but-whatever-true-and-real-is-on-the-way

10

The story of Skye’s birth, as told by her parents

I think as Ray becomes more part of Team Arrow, he is able to see Felicity and Oliver interact and that can be painful, but at the same time enlightening about the true nature of their relationship,” he explains. “As hurt he may have been that she did not tell him about the relationship, he’s not one to hold a grudge and he’s a big enough boy to let go of that and just see that they have this real relationship or friendship now or whatever it is. How true her feelings really are in this moment have yet to be seen, but I think it allows him to understand and process all this new information in a more mature way as they proceed. He can put that aside basically as they are saving the city.
— 

Brandon Routh

I think i might feel bad for ray when he sees this. 

Who are the REAL victims, eh?

NIGHT FOUR: “GOD, WOMEN!”

And just like that, it’s Night Four of the Pointless Letters special event! All week we have been looking at the Daily Mail’s serialisation of “bloke bible” / “blistering polemic” / “deliciously provocative book” (or “hateful onanists manifesto”, whatever works for you), Stand By Your Manhood, detailing the way that men are marginalised, victimised, stamped on, belittled and otherwise oppressed in this cruel, cruel world. 

As with other nights, please have your fedoras and neckbeards set to starting positions. A red light will go on at any point you have to angrily shout “MISANDRY!”. 

So tonight, we’re looking at how victimised men are in matters of law and order - specifically, rape cases. Because, as Stand By Your Manhood argues, who are the real victims here, really? Whose lives are being ruined?

Now you might say “But you actually are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law”, and yes, you’d be right to say so, but stick with this. He’s going somewhere.

By the way, if you’re wondering at any point will there be any consideration given to the actual people who have been raped then the answer is no. Just so we’re clear.

Hrrrrrmmmmmm.

In 2013, the CPS did a study over a 17 month period, to see how many rape allegations turned out to be false. Here’s a quote from the Guardian story about the study:

“The study released on Wednesday by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) reveals that during the 17-month test period – when all false allegation cases were referred to the DPP – there were 5,651 prosecutions for rape and 111,891 for domestic violence in England and Wales.

By comparison, over the same timespan, there were only 35 prosecutions for making false allegations of rape, six for false allegations of domestic violence and three that involved false allegations of both rape and domestic violence.”

So to run the numbers for rape alone, that’s 5,651 prosecutions in the test period, with 38 false allegations in total that involved rape. So that’s 0.67%. 

As in, in less than 1% of cases were allegations found to be false. 

But ok, moving on…

So, I imagine, do the many thousands upon thousands of stories of women and men who have ACTUALLY BEEN RAPED.

But like I said above, let’s keep the focus on the real victims in this whole situation, shall we?

Filed under “L” for “Literally never been said by anyone, ever, ever ever ever.”

LOOK WE EVEN PUT IT IN A BIGGER FONT SO IT MUST BE TRUE

I know! Who do these rape charities think they are, eh? Not one has come forward! Not one! What are they doing with their time, eh?

What do you mean, “Providing support to people who have been raped?”

Oooookay……

Right, hang on…according to two breakdowns of the figures (here and here), the numbers run roughly like this: roughly 78,000 cases of rape every year (that’s an estimate, but enough to get us started). Of those, roughly 20% actually get reported to the police. Of those, about 18% go on to be prosecuted…

…and of those, about 38% go from “prosecution” to “actual conviction”. Which isn’t anywhere near “two out of three”. But, when you take the total amount of convictions against reported cases, not prosecuted, the figure drops to 7.01%.

Now bear in mind this is just a quick bit of maths using two sets of figures and a bit of averaging between the two (and also keeping in mind the usual caution about averages - if you stuck your head in a freezer and your feet in a roaring fire, on average you should be perfectly comfortable), but it’s not a million miles out from Harman’s “misleading” statistics.

They probably don’t even give the men a single fucking THOUGHT. That’s radical Marxists for you, though. Barbarians. 

Riiiiiiiight. Except that the police say that anonymity hurts investigations and that naming a suspect can encourage other victims to come forward, but OK. You’re the expert.

AND!

As if this wasn’t enough of a slap in the face to ALL MEN EVERYWHERE, there’s something else!

WHAT FRESH HELL IS THIIIIIIIS?

Have “long been considered” so I don’t need to identify who.

I hope you’re all taking notes, here. No magic.

Again, has anyone ever actually said this? Like, ever?

Riiiiiiiight…….

The HIGHEST GROSSING BOX OFFICE HIT of NINETEEN EIGHTY-SEVEN.

