by jessie

How to Use Description to Show Character Development

This is a follow-up to my post How to Make Your Descriptions Less Boring. In that post, I talked about the difference between static descriptions and dynamic descriptions and argued that as long as you’re using dynamic descriptions, readers will be much more engaged and you can throw out the old “don’t use description because it’s boring” advice.

To recap:

Static descriptions don’t move or get interacted with. They exist almost like a painted backdrop to a play or the background on an old cartoon.

Example: The grass was green.

Dynamic descriptions, on the other hand, take on the voice and perceptions of your point-of-view character, and are interactive. They combine description, action, perception, and character development.

Example: The grass outside the house was so green James couldn’t believe it – it almost looked fake. After looking around to make sure no one was watching, he squatted down and ran his hands through it.

If you’re new to description, trying to use more dynamic description is a great starting point…

…but there’s so much more you can do with description once you understand how to work with it!

Keep reading

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Musashi, what???

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