by carlow

I think one of the most bizarre things to ever happen to me in 2016 is walking through Carlow and seeing a boy racer car tear past blaring Rose of Mooncoin

Pittsburgh Gothic
  • You’re waiting for the 61D. A 61A goes past. A 61A goes past. A 61A goes past. A 61A goes past. 
  • The closer you get to the Squirrel Hill tunnel, the slower everything moves. Cars. People. Particles. It’s cold. Oh god, you’re so cold. 
  • It was raining this morning, now it’s sunny outside. You check the thermometer, and it reads sixty. Better salt your sidewalk, gonna snow tonight.
  • You dropped a rock in that pothole on Brookline, and waited to hear it hit the bottom. You’re still waiting.
  • The sidewalk is getting steeper and steeper. Now there’s stairs. You climb and climb and climb. Look, a mountain goat. 
  • Your GPS tells you to take a sharp right to stay on Forbes. Your GPS tells you to take a slight left to stay on Forbes. Your GPS tells you to hit the man in the suit to stay on Forbes. Hit the man. Hit him. 
  • No one goes to Carlow University.
  • Bleeding? Buildings don’t bleed, don’t be silly. That’s just the steel rusting.
  • An orange sign just ahead of you reads “End Road Work.” You laugh, and see another sign. “Please. Please, I have children. End it.”
  • They built a bridge under the bridge to keep the bridge from falling on the other bridge under that bridge. The trolls are confused. Where can they live?
  • Someone said that if you fall in the Mon, when you climb out, your skin will peel off. Ridiculous. No one escapes the Mon. 
  • You’re trying to get home, but every single street is a one way that takes your further and further away. Where is home? What is home? 
  • They say the steel mills poisoned the air and killed the sky. Is that why it weeps? Whenever thunder roars, you swear you can hear a sob. 
  • A man is stabbed with a bottle outside the bar, and ichor the color of tar drips from between his fingers, flecked with gleaming yellow. He bleeds black and gold. The gutters overflow with black and gold. Steelers going to the superbowl.
  • You woke up and found U P M C etched into your wrist. You went to UPMC physician, and he sent you to UPMC Shadyside. They checked you out and said it’s nothing serious. Good thing you have UPMC healthcare, could have been pricey otherwise. 
  • The guy at Phipps laughs when you ask him what they use for fertilizer and shows you big bins of mulch in the back. Pitt students keep disappearing. The bins are never empty for long. 
  • The treasure map reads “Turn left at the big church, then go straight till you see a PNC.” Thirty souls set out to find it, each took a different path. None returned. 
E-Books & Apps for Gaelic Polytheists {Google Play Edition}

This past holiday season I moved into the 21st century by being gifted a tablet. Since getting it I have uploaded several apps and e-books that might be of interest to other Gaelic Polytheists {and perhaps some for other types of Celtic Polytheists}.

For this particular list will feature apps and e-books that I found on Google Play, and will hopefully at some point expand the list for resources from other places. list is what I current have on my tablet or on my wishlist. This is by no means all that is available, so I encourage folks to go on a wee treasure hunt to see what they can find. However, be forewarned that there is garbage available as well {i.e. “Celtic chakras” and related new age poop}.

Applications

E-Books

If you know of any other apps, e-books or even movies and music that should be on this list, please feel free to share!

Sláinte!

Laurel

4

Ballyloughan Castle, County Carlow, Ireland

Ballyloughan Castle was probably built in the 13th century and consisted of a large open courtyard with a curtain wall and a moat outside. Only a small square tower remains, as well as the entrance gate which is flanked by two large rounded towers.

The castle originally belonged to the Kavanaghs before passing into the hands of the Bagenal family of nearby Bagenalstown and following this the Bruen family in the early 19th century.

3

Brownshill Dolmen, County Carlow, Ireland

Officially known as the Kernanstown Cromlech, the dolmen is on a hill near the former grand estate house of Ducketts Grove, now in ruins. It was built between 4000 and 3000 BC by some of the earliest farmers to inhabit the island. It is also known as Brownshill Portal Tomb, so-called because the entrance to the burial chamber was flanked by two large upright stones (orthostats) supporting the granite capstone, or roof, of the chamber. The capstone weighs approx 150 tons and is believed to be the heaviest in all of Europe.

The capstone is thought to have been covered by an earthen mound and a gate stone blocked the entrance. At Brownshill both portal stones and the gate-stone are still in situ; the capstone lies on top of the portals and gate-stone and slopes to the ground away from the entrance. Not much additional information is available on Brownshill because it has never been excavated. A fourth upright stands close by and could be the remains of a forecourt. The extent of the chamber cannot be determined.

5

‘Appy St. Patrick’s Day ye scurvy dogs! Let’s celebrate with some famous Irish pirates eh!?

1) Anne Bonny (c. 1700 - c. 1782)[1] was an Irish woman who became a famous pirate, operating in the Caribbean.[2] What little is known of her life comes largely from Charles Johnson’s A General History of the Pyrates.


2) Edward England, born Edward Seegar (c.1685–1721)[3][4] was a famous African coast and Indian Ocean pirate captain from 1717 to 1720. The ships he sailed on included the Pearl (which he renamed The Royal James) and later the Fancy, for which England exchanged the Pearl in 1720. His flag was the classic Jolly Roger with a skull above two crossed Humerus bones on a black background.

3) Edward Jordan {no picutre} (1771–1809) was an Irish rebel, fisherman and pirate in Nova Scotia. He was typical of the violent but short-lived pirates in the 19th century following the end of “Golden Age of Piracy” in the 18th century. Born in County Carlow, Ireland, he took part in the Irish rebellions of 1797-98 but was pardoned and attempted to start a new life as a fisherman in Nova Scotia. On 13 September 1809, desperate to avoid debts, he slaughtered the crew of a merchant who came to seize the schooner he owned named Three Sisters.

4) Walter Kennedy (ca. 1695 - July 21, 1721) was an English pirate who served as a crew member under Howell Davis and Bartholomew Roberts. Walter Kennedy was born in 1695 at a place called Pelican Stairs in Wapping, London.[1] Possibly one or both of his parents were of Irish descent due to the fact that Bartholomew Roberts considered him to be Irish.

5) Grace O'Malley (c. 1530 – c. 1603; also Gráinne O'Malley,[1]Irish: Gráinne Ní Mháille) was Queen of Umaill, chieftain of the Ó Máille clan following in the footsteps of her father Eoghan Dubhdara Ó Máille. Upon his death, she inherited his large shipping and trading business (sometimes accused of being a piracy trade) Commonly known by her nickname Granuaile in Irish folklore, she is a well-known historical figure in 16th-century Irish history, and is sometimes known as “The Sea Queen of Connacht”.

8tracks.com
celtic all year 'round
St. Patrick's Day is over, but that doesn't mean the Celtic music has to leave with it. A mix of a few of my favorite Irish/Celtic(ish) songs, both traditional and rock/punk.

Immigrant Stomp - Scythian // Johnny Tarr - Gaelic Storm // Donal Agus Morag/The New-Rigged Ship - Altan // Hal-An-Tow - Tempest // Follow Me Up to Carlow - Young Dubliners // What’s Left of the Flag - Flogging Molly // Jungle of the Midwest Sea - Flatfoot 56 // The Donnybrook Affair - Carbon Leaf // A Pair of Brown Eyes - The Pogues // Dick Darby - The Fuchsia Band // The Rocky Reels - Deanta // Mull of Kintyre - Ashley MacIsaac (ft. Dallas Smith) // The Road to Santiago - Oysterband // Fortune - Great Big Sea