So remember, folks, as we head into our final night of this special event, now and forevermore Tom Selleck, Steve Guttenberg and Ted Danson are TRAITORS TO MEN for their VILE MISANDRIC PROPAGANDA

TOMORROW: The event concludes with, “The Way Forward”

anonymous asked:

Do you sometimes get the feeling that your body is being fetishized rather than just appreciated? Because I'm a fat girl and I get the impression from a lot of guys that my fat is like a turn on for them and sometimes I feel I should just get over it because it's supposed to be nice to be wanted or whatever but it's just really icky the vibes I get off of some guys when they tell me that they like my body.

I’ve only felt that way when interacting with people online. I very rarely get that type of attention in real life. I think the saying “if you’re not thin and white, you’re treated as a fetish” is pretty true though.

I get sad when I see posts about men calling girls fake gamer girls and include the Sims series in their “burns” to ridicule these girls, like, “just go back to playing your Sims family”…

These posts often try to prove the opposite, i.e. girls love “true” games like COD and GTA and TES too (or whatever). And in fact, this is really the problem.

They never back up the Sims series as a valid, real game. While I love playing GTA V and Skyrim as much as the next person, all the games I play are just as valid. The creations and devotion of this community are incredible and in that way they are truer gamers than the ones that sit back and shoot each other for an hour a day. How in the world do these people think they have the right to define what true gamers are? How is it ridiculous for a gamer to associate themselves with the Sims?

Saying someone plays the Sims shouldn’t be seen as humiliating.

anonymous asked:

why do people have to be rude and call fans delusional? we're not hurting anyone by enjoying our ship. i mean, isn't it part of the fun to take little moments and imagine it to be something more? maybe the ship ISN'T true but we still have the right to be hopeless romantics. and okay, you can say kaisoo isn't real or whatever you want, you have that right too. but to call others delusional is plain rude; many of us are not going around saying anti-kaisoo fans are delusional!

exactly like yeah sometimes i’m like OMG THE WAY HE LOOKS AT HIM HE WANTS TO FUCK HIS ASS ON STAGE!!!!!!!!! but i mean i’m not serious every damn time, i’m not gonna tone it down if people don’t like it just block me like i care

I am confused. You make me feel too much. I know we shouldnt and we can’t too much as happened but I love you and I always will. I think that much is setting in. I can get mad and cuss you and say everything under sun, that you werent shit and that you didnt treat me the way I deserved. That we just hurt each other because we were so scared of how pure and true whatever we had was so real. I hurt you just as much you hurt me and I think everyone forgets that. Your friends warned you with the same intensity as mine did about you.  I do know if I can love like that ever again. I don’t know if I can ever make love like that again. When we went to coffee I kept trying to get closure to end it. To finally close the chapter of us on a good note, a friendly note. But you wouldn’t let me. We just talked about your future after graduation. I dont know why or when it turned into a lecture about how you feel I am not living my life the way I want. You think I don’t want to do med school that I am not living my life because Im under my parents thumb. I dont know if you actually meant that. Shit I Know you didnt. You wouldn’t open  the convo with me coming to see you in Nigeria and how I would fit in and how your fam would show me a good time. It got so awks cause you knew you were getting heated and you backed down and asked me why I was getting so defensive because we talked about this before. But before was in the context of our relationship. I think you finally realized this is it for us and how you fucked up the last few months we have together forever. Too much has happened. Sometimes I want to call and cry and tell you everything I type on here if you havent read it already. I want you to hold me in your arms and make love to me for the last time. But I cant. My ego wont let me. I won’t even answer your messages properly. You’re still in my phone as “dont answer.” This is not to say I am not having fun with the other guy. He makes me smile. He makes time, hes sweet. But when we are intimate I can’t help but think of you. We never had to talk you just knew what I needed and how I needed it. In his defense we only a month in  where as you had year to learn the ins and out of me body and mind. I couldn’t even bring myself to tell you about him. You said I should get one so we could focus on our friendship but we both knew you didn’t mean it. He knows all about you. He thinks I need closure. God why do I get myself into this sticky situations. 

Links & Quotes

Bios has, to be sure, a certain shadowy or symbolic resemblance to Zoe: but only the sort of resemblance there is between a photo and a place, or a statue and a man. A man who changed from having Bios to having Zoe would have gone through as big a change as a statue which changed from being a carved stone to being a real man.” ―C.S. Lewis

“True faith embraces Christ in whatever ways the…

View On WordPress

anonymous asked:

Transphobic this, homophobic that, racist this, misogynist that... my GOD are you always this uptight about every single thing in real life too? Tumblr justice warriors have to be most annoying people ever making everything way deeper than it actually is.

