Burroughs: Well, there will be a lot of morphine addiction. Remember that there were a great many addicts at that time. Jesse James was an addict. He started using morphine for a wound in his lung, and I don't know whether he was permanently addicted, but he tried to kill himself. He took sixteen grains of morphine and it didn't kill him, which indicates a terrific tolerance. So he must have been fairly heavily addicted. A dumb, brutal hick; that's what he was, like Dillinger. And there were so many genteel old ladies who didn't feel right unless they had their Dr. Jones mixture every day.
  • Interviewer: What other character types interest you?
  • William S. Burroughs: Not the people in advertising and television, nor the American postman or middle-class housewife; not the young man setting forth. The whole world of high finance interests me, the men such as Rockefeller who were specialized types of organisms that could exist in a certain environment. He was really a moneymaking machine, but I doubt that he could have made a dime today because he required the old laissez-faire capitalism. He was a specialized monopolistic organism. My uncle Ivy created images for him. I fail to understand why people like J. Paul Getty have to come on with such a stuffy, uninteresting image. He decides to write his life history. I've never read anything so dull, so absolutely devoid of any spark. Well, after all, he was quite a playboy in his youth. There must have been something going on. None of it's in the book. Here he is, the only man of enormous wealth who operates alone, but there's nobody to present the image. Well, yes, I wouldn't mind doing that sort of job myself. I'd like to take somebody like Getty and try to find an image for him that would be of some interest. If Getty wants to build an image, why doesn't he hire a first-class writer to write his story? For that matter, advertising has a long way to go. I'd like to see a story by Norman Mailer or John O'Hara which just makes some mention of a product, say, Southern Comfort. I can see the O'Hara story. It would be about someone who went into a bar and asked for Southern Comfort; they didn't have it, and he gets into a long, stupid argument with the bartender. It shouldn't be obtrusive; the story must be interesting in itself so that people read this just as they read any story in Playboy, and Southern Comfort would be guaranteed that people will look at that advertisement for a certain number of minutes. You see what I mean? They'll read the story. Now, there are many other ideas; you could have serialized comic strips, serial stories. Well, all we have to do is have James Bond smoking a certain brand of cigarettes.
  • Interviewer: In some respects, Nova Express seems to be a prescription for social ailments. Do you see the need, for instance, of biologic courts in the future?
  • William S. Burroughs: Certainly. Science eventually will be forced to establish courts of biologic mediation, because life-forms are going to become more incompatible with the conditions of existence as man penetrates further into space. Mankind will have to undergo biologic alterations ultimately, if we are to survive at all. This will require biologic law to decide what changes to make. We will simply have to use our intelligence to plan mutations, rather than letting them occur at random. Because many such mutations—look at the saber-toothed tiger—are bound to be very poor engineering designs. The future, decidedly, yes. I think there are innumerable possibilities, literally innumerable. The hope lies in the development of nonbody experience and eventually getting away from the body itself, away from three-dimensional coordinates and concomitant animal reactions of fear and flight, which lead inevitably to tribal feuds and dissension.
  • Interviewer: You see hope for the human race, but at the same time you are alarmed as the instruments of control become more sophisticated.
  • William S. Burroughs: Well, whereas they become more sophisticated they also become more vulnerable. Time, Life, Fortune applies a more complex, effective control system than the Mayan calendar, but it also is much more vulnerable because it is so vast and mechanized. Not even Henry Luce understands what's going on in the system now. Well, a machine can be redirected. One technical sergeant can fuck up the whole works. Nobody can control the whole operation. It's too complex. The captain comes in and says, “All right, boys, we're moving up.” Now, who knows what buttons to push? Who knows how to get the cases of Spam up to where they're going, and how to fill out the forms? The sergeant does. The captain doesn't know. As long as there're sergeants around, the machine can be dismantled, and we may get out of all this alive yet.
  • Interviewer: Sex seems equated with death frequently in your work.
  • William S. Burroughs: That is an extension of the idea of sex as a biologic weapon. I feel that sex, like practically every other human manifestation, has been degraded for control purposes, or really for antihuman purposes. This whole Puritanism. How are we ever going to find out anything about sex scientifically, when a priori the subject cannot even be investigated? It can't even be thought about or written about. That was one of the interesting things about Reich. He was one of the few people who ever tried to investigate sex—sexual phenomena, from a scientific point of view. There's this prurience and this fear of sex. We know nothing about sex. What is it? Why is it pleasurable? What is pleasure? Relief from tension? Well, possibly.
  • Interviewer: Mary McCarthy has characterized you as a soured utopian. Is that accurate?
  • William S. Burroughs: I do definitely mean what I say to be taken literally, yes, to make people aware of the true criminality of our times, to wise up the marks. All of my work is directed against those who are bent, through stupidity or design, on blowing up the planet or rendering it uninhabitable. Like the advertising people we talked about, I'm concerned with the precise manipulation of word and image to create an action, not to go out and buy a Coca-Cola, but to create an alteration in the reader's consciousness. You know, they ask me if I were on a desert island and knew nobody would ever see what I wrote, would I go on writing. My answer is most emphatically yes. I would go on writing for company. Because I'm creating an imaginary—it's always imaginary—world in which I would like to live.
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So, I felt like it would be a good time to open commissions back up again, since I’ve realized that I need to actually start saving up money again! Keep in mind, I do humans as well, along with other fantasy creatures. (Well, it depends really, you’d have to show me ;v;)

All I ask is that you give me as MUCH detail as possible, references are always best!! I also ask that you pay me before I show you the finished product, and you can wait as long as you’d like to pay so long as you do! I will send you a sketch (unless the commission IS a sketch) of the piece before completing it, to ensure that I have everything correct.

To order a commission or ask a question, just send me a message on my tumblr, or you may send me a note on my deviantART at Shrew-WiFi. <3 I’ll go into detail under the cut about each commission!

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