by me: lotr

It’s such a strange feeling when something comes into your life like a movie or an artist or a band that just feels like it’s made from the same stuff you are, it immediately becomes part of how you define yourself and it’s everything you see yourself as at that point in your life and everything that you aspire to be and it’s such a bizarre sensation when you discover something and you immediately feel it fill a hole inside you that you didn’t know was there

I realize this is not new information to anyone, but what struck me so hard this time I read the Lord of the Rings was the sense of melancholy.  Like it’s painfully obvious to the reader that this world is Not As It Once Was.  All of the characters we meet reference this feeling of loss in one way or another.  

The elves are the most obvious - with their fading light and their ships sailing away.  Treebeard talks about how the woods aren’t as they once were, about the ents who are falling asleep and withering to nothing.  The dwarves lust after the glory of their forefathers, be it in mountain fortresses or caverns of mithril - now empty and echoing.  Old Tom Bombadil remembers a race of great men and women, reduced simply to trinkets in cold tombs.

And even men, the race set to inherit this new age, even they are experiencing this sense of melancholy, of losing hold of something great.  We see their great cities reduced to rubble on riverbanks, or possessed by evil.  Aragorn longs to return to his throne to restore the glory of ages past, to somehow rejuvenate that which is dying in the race of men. 

And hobbits?  At first we see them as living in the present, with no great glory of the past to tie them down.  Yet when Frodo returns to the Shire, it is…Not As It Once Was.  And I think while the other hobbits are able to shake off this feeling and return to their love of life and the present, maybe Frodo’s true burden is to inherit this sense of loss from the rest of Middle Earth.  

It’s so weird to think that there are people who watch Lord of the Rings for the first time????? And don’t know what’s going to happen?????

They don’t know what the Shire is??? They don’t know the Fellowship will break???? They don’t know what Gondor or Rohan is???? They don’t know the basic geography of Middle Earth?? They don’t know who will die??? They don’t know Gandalf will come back???? Or that Frodo will go to the Undying Lands??? They’ve never heard the soundtrack??? They don’t have the dialogue memorized???? 

What on earth is that like??????? 

So I’ve been re-skimming some LotR in between looking for new books to read and Boromir mentions his brother like, three times in the Council of Elrond. And I realize it’s dramatic foreshadowing shit, but consider (modern au apparently) Boromir who just talks about his brother all the time and has so many pictures:

“Hobbits like poetry? My brother won a poetry contest in third grade!!! You know who’d love to hear more about Dwarves? My brother. Gosh, I can’t wait until we all get to Minas Tirith so I can show you all the best things about my city and you can meet my brother.”


“Yeah, I’ve seen Boromir, he’s a great dude,” says Eomer, “but I hear he talks about his brother a lot?”


“How do I know you’ve actually met my brother?” asks Faramir. “And how do you know who I am?”

“… I have seen probably a hundred pictures of you and heard the stories behind all of them,” says Frodo.

“Ah,” says Faramir, resigned. “Yeah, okay, you’ve met him.”

  • <p> <b>Tolkien:</b> By the end of the Third Age, Sauron's physical power is so diminished that his presence is confined to the tower of Barad-Dur. However, he is still immensely powerful in his ability to watch and predict the movements of his enemies, and his understanding extends so far that he could metaphorically be referred to as a Great Eye, constantly watching and planning his next move. And because his gaze is so piercing, it is sometimes likened to fire.<p/><b>Peter Jackson:</b> Okay but...hear me out...what if Sauron was literally....a Great Eye.<p/><b>Tolkien:</b> What.<p/><b>Peter Jackson:</b> What if he was literally a giant eyeball on the top of Barad-Dur.<p/><b>Tolkien:</b> That's not quite what I inten-<p/><b>Peter Jackson:</b> Made of FIRE. A LITERAL GIANT FIERY EYEBALL.<p/></p>

I know 22 September is Bilbo and Frodo Baggins’ birthday—but let us not forget that it is also the date in which Samwise Gamgee, last of the Ring-bearers, leaves Middle-earth for ever to reunite with Frodo.

Ok but Pippin was a child. 

 The book says that Pippin is the only one of the four hobbits who hasn’t “come of age.” He was a young and immature teenager-in-Hobbit-years who (in the beginning of the story) thought and acted like a young and immature teenager. 

They didn’t have time for this in the films, but book-Elrond initially refused to let Pippin join the Fellowship. He was like “these Hobbits are fine, but I draw the line at this one. He’s too young.” 

Why does he let him join? Because Elrond thought that if Pippin had understood his decision, he would have joined anyway. If Pippin were mature enough to know what he was doing, he would’ve made the same choice. But he wasn’t. 

So it kinda bothers me when other members of the fellowship mock Pippin for being a fool? (side eyes Gandalf). Of course he’s a fool– he wasn’t mature enough for this journey and you all knew it.

All the hobbits went through hell, but Pippin wasn’t even an adult when he was thrown into war and death and survivor’s guilt and blaming himself for Boromir’s death and all that other insane trauma….