I never call people out for being any of those things without a legitimate reason so it sounds like you’re someone who got too comfortable and is upset over being called out for being racist/homophobic/whatever because you know it’s true and you’re mad that society doesn’t let you get away with it anymore 💅🏾

I think we just ended something really great for about the dumbest reasons I’ve ever heard, but if all it takes is time and whatever to reach a true understanding and some self improvement, then I’m down. I think I maybe have in the past had one real red flag, and it had to do with going out. The others were just phases that I had to go through, and anxiety/OCD issues to deal with. That’s not a red flag if you know I am working on it. You seem to have more red flags than I do at times, and they always show up in the exact same ways… that’s why all our arguments seem so circular. Because I am always making the same points. At some point one of us has to realize that we are wrong and change for the better, because it can’t always be me just deciding to blame it on my anxiety and say “Oh no, he’s right, I shouldn’t feel that way or want that because its not real”

tessacostello asked:

R.I.P. to the girl you used to see. Her days are over, baby she's over.

“I didn’t want to come here today. That sounds worse out loud. I didn’t mean it like that. You know, how you all think I mean it because I don’t have a heart or whatever. Tessa wouldn’t jump that gun. She saw the best in everyone. In all of us. Almost like she was trying to make the world better one silver lining at a time. You can sit there and fight me on that but you know it’s true. She was hope. This bounding energy of something brighter than what the world had to offer and it swallowed her up. I miss her all the time, in stupid ways, like I’m watching Harry Potter and Snape is being a real dick to Harry and it’s only because he cares – you know, in that weird I wanted to fuck your dead mom kind of way. You’re our Harry and you died in the great war. It’s shit.”

Nearing the end

Sitting on the floor of the zillionth budget airport because thats how they can get away with charging 20 euros for a plane ticket.
I bought a plane ticket home a couple days ago. Two more budget planes, and ten more days of backpacking before i sit in an international airport with seats and wait for my flight back to canada.
Im excited.. Sort of.
I convinced myself on a train ride from budapest to berlin that i was doing this for the right reasons, but im not sure that is actually true.
Whatever the reasoning, in two weeks i wont be a backpacker anymore. Ill be a homeless, unemployed twenty something. I wont be stressed about finding my way from train stations to hostels, or overcoming language barriers. I’ll be stressed about finding a 9-5 and a boy.
So,
Welcome to the real world!

Stop minimizing and discounting your feelings. You have every right to feel the way you do. Your feelings may not always be logical, but they are always valid. Because if you feel something, then you feel it and it’s real to you. It’s not something you can ignore or wish away. It’s there, gnawing at you, tugging at your core, and in order to find peace, you have to give yourself permission to feel whatever it is you feel. You have to let go of what you’ve been told you “should” or “shouldn’t” feel. You have to drown out the voices of people who try to shame you into silence. You have to listen to the sound of your own breathing and honor the truth inside you. Because despite what you may believe, you don’t need anyone’s validation or approval to feel what you feel. Your feelings are inherently right and true. They’re important and they matter — you matter — and it is more than okay to feel what you feel. Don’t let anyone, including yourself, convince you otherwise.
—  Daniell Koepke // posted on Berlin-artparasites facebook page //
And So the Journey Begins...

Even though I’ve been preparing for this opportunity for close to three months, I feel like nothing has hit me till the past month. All the speeches, mail lettering, money calculations, and questions have helped me see how real this is. Despite not heading to the airport for a flight to Europe, I feel like my journey has already begun. A journey of hope, faith, trust, and all things unknown - just like any adventure. Each adventure holds an unpredictable ending, but results in lessons learned, a stronger self, and a sense of accomplishment. As I figure out this thing labeled “being a missionary”, I hope and pray I will hold true to these beliefs and take on whatever comes my way. Whatever this road leads to, I’m sure it’ll be a journey well taken.

Ladies, let's remember to not be twats to male allies. Love them!!

