by the observer

OK BUT THE GREAT ATTRACTOR FREAKS ME OUT SO MUCH BECAUSE ALL THESE GALAXIES ARE HEADED TOWARDS IT BUT NO-ONE QUITE KNOWS WHAT’S THERE AND THERE’S JUST SO MUCH MASS??? WHAT IS IT??? I DON’T KNOW DOES ANYONE???

there’s something so amusing about characters in animated media drawing other things in the universe. like this is it. the style of this sketch determines the actual aesthetics of this universe. how these characters actually perceive their surroundings vs how these surroundings are presented in the animation. 

like, do anime characters actually see each other in an anime style?

Originally posted by grandbluedreaming

why do some see their surroundings in realism with complex shading but we see them with simple flat colors? what would even qualify as “realism” to an animated character?

Originally posted by sketchswitch

is this girl aware that “The Thinker” represents a vastly different aesthetic than anything that exists in her universe?

Originally posted by penny-awful

it’s an interesting thing for animators to consider. they’re presenting a story in a certain visual style, but does the art made by their characters, which reflects how those characters see their animated world, match the style we see?

Originally posted by furuba

i mean I’m definitely reading wayyy too far into this but there’s some implications here that keep me up at night. 

6

september / part1

School has been amazingly tiring and demanding but also amazingly fun and I feel so glad there. 
Anyway I don’t have time at all for myself so all I have to show are some sketches for this kind of ‘observation diary’ we have to hold everyday. 
xx

6

I cropped some of my TAZ fanart to fit into phone wallpaper sizes since I get a lot of messages of people trying to edit them to the proper resolution. Here are some Lup-centric ones (I plan on doing more but these are just the first). In case tumblr destroys the quality on these, here’s an imgur album with the proper 1080x1920 resolutions: http://imgur.com/a/nDYzj

You can edit these into your theme or icons, I don’t mind. This goes for playlist covers, album art, AMV usage as well. Just don’t remove credit and give me a shout out when you do so! I’d rather people not just completely reupload these to other sites though.

bodhirookisandorable  asked:

I'm hoping that it's Finn's hand reaching out (maybe to Rey, maybe to another person). I only watched it on my phone so I might of missed something that meant it was definitely KRs but I'm really hoping it's a big misdirect. It seems so much more in Finn's character to reach out for someone as well. It probably won't be bc they're ignoring Finn but you can hope right?

You know, I freaking can’t believe this just had me Google Kylo Ren in TLJ to have a closer look at his costume. I could think of few things I would want to do less today, but here we are.

Because you do make an interesting observation.



Here is the hand we see held out.

Black leather glove, black smooth sleeve and a non-patterned chest of the black shirt.

Okay, that would be Kylo right?

Or maybe not.

Here’s how Kylo looks just just before the cut to the outstretched hand.

And here is a larger view of his costume from EW

Please not that he has the same striped, layered sleeves as he had in TFA and his “overshirt” is a padded vest, the has vertical stitching across it.

So… even if he takes the vest off, unless he’s changed his clothes completely and now have a completely different shirt on, it can’t be him.


Finn on the other hand.

We unfortunately don’t see a lot of him, but here’s what we have


Now he doesn’t have a glove on his left hand, but while it is hard to tell with all the flash and light but he might have one on his right and we know that some First Order officers wears gloves. Funny how we apart from these very glaring shorts have nothing of Finn in FO uniform where we can see his hands. Even with the old promotional pic of him and Rose they are cut off at the chest.

Of course the code cylinders on Finn’s top vest aren’t in the picture with the hand, nor is the belt. But all Finn would have to do is take off the belt and vest - like maybe after a battle where it got torn and he don’t need it anymore anyway - and he would look exactly like the figure with the hand.


Considering all the falling, burning debris and everything, the shot with the hand and the shot with Kylo almost certainly comes from the same scene. But both of them also seems to belong in the “burning battle shots sequence” that we see Finn in. (That falling, burning debris again.)

So you know, I think you might be on to something. That the person with the hand could very well be Finn. 

Whoever it is, it sure as hell isn’t Kylo.

