by hayashi

6

“I finally found someone that I like. Wearing the same uniform and the same shoes. Sitting in the same class, born in the same year.”

Doukyuusei (同級生) directed by Shouko Nakamura 

「I feel numb in this kingdom」 🚬🎶



Tribute to the new Life Is Strange: Before The Storm. I’m just so excited about it I can’t wait! I’ve been listening to Numbers, the song of Daughter that appears in the trailer, and I feel so damn related it’s even difficult not to weep when I listen to it. With this piece I wanted yo reflect Chloe’s loneliness. She’s always high trying to escape from the real world, but it doesn’t stop her pain anyways. I think I’m gonna love playing as her. Wait for more LiS drawings! 🦋

2

a magical girl i designed for @cottontaildwarf !!

Yuri on Ice interview translation - Animage 2017/01 (p20-23)

I was going to post this last week but gave priority to the BD stuff. This will be the final interview from the booklet that came with January Animage! There’s still an interview with Kenji Miyamoto left untranslated, but it will be taken care of by @whiteboxgems​ whenever she has time! I’ll reblog it when it’s around.

This is actually 2 interviews, I’m posting them together because they were one after the other and (main reason) because the second one is very short.
A few notes below to better understand the interviews.

The first one is with Yuuichirou Hayashi, the one who created the ending (ED = ending by the way) footage. I have the feeling someone previously posted translations of the captions under the ED screenshots, but I don’t remember where and I’m pretty sure it was just the captions and not the interview parts, so here you have it complete. This one is pretty interesting because he explains in detail how they created the ED, and has some extra information on cut scenes etc. Definitely a must read in my opinion!

The second one is a short interview with Kayoko Ishikawa, the one who did the costume designs. Here you might think: didn’t Chacott design the costumes? I’ll explain. It’s more or less like with Mitsurou Kubo and Tadashi Hiramatsu: Kubo created the original designs for the characters, from scratch, and Hiramatsu transformed them into designs specifically created for animation, therefore with simpler lines, detailed expression sheets and so on. Likewise, Chacott did the original designs for the costumes, from scratch, based on the indications by Yamamoto and Kubo, and then the anime’s costume designer simplified and modified them so that they would be suitable to be animated. (Before actually animating them there’s a further step: the anime’s color designer is going to decide the exact colors, shadows and highlights included, that will be used inside the anime. I translated an interview with the color designer Izumi Hirose some time ago)

I usually don’t add pictures but this time I felt that it would be better to add them as an immediate reference. However, they are just for reference and are not meant to be visually stunning, so please bear with the quality because I just took photos of the magazine with my phone and quickly edited them.

Translation under the cut! (kind of image-heavy)

***If you wish to share this translation please do it by reblogging or posting a link to it***

***Re-translating into other languages is ok but please mention that this post is the source***

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sharpington  asked:

when you reblogged that face tutorial you mentioned you rarely see your hairline depicted in art--which hairline is that? I've never thought to pay attention to them before

Hey hey!! I’m so glad you posed this question!!

Hairlines aren’t really extensively talked about in terms of design, and I find that people just tend to use the same old ‘rounded’ or ‘squared-off’ hairlines when designing characters, ignoring the fact that natural hairlines are just as diverse as our other facial features. We lack proper language to describe them, and outside of the black natural hair community, people often don’t give hairlines a thought until they start to go bald. This problem with lack of terminology actually made it hard for me to find good reference for you!!

My hairline actually isn’t that rare in East Asian ethnicities, yet because it’s undesirable and doesn’t conform to beauty standards, no one ever depicts it in art save for a very select few that make it a part of their distinct style. The two artists that immediately come to my mind are illustrators Hayashi Seiichi and He Jiaying. Here is an excerpt from a Hayashi illustration:

And one from He Jiaying:

(He’s illustrations actually helped me come to love my hairline, after years of hiding it and being ashamed of it. Nowdays I don’t stare at my hairline in the mirror, feeling insecure and self-conscious, fervently wishing I could make my baby hairs grow thicker. I now rock a bun nearly daily. Representation matters!!)

My hairline was once described to me as ‘a variation of the classic straight’- though it looks normal when my hair is down, when it’s pulled up, two sharp triangles of baby hair immediately make themselves distinctly visible, too short to get pulled back along with the rest. These two patches right above the temples are thin and fluffy, different in texture to the rest of the scalp.

Here are some examples I yanked from the internet. Pay attention to how the patches of baby hair are visible only when the hair is pulled back:

You can even see it in some of the selfies I’ve posted onto tumblr, lmao!! (#truffs face) My mother, grandmother and both blood related aunts (all entirely Korean) share this hairline with me. It’s entirely genetic, very common and nothing we should be ashamed of.

Now that I’ve embraced my hairline, whenever I draw myself or my characters who share this trait, I tend to deliberately draw in these patches of thinner hair, making sure to pay attention to the directional pull of the strands and visually communicate that it’s less full in these areas. I know my own insecurity made me hyper-aware of hairlines since youth, and normally people don’t pay attention to them at all. But I still objectively feel that they are an important feature of how a head is designed overall, and mine is a distinct physical aspect of myself, and I want people to know that I LOVE my hairline and I know that it’s worth being represented!!