“No uterus, no opinion” totally holds true when a guy is calling YOU sexist for being intimidated, fed up, whatever, with men that sexually harass you on the street, or when a man tells you what birth control SHOULD cost or that your boyfriend has no moral obligation to pay half, or literally anything they’ve never been objected to,

But when a classy gentleman like a lot of my dearest real-life and tumbler friends wants to share a post or publicly make a statement that you’re agreed with, that a man sees things exactly the way you want him to see them, when they try to stand up for YOUR rights just for the sake of being a decent human, THE WAY YOU WANT EVERYONE TO BE,


TAKE A SECOND TO APPRECIATE THEM!!!!!
Don’t shoo off what they have to say, but definitely take a second to really let them know that their splendid efforts aren’t going unnoticed. I’ve seen ots of unsolicited hate from my fellow feminist ladies lately and that’s not cool! Neither is unsolicited sexual harassment and when a guy wants to openly admit that, let’s give him a high five instead of shunning him for trying to have an opinion on the cause.

Random thoughts I have when people are mean and my guy friends are awesome.

anonymous asked:

You know I think it's totally fine for Ney to find a girl attractive and ask for her number through ig it's what a normal guy his age would do lol but what I don't get is if that girl actually screen shotted the convo and put him on blast or if it was just a person who follows her on ig? Either way it's a real shit thing to do. Especially if it's the girl who did it for attention or money or whatever! That's really low of her, yes he's famous but you shouldn't exploit him like this smh

A normal guy his age… Yes. I agree, but Neymar is not normal. He’s famous and he has to be careful of the things he does because they can become misconstrued, just like this… (If it were true)… I think he’s smarter than this though… He would be setting himself up to be exploited if he actually did this.

No one can screen shot her DM’s but her. It’s a private message on Instagram. So unless she sent it to someone and someone else posted it. Shame on them because that is messed up putting him out there like that 😳😳

You Should Switch From Annual Surveys To Weekly Pulse Surveys

One thing I’ve never fully understood is why companies are so obsessed with annual surveys.

Annual employee engagement surveys are at the core of every HR department, but this needs to change. Doing a survey once a year is way too long of a timeframe to get any really accurate data.

As leaders, we need to be collecting feedback from our employees way more often. There’s no more waiting in life anymore. In the last few years, we’ve seen a huge shift in the world, everything is happening in real time. I get my news from social media, I can watch whatever I want online, I can find the answer to any question through Google, there’s no more waiting in life anymore, and the same should be true for employee engagement.

Companies have good intentions. The thinking is that by measuring engagement through employee surveys senior management can get insight into what their employees think and what needs to be improved.

While their intentions are good, I think companies are going about it the wrong way. Don’t get me wrong, engaged employees matter, but annual surveys don’t do anything to fix issues when they come up originally.

You want your employees to be engaged, so why not measure and improve engagement on an ongoing basis? Shorter employee pulse surveys are what you should be using instead.

Engaged employees will make your company more money, that’s been proven many times. Here are a few stats that will help prove this point:

  • Fifty-three percent of more than 2,000 U.S. adults surveyed reported that they would remain with their current employers for longer periods of time if they felt like they were more appreciated by their bosses.
  • JDA, a professional services firm, calculated the costs of replacing an employee, and they estimate that it costs up to $150,000 to replace a good employee. While the numbers change depending on the type of job, this is still a good example.
  • A 2009 study by Watson Wyatt showed that highly engaged workers are twice as likely to be top performers, and that three quarters of them exceed or far exceed expectations for performance.
  • A five percent increase in total employee engagement correlates to a .7 percent increase in operating margin.
  • Sears measured that a five point improvement in employee attitudes drove a 1.3 point improvement in customer satisfaction, which in turn drove a 0.5 percent improvement in revenue.
  • Standard Chartered Bank found that branches with a statistically significant increase in levels of employee engagement (0.2 or more on a scale of five) had a 16 percent higher profit margin growth than branches with decreased levels of employee engagement.
  • A study of 64 organizations revealed that organizations with highly engaged employees achieve twice the annual net income of organizations whose employees lag behind on engagement.
  • Fabick CAT, a company that sells, rents, and repairs Caterpillar construction equipment improved “percent of industry net sales” by 300 percent by focusing on employee happiness.
  • Employees with lower engagement are four times more likely to leave their jobs than those who are highly engaged.
  • Highly engaged employees were 87 percent less likely to leave their companies than their disengaged counterparts.

Annual employee surveys are notorious for having incredibly low response rates, averaging around 30 percent based on research I’ve seen. This doesn’t surprise me, since most annual surveys contain up to 100 bland, boring questions.

Plus, with the way most companies operate, they take months simply to generate the reports and analyze the data. Then in classic big company fashion, establish a “committee” to implement changes, which takes another few months. By the time this is all said and done, it’s time to start planning for next year’s survey.

