but-also-notice-the-parallels

anonymous asked:

K, so i had a thought, (really it was someone else's but i don't know who and i agree with them) what if Lincoln is actually Thomas Ward? It sounds crazy, but i have 100% convinced myself. We know that he has a past that the inhumans saved him from, and lincoln is kind of the opposite of ward, he was mislead by jaying and kind of fought skye but realized he was wrong. I also noticed a parallel when lincoln was reacting to jaying killing that agent and ward reacting to garret killing that general

I like it! I’d be here for that storyline.

anonymous asked:

K, so i had a thought, (really it was someone else's but i don't know who and i agree with them) what if Lincoln is actually Thomas Ward? It sounds crazy, but i have 100% convinced myself. We know that he has a past that the inhumans saved him from, and lincoln is kind of the opposite of ward, he was mislead by jaying and kind of fought skye but realized he was wrong. I also noticed a parallel when lincoln was reacting to jaying killing that agent and ward reacting to garret killing that general

Hm, that’s an interesting thought, nonny. I never thought of that before, this is a Whedon show so definitely anything could happen!

!!!!SPOILER ALERT!!!!

“A Monster In Paris” is a 2011 French 3D-animated film distributed by EuropaCorp and produced by a host of French companies and people that I have never heard of…what do you expect? I’m a stupid American!

Here is a movie which is seemingly a bit of a parody-homage to the classic genres of horror films (despite it being a musical comedy family film). In fact, the movie was apparently very loosely based on “The Phantom of the Opera”. In addition, I also notice some interesting parallels to “Beauty and the Beast” and the 1958 scifi horror classic, “The Fly”. In correlation to both “Beauty and the Beast” and “The Phantom of the Opera” the obvious parallel is that you have a beautiful woman who forms a strong bond with a visually horrific creature that has a little more to it than at first meets the eye, and speaking solely of “The Phantom of the Opera” the parallel is that said woman and said horrific creature have a shared passion for music, but regardless of the similarities to the aforementioned movies the lady and the monster are not in love…they’re just good friends. The parallel this film has with “The Fly” is quite literally that both films feature giant human-sized insects…that’s pretty much it.

Another theme reminiscent of “Beauty and the Beast” (namely the Disney version) is the character type found in Commissioner Maynott who is almost like a dead-ringer for Gaston. This would-be hero character would be the knight-in-shining-armor in most cliche olden types of horror and dark fantasy tales, but here he is not more than a pompous delusional egomaniac who serves as this movie’s main conflict…of course to be perfectly fair, I think this dude is a hundred times worse than Gaston. He’s a much bigger asshole…and to top it off he’s a political bureaucrat too! That alone makes him public enemy Number #1 in my book!! And after Maynott becomes hellbent on destroying the creature in order to glorify his own image, it really becomes the classic cliche question of who’s the real monster? A question which has been addressed time and time again so many times throughout various forms of media until any mystery or shock has long faded away. The answer is always going to be man. Man is always the true monster…just like in real life. The Devil himself ain’t got shit on human beings!

In a way, the story is also sort of a parody of many superhero comics as the manner in which Francoeur is transformed is quite similar to many superhero/supervillain creation stories. It’s the timeless cliche of wayward science gone awry. The difference however is that instead of creating a monstrous villain it creates a 7-foot tall musically-endowed flea. It’s both clever and fanciful as well as kinda ironic. It’s one of the many reasons I like this movie. A charming bit of imagination went into the plot; enough that despite this being an oddball amalgamation of prior timeless classics the movie shines as a light-hearted re-imagining of old horror themes. It’s like the story you’ve seen before, but not really.

I also consider it a very creative touch that in spite of all the humanizing characteristics given to Francoeur, speech isn’t one of them. He can’t really talk. He can only sing. Limiting his range of communication to the power of song and nonverbal gestures. Of course I could nitpick about how him being able to sing in fully-formed sentences, play guitar, and understand human language doesn’t make any sense considering the solutions that he was exposed to were only supposed to make him grow and sing well, but then I would just be being over-critical. Nevertheless, I’m left to wonder if the reclusive professor who made those chemicals was supposed to be a scientist or a wizard, because really all that seems more like the work of magic than science.

Speaking of singing, the songs in this movie: “A Monster In Paris” and “La Siene” are without a doubt two of my favorites. “La Siene” is a very spirited jazzy number, while “A Monster In Paris” touches me deep down in my soul and moves me to feelings of grief and pain, because I’m definitely no stranger to being a shunned and misunderstood outcast. I feel for ya, Francoeur! I fuckin’ feel for ya!

The story is also incredible in the sense that this could have easily turned into a horror movie or at least introduce some very dark themes had they brought up the issue of what fleas eat. I’m serious, throughout the whole movie they make a big deal about how Francoeur is harmless and sweet-natured, and while he might be a passive passionate flea with a deep love for music, even fleas have to eat, and that brings up the question of what fleas do eat. Fun nature fact, kids! Fleas are blood-drinking parasites that live off the blood of mammals and birds. A normal-sized flea is a major nuisance to its unfortunate host because their regular feeding leaves unpleasant itchy welts all across the body (much like mosquitoes), but a giant 7-foot tall flea would be a walking hopping blood-sucking nightmare. A few itchy bites would turn into massive blood loss and certain death. We’re talking about a real vampire story…actually somebody should really turn that idea into a movie. There’s something that hasn’t been done before…Giant Vampire Fleas! That would be just the thing to breath some new life into the played-out overdone vampire franchise…that or just add on to the list of low-budget terrible B-movies.

The only real problem I have with this movie is in regards to the obvious gay stereotype whiny French waiter…and not for the reason you might think. I guess this character was meant to be comic relief, but he mostly just comes off as annoying and completely unnecessary. I mean he doesn’t really do anything significant throughout the film; doesn’t aid the plot in anyway. He just whines, constantly speaks in an obnoxiously high-pitched whiny voice, sings terribly, and then tries to rat out Lucille and Francoeur for no reason other than being a spiteful little bitch. It’s not even like he has any justification for being a back-stabbing prick. Hell! Lucille was just being honest when she told him his singing sucked. Get over yourself ya pointy-nosed fag!

So in a sense this movie is basically Phantom of the Opera meets Beauty and the Beast and the Fly. It’s both original and at the same time derivative. The characters are likeable (most of them), the songs are catchy and fun, the story is fast-paced but easy to follow, and the climax is sure to leave you on the edge of your seat…and am I the only one who thinks Francoeur looks a little bit like a 7-foot tall Michael Jackson when he’s wearing that white tuxedo and hat?