by emy

Despite all the incredible previews, I’ll admit I was a little wary going into Moo Moo, only because racial profiling is a really heavy topic to cover in ~22 minutes, especially in a comedy. I spent a lot of time thinking about how the conflict between Terry and Holt might play out. My fear was either the episode would slip into “after school special” territory and ultimately present a superficial, overly simplistic depiction of the issue, or veer all the off to the other end and give us a dark, bleak ending devoid of that hope and optimism that makes B99 so special. Nothing against B99 – I’ve just been burned by many a show before, and this is a topic that could be an absolute disaster in the wrong hands. 

But then there’s this? A show that is thoughtful and nuanced while showing us the horrors of racial profiling and the complexities of reporting it, that doesn’t shy away from the fact that we still have a lot of work to do but also allows Terry and Holt to have their own personal victory? That covered a super serious subject, including a conversation where two beautiful young black girls asked questions they should never have to ask, but still allowed for moments of joy and laughter that felt genuine? And that did it all in about twenty minutes, wrapping up on a beautifully bittersweet note that was just the right tone for an episode of this level of importance?

I’m just in awe. And I feel really, really lucky that we have so many incredible people involved with this show who share it with us. 

The Devil’s in the Details

I’ve been watching so much Ladybug that Netflix decided to give us a recommendation.  One of those “this has a 5% chance of being like the show you were watching” deals.  I don’t really watch anime, but Dave keeps trying to get me into it.

It’s called Hataraku Maō-sama! (The Devil Is a Part-Timer!) and is exactly as it sounds.  The leader of the demons gets turned into a teenager and works at a rip-off of McDonald’s.  There was a manga series in 2011 and it was made into a 13-episode anime series in 2013.

Not only is it funny as crap, I think Netflix is onto something with that Ladybug reference.

Adrien, you ridiculous dork.  Stop getting your social cues from anime.


Bonus:


Edit:  

Two normal teenagers who use their time-sensitive powers to fight evil together, all the while snarking at the other person…and the girl keeps denying feelings she has towards him.  Yeah.  I see Netflix’s point.