When we were building Officevibe, one of the biggest things we took into consideration was how simply can we display the data for managers, and how fast. The data updates in real time, and we’ve done our best to make it as easy to understand as possible. No confusing buzzwords, just simple, straightforward data that updates as employees answer their questions.

Problems With Annual Surveys

There are so many problems with annual surveys, but here are a few that I can think of off the top of my head.

1. They’re Too Long

Survey fatigue is something that you really need to take into account if you’re creating a survey for your employees. A good question to ask yourself is, would you complete this survey?

According to research I’ve seen, there is a 20 percent abandon rate for surveys that take more than seven to eight minutes to complete. I personally think even that is too long, I would aim for five minutes.

2. They’re Too Infrequent

The problem with doing surveys annually is that you’re not addressing issues as they come up. This is probably the most counter-intuitive thing you can do if you’re trying to improve employee happiness.

If you want to make your employees feel happy, then listen to their feedback in real time (or as close to real time as possible).

3. Too Much Time Passes Before Results Are Shared

Here’s a typical schedule for an annual survey in a typical company:

January: Survey Is Launched
February: Survey Is Due
May: Results Come Out
June: Managers Start Following Up

Again, everything should be done and shared in near real time. By June, that survey you had me do in January is long forgotten about.

4. Employees Perceive No Value

The key word here is perceive (more on this later), but you need to be answering the question of “what’s in it for me”. Why should an employee take time out of their busy day to answer your survey? To win the new iPad? Because you told them so? Think about that answer.

5. Employees Don’t Believe It’s Anonymous

Employees (especially younger ones) are skeptical about survey anonymity because of how knowledgeable they are about the way computers and technology works. With things like NSA spying, Samsung smart TV’s listening to your conversations, and other examples of invasion of privacy, I think they have every right to be skeptical.

That’s why it makes sense to use a third-party, like Officevibe. I can’t stress enough how in Officevibe it truly is an anonymous employee survey. None of the managers that use Officevibe can see any of the individual answers, everything is aggregated anonymously. In theory, we (Officevibe) could see the results if we really wanted to by diving deep into the database and doing some crazy querying, but trust me, we don’t have time for that.

6. Managers Don’t Act On The Results

This is an important one, and I’ll talk a lot about why I think this is. I often talk about the infographic about employee surveys that we made, because some of the data on there is really interesting. There are five statistics that I want to focus on:

  • Only 1/5 believe their manager would act on what came up in the survey.
  • Twenty percent said their boss never bothered to follow up any concerns raised.
  • Forty-seven percent of managers say that they spend only two to five days a year on activities relating to their annual engagement survey.
  • Twenty-seven percent of managers never review survey results at all.
  • Fifty-two percent reviewed survey results but took no action.

Why Managers Don’t Act

This is a really interesting question that I’ve been thinking about a lot lately. I have to wonder if the stats I presented just before about managers not acting is accurate. It doesn’t make much sense to me.

Managers understand the importance of employee surveys, so why wouldn’t they act? Is it that whatever they were going to implement goes to the bottom of a to-do list? Or is there more going on? I personally have three theories on this.

1. It’s A Perception Problem

This is a very realistic issue, and another reason why doing a survey annually is way too long. It’s very possible that managers are actually acting on the results, but the employees aren’t noticing it. Either because of a lack of communication, or because it’s happened so much later.

A very simple way to improve this issue is to communicate with your employees at every step of the process. Here’s a good rule of thumb: If you think you might be communicating too much, you’re probably not communicating enough. There’s no such thing as too much communication.

2. They Think It’s Enough

I spoke with a friend of mine about a situation at their company, and I found it very interesting. I won’t mention any names out of respect, but what was happening was the managers at the company were implementing changes based on employee feedback, but the employees thought that it still wasn’t good enough.

The manager’s response was that their competition did less, so what they were doing should be good enough. This is a huge mistake that managers make. Don’t compare yourself to your competition, your culture and situation is unique and should be treated that way. Listen to your employees, and keep them happy.

3. Fear Of Change

It’s very possible that managers aren’t in fact acting on any of the information that comes from the annual surveys, simply because they’ll have to change something, and change is hard. Similarly to how people have such a hard time kicking bad habits, I wonder if it’s the same for managers. I wonder if it’s just easier to keep doing the same old thing, knowing it’s wrong, and so they don’t act on the surveys.

The neuroscience of changing your habits is something I’ve been researching a lot on my free time, and it seems like this could be a very real possibility.

The Neuroscience Of Change

The brain is hard-wired to resist change.