Eclipse 2017 From Space

On Aug. 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse passed over North America. People throughout the continent captured incredible images of this celestial phenomenon. We and our partner agencies had a unique vantage point on the eclipse from space. Here are a few highlights from our fleet of satellites that observe the Sun, the Moon and Earth.

Our Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which watches the Sun nearly 24/7 from its orbit 3,000 miles above Earth, saw a partial eclipse on Aug. 21.

SDO sees the Moon cross in front of the Sun several times a year. However, these lunar transits don’t usually correspond to an eclipse here on Earth, and an eclipse on the ground doesn’t guarantee that SDO will see anything out of the ordinary. In this case, on Aug. 21, SDO did see the Moon briefly pass in front of the Sun at the same time that the Moon’s shadow passed over the eastern United States. From its view in space, SDO only saw 14 percent of the Sun blocked by the Moon, while most U.S. residents saw 60 percent blockage or more.

Six people saw the eclipse from the International Space Station. Viewing the eclipse from orbit were NASA’s Randy Bresnik, Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson, the European Space Agency’s Paolo Nespoli, and Roscosmos’ Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy. The space station crossed the path of the eclipse three times as it orbited above the continental United States at an altitude of 250 miles.

From a million miles out in space, our Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera, or EPIC, instrument captured 12 natural color images of the Moon’s shadow crossing over North America. EPIC is aboard NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory, or DSCOVR, where it photographs the full sunlit side of Earth every day, giving it a unique view of the shadow from total solar eclipses. EPIC normally takes about 20 to 22 images of Earth per day, so this animation appears to speed up the progression of the eclipse.

A ground-based image of the total solar eclipse – which looks like a gray ring – is superimposed over a red-toned image of the Sun’s atmosphere, called the corona. This view of the corona was captured by the European Space Agency and our Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, or SOHO. At center is an orange-toned image of the Sun’s surface as seen by our Solar Dynamics Observatory in extreme ultraviolet wavelengths of light.

During a total solar eclipse, ground-based telescopes can observe the lowest part of the solar corona in a way that can’t be done at any other time, as the Sun’s dim corona is normally obscured by the Sun’s bright light. The structure in the ground-based corona image — defined by giant magnetic fields sweeping out from the Sun’s surface — can clearly be seen extending into the outer image from the space-based telescope. The more scientists understand about the lower corona, the more they can understand what causes the constant outward stream of material called the solar wind, as well as occasional giant eruptions called coronal mass ejections.

As millions of Americans watched the total solar eclipse that crossed the continental United States, the international Hinode solar observation satellite captured its own images of the awe-inspiring natural phenomenon. The images were taken with Hinode’s X-ray telescope, or XRT, as it flew above the Pacific Ocean, off the west coast of the United States, at an altitude of approximately 422 miles. Hinode is a joint endeavor by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, the European Space Agency, the United Kingdom Space Agency and NASA.

During the total solar eclipse our Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, in orbit around the Moon, turned one of its instruments towards Earth to capture an image of the Moon’s shadow over a large region of the United States.

As LRO crossed the lunar south pole heading north at 3,579 mph, the shadow of the Moon was racing across the United States at 1,500 mph. A few minutes later, LRO began a slow 180-degree turn to look back at Earth, capturing an image of the eclipse very near the location where totality lasted the longest. The spacecraft’s Narrow Angle Camera began scanning Earth at 2:25:30 p.m. EDT and completed the image 18 seconds later.

Sensors on the polar-orbiting Terra and Suomi NPP satellites gathered data and imagery in swaths thousands of miles wide. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS, sensor on Terra and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite, or VIIRS, on Suomi NPP captured the data used to make this animation that alternates between two mosaics. Each mosaic is made with data from different overpasses that was collected at different times.

This full-disk geocolor image from NOAA/NASA’s GOES-16 shows the shadow of the Moon covering a large portion of the northwestern U.S. during the eclipse.

Our Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, or IRIS, mission captured this view of the Moon passing in front of the Sun on Aug. 21.  