The oldest part of your brain is always working to protect you. Our brains are designed to keep us safe. The best way to stay safe is to follow familiar, known paths where you’ve already seen there is no danger.

So when something new comes up, your brain fires up a warning, and you prepare to flee, or fight for your life (fight or flight). Recent research shows that you experience this response any time you encounter a situation that is new or in some way challenging. Our most natural response to trying anything new is to resist it.

The SCARF Model

The SCARF model identifies five domains of social experience that the brain treats as survival issues: status, certainty, autonomy, relatedness and fairness. The SCARF model helps us understand human behaviour during change. It would be wise for managers to have at least a basic understanding of this model to understand how employees will react to what you do.

As a simple example, micromanaging (or lack of autonomy) causes a “threat” response in the brain. Especially at the beginning of change when employees are most resistant, you want to avoid micromanaging them.

Let’s go through each of the five elements quickly.

Status: Status is our perception of how we compare the people around us, and it’s a feeling of being better than or worse than others. We are uncomfortable until there is a clear status arrangement between us and everyone else.

Certainty: Certainty is sort of the core of all of this. We need to feel certain with things, as like I mentioned, we’re hard-wired to resist change, so we need to feel comfortable. The more we can predict the future, the more rewarded we feel. The less we can predict the future, the more threatened we feel. Set clear expectations for your team.

Autonomy: I talk alot about autonomy on this blog because it’s so important. Autonomy is different than certainty in the sense that certainty is knowing what’s coming, whereas autonomy is having control. We feel really threatened when our autonomy is taken away.

Relatedness: This is the mental process we go through to see if someone is similar to us or not. There is a lot of research around how people feel a strong connection to people that are similar to them, and feel a strong disconnection with people that are different (us vs. them mentality).

The trick for leaders is to create shared goals. Get everyone on the same page, focusing on the same mission. Unless a leader creates shared goals across an organization, an organization will be a series of silos. That’s the inherent way that we live. We naturally think in small groups.

Fairness: I’ve written a lot in the past about equity theory, and this is how we judge if we’re being treated fairly or not. In the workplace, this is a little tougher to fix, because there will always be people who are paid more than you and have more perks, but transparency can help with this.

So, What’s The Solution?

Short, frequent pulse surveys that don’t take up too much time.

It takes a real commitment from all senior managers to listen to their employees, and to guide them through the process of change. When survey results come in, share them right away, and be transparent in how you’re planning on addressing these issues.

When you introduce these new weekly surveys, there will be some pushback from employees. At first, they won’t believe that it’s going to work. They need to vent, so be there for them, and tell them that you’re listening. Show empathy, and make them feel like you care about their concerns.

As you keep going, implement small tests to improve things, and constantly solicit feedback for improvements from employees. This will make them happier, more engaged, and more likely to participate in the process.

What Do You Think About Employee Pulse Surveys?

Do you agree that they’re better than annual surveys?

This article was syndicated from Business 2 Community: You Should Switch From Annual Surveys To Weekly Pulse Surveys

More Business & Finance articles from Business 2 Community:

You Should Switch From Annual Surveys To Weekly Pulse Surveys

One thing I’ve never fully understood is why companies are so obsessed with annual surveys.

Annual employee engagement surveys are at the core of every HR department, but this needs to change. Doing a survey once a year is way too long of a timeframe to get any really accurate data.

As leaders, we need to be collecting feedback from our employees way more often. There’s no more waiting in life anymore. In the last few years, we’ve seen a huge shift in the world, everything is happening in real time. I get my news from social media, I can watch whatever I want online, I can find the answer to any question through Google, there’s no more waiting in life anymore, and the same should be true for employee engagement.

Companies have good intentions. The thinking is that by measuring engagement through employee surveys senior management can get insight into what their employees think and what needs to be improved.

While their intentions are good, I think companies are going about it the wrong way. Don’t get me wrong, engaged employees matter, but annual surveys don’t do anything to fix issues when they come up originally.

You want your employees to be engaged, so why not measure and improve engagement on an ongoing basis? Shorter employee pulse surveys are what you should be using instead.

Engaged employees will make your company more money, that’s been proven many times. Here are a few stats that will help prove this point:

  • Fifty-three percent of more than 2,000 U.S. adults surveyed reported that they would remain with their current employers for longer periods of time if they felt like they were more appreciated by their bosses.
  • JDA, a professional services firm, calculated the costs of replacing an employee, and they estimate that it costs up to $150,000 to replace a good employee. While the numbers change depending on the type of job, this is still a good example.
  • A 2009 study by Watson Wyatt showed that highly engaged workers are twice as likely to be top performers, and that three quarters of them exceed or far exceed expectations for performance.
  • A five percent increase in total employee engagement correlates to a .7 percent increase in operating margin.
  • Sears measured that a five point improvement in employee attitudes drove a 1.3 point improvement in customer satisfaction, which in turn drove a 0.5 percent improvement in revenue.
  • Standard Chartered Bank found that branches with a statistically significant increase in levels of employee engagement (0.2 or more on a scale of five) had a 16 percent higher profit margin growth than branches with decreased levels of employee engagement.
  • A study of 64 organizations revealed that organizations with highly engaged employees achieve twice the annual net income of organizations whose employees lag behind on engagement.
  • Fabick CAT, a company that sells, rents, and repairs Caterpillar construction equipment improved “percent of industry net sales” by 300 percent by focusing on employee happiness.
  • Employees with lower engagement are four times more likely to leave their jobs than those who are highly engaged.
  • Highly engaged employees were 87 percent less likely to leave their companies than their disengaged counterparts.

Annual employee surveys are notorious for having incredibly low response rates, averaging around 30 percent based on research I’ve seen. This doesn’t surprise me, since most annual surveys contain up to 100 bland, boring questions.

Plus, with the way most companies operate, they take months simply to generate the reports and analyze the data. Then in classic big company fashion, establish a “committee” to implement changes, which takes another few months. By the time this is all said and done, it’s time to start planning for next year’s survey.

When we were building Officevibe, one of the biggest things we took into consideration was how simply can we display the data for managers, and how fast. The data updates in real time, and we’ve done our best to make it as easy to understand as possible. No confusing buzzwords, just simple, straightforward data that updates as employees answer their questions.

Problems With Annual Surveys

There are so many problems with annual surveys, but here are a few that I can think of off the top of my head.

1. They’re Too Long

Survey fatigue is something that you really need to take into account if you’re creating a survey for your employees. A good question to ask yourself is, would you complete this survey?

According to research I’ve seen, there is a 20 percent abandon rate for surveys that take more than seven to eight minutes to complete. I personally think even that is too long, I would aim for five minutes.

2. They’re Too Infrequent

The problem with doing surveys annually is that you’re not addressing issues as they come up. This is probably the most counter-intuitive thing you can do if you’re trying to improve employee happiness.

If you want to make your employees feel happy, then listen to their feedback in real time (or as close to real time as possible).

3. Too Much Time Passes Before Results Are Shared

Here’s a typical schedule for an annual survey in a typical company:

January: Survey Is Launched
February: Survey Is Due
May: Results Come Out
June: Managers Start Following Up

Again, everything should be done and shared in near real time. By June, that survey you had me do in January is long forgotten about.

4. Employees Perceive No Value

The key word here is perceive (more on this later), but you need to be answering the question of “what’s in it for me”. Why should an employee take time out of their busy day to answer your survey? To win the new iPad? Because you told them so? Think about that answer.

5. Employees Don’t Believe It’s Anonymous

Employees (especially younger ones) are skeptical about survey anonymity because of how knowledgeable they are about the way computers and technology works. With things like NSA spying, Samsung smart TV’s listening to your conversations, and other examples of invasion of privacy, I think they have every right to be skeptical.

That’s why it makes sense to use a third-party, like Officevibe. I can’t stress enough how in Officevibe it truly is an anonymous employee survey. None of the managers that use Officevibe can see any of the individual answers, everything is aggregated anonymously. In theory, we (Officevibe) could see the results if we really wanted to by diving deep into the database and doing some crazy querying, but trust me, we don’t have time for that.

6. Managers Don’t Act On The Results

This is an important one, and I’ll talk a lot about why I think this is. I often talk about the infographic about employee surveys that we made, because some of the data on there is really interesting. There are five statistics that I want to focus on:

  • Only 1/5 believe their manager would act on what came up in the survey.
  • Twenty percent said their boss never bothered to follow up any concerns raised.
  • Forty-seven percent of managers say that they spend only two to five days a year on activities relating to their annual engagement survey.
  • Twenty-seven percent of managers never review survey results at all.
  • Fifty-two percent reviewed survey results but took no action.

Why Managers Don’t Act

This is a really interesting question that I’ve been thinking about a lot lately. I have to wonder if the stats I presented just before about managers not acting is accurate. It doesn’t make much sense to me.