Check out nasa.gov/eclipse to learn more about the Aug. 21, 2017, eclipse along with future eclipses, and follow us on Twitter for more satellite images like these: @NASASun, @NASAMoon, and @NASAEarth.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com.

much like the stranger things fandom, the it fandom loves to ignore their characters of color. now, what the hell is up with that??

Chasing the Shadow of Neptune’s Moon Triton

Our Flying Observatory

Our flying observatory, called SOFIA, carries a 100-inch telescope inside a Boeing 747SP aircraft. Scientists onboard study the life cycle of stars, planets (including the atmosphere of Mars and Jupiter), nearby planetary systems, galaxies, black holes and complex molecules in space.

AND on Oct. 5, SOFIA is going on a special flight to chase the shadow of Neptune’s moon Triton as it crosses Earth’s surface!

In case you’re wondering, SOFIA stands for: Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy.

Triton

Triton is 1,680 miles (2,700 km) across, making it the largest of the 13 moons orbiting Neptune. Unlike most large moons in our solar system, Triton orbits in the opposite direction of Neptune, called a retrograde orbit. This backward orbit leads scientists to believe that Triton formed in an area past Neptune, called the Kuiper Belt, and was pulled into its orbit around Neptune by gravity. 

The Voyager 2 spacecraft flew past Neptune and Triton in 1989 and found that Triton’s atmosphere is made up of mostly nitrogen…but it has not been studied in nearly 16 years!

Occultations are Eclipse-Like Events

An occultation occurs when an object, like a planet or a moon, passes in front of a star and completely blocks the light from that star. As the object blocks the star’s light, it casts a faint shadow on Earth’s surface

But unlike an eclipse, these shadows are not usually visible to the naked eye because the star and object are much smaller and not nearly as bright as our sun. Telescopes with special instruments can actually see these shadows and study the star’s light as it passes near and around the object – if they can be in the right place on Earth to catch the shadow.

Chasing Shadows

Scientists have been making advanced observations of Triton and a background star. They’ve calculated exactly where Triton’s faint shadow will fall on Earth! Our SOFIA team has designed a flight path that will put SOFIA (the telescope and aircraft) exactly in the center of the shadow at the precise moment that Triton and the star will align. 

This is no easy feat because the shadow is moving at more than 53,000 mph while SOFIA flies at Mach 0.85 (652 mph), so we only have about two minutes to catch the shadow!! But our SOFIA team has previously harnessed the aircraft’s mobility to study Pluto from inside the center of its occultation shadow, and is ready to do it again to study Triton!

What We Learn From Inside the Shadow

From inside the shadow, our team on SOFIA will study the star’s light as it passes around and through Triton’s atmosphere. This allows us to learn more about Triton’s atmosphere, including its temperature, pressure, density and composition! 

Our team will use this information to examine if Triton’s atmosphere has changed since our Voyager 2 spacecraft flew past it in 1989. That’s a lot of information from a bit of light inside a shadow! Similar observations of Uranus in 1977, from our previous flying observatory, led to the discovery of rings around that planet!

International Ground-Based Support

Ground-based telescopes across the United States and Europe – from Scotland to the Canary Islands – will also be studying Triton’s occultation. Even though most of these telescopes will not be in the center of the shadow, the simultaneous observations, from different locations on Earth, will give us information about how Triton’s atmosphere varies across its latitudes. 

This data from across the Earth and from onboard SOFIA will help researchers understand how Triton’s atmosphere is distorted at different locations by its high winds and its strong tides!

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com.

playlist to fuck shit up to

Originally posted by primarity

  1. Aquarius Apocalyptic - Stop Light Observations
  2. Deadcrush - alt-J
  3. Bullet With Butterfly Wings - The Smashing Pumpkins
  4. You Probably Couldn’t See For the Lights But You Were Staring Straight At Me - Arctic Monkeys
  5. Uprising - Muse
  6. Toes - Glass Animals
  7. My Medicine - The Pretty Reckless
  8. Feel It Still - Portugal. The Man
  9. The Only Way To My Heart… - Foxy Shazam
  10. Ain’t No Rest For the Wicked - Cage the Elephant
  11. Feeling Good (Bassnectar Remix) - Nina Simone
  12. Loser - Beck