Managers understand the importance of employee surveys, so why wouldn’t they act? Is it that whatever they were going to implement goes to the bottom of a to-do list? Or is there more going on? I personally have three theories on this.

1. It’s A Perception Problem

This is a very realistic issue, and another reason why doing a survey annually is way too long. It’s very possible that managers are actually acting on the results, but the employees aren’t noticing it. Either because of a lack of communication, or because it’s happened so much later.

A very simple way to improve this issue is to communicate with your employees at every step of the process. Here’s a good rule of thumb: If you think you might be communicating too much, you’re probably not communicating enough. There’s no such thing as too much communication.

2. They Think It’s Enough

I spoke with a friend of mine about a situation at their company, and I found it very interesting. I won’t mention any names out of respect, but what was happening was the managers at the company were implementing changes based on employee feedback, but the employees thought that it still wasn’t good enough.

The manager’s response was that their competition did less, so what they were doing should be good enough. This is a huge mistake that managers make. Don’t compare yourself to your competition, your culture and situation is unique and should be treated that way. Listen to your employees, and keep them happy.

3. Fear Of Change

It’s very possible that managers aren’t in fact acting on any of the information that comes from the annual surveys, simply because they’ll have to change something, and change is hard. Similarly to how people have such a hard time kicking bad habits, I wonder if it’s the same for managers. I wonder if it’s just easier to keep doing the same old thing, knowing it’s wrong, and so they don’t act on the surveys.

The neuroscience of changing your habits is something I’ve been researching a lot on my free time, and it seems like this could be a very real possibility.

The Neuroscience Of Change

The brain is hard-wired to resist change.

The oldest part of your brain is always working to protect you. Our brains are designed to keep us safe. The best way to stay safe is to follow familiar, known paths where you’ve already seen there is no danger.

So when something new comes up, your brain fires up a warning, and you prepare to flee, or fight for your life (fight or flight). Recent research shows that you experience this response any time you encounter a situation that is new or in some way challenging. Our most natural response to trying anything new is to resist it.

The SCARF Model

The SCARF model identifies five domains of social experience that the brain treats as survival issues: status, certainty, autonomy, relatedness and fairness. The SCARF model helps us understand human behaviour during change. It would be wise for managers to have at least a basic understanding of this model to understand how employees will react to what you do.

As a simple example, micromanaging (or lack of autonomy) causes a “threat” response in the brain. Especially at the beginning of change when employees are most resistant, you want to avoid micromanaging them.

Let’s go through each of the five elements quickly.

Status: Status is our perception of how we compare the people around us, and it’s a feeling of being better than or worse than others. We are uncomfortable until there is a clear status arrangement between us and everyone else.

Certainty: Certainty is sort of the core of all of this. We need to feel certain with things, as like I mentioned, we’re hard-wired to resist change, so we need to feel comfortable. The more we can predict the future, the more rewarded we feel. The less we can predict the future, the more threatened we feel. Set clear expectations for your team.

Autonomy: I talk alot about autonomy on this blog because it’s so important. Autonomy is different than certainty in the sense that certainty is knowing what’s coming, whereas autonomy is having control. We feel really threatened when our autonomy is taken away.

Relatedness: This is the mental process we go through to see if someone is similar to us or not. There is a lot of research around how people feel a strong connection to people that are similar to them, and feel a strong disconnection with people that are different (us vs. them mentality).

The trick for leaders is to create shared goals. Get everyone on the same page, focusing on the same mission. Unless a leader creates shared goals across an organization, an organization will be a series of silos. That’s the inherent way that we live. We naturally think in small groups.

Fairness: I’ve written a lot in the past about equity theory, and this is how we judge if we’re being treated fairly or not. In the workplace, this is a little tougher to fix, because there will always be people who are paid more than you and have more perks, but transparency can help with this.

So, What’s The Solution?

Short, frequent pulse surveys that don’t take up too much time.

It takes a real commitment from all senior managers to listen to their employees, and to guide them through the process of change. When survey results come in, share them right away, and be transparent in how you’re planning on addressing these issues.

When you introduce these new weekly surveys, there will be some pushback from employees. At first, they won’t believe that it’s going to work. They need to vent, so be there for them, and tell them that you’re listening. Show empathy, and make them feel like you care about their concerns.

As you keep going, implement small tests to improve things, and constantly solicit feedback for improvements from employees. This will make them happier, more engaged, and more likely to participate in the process.

What Do You Think About Employee Pulse Surveys?

Do you agree that they’re better than annual surveys?



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