but to me it's one of the most important moments in the whole series

Major Discovery: BotW’s Adventure Log = Link’s Diary?!

SERIOUSLY.

(Spoiler Alert)

At this point, our beloved game Breath of the Wild has been out for around half a year already. If you have played the game, you are probably very familiar with the Adventure Log feature in BotW that helps you keep track of all your missions and side quests. Or else its pretty much impossible to remember if you were catching chickens for this guy or collecting weapons to show that kid who’s boss.

But here’s the thing- Have you ever thought about the Adventure Log’s origin? Who or what is helping Link keep track of his missions?

If your answer is the Sheikah Slate or the “system”, which is what I’ve always thought, I’m gonna go ahead and assume you own an European/American copy of the game. Because apparently, in the Japanese version of the game, there is evidence that shows that LINK is the one who wrote the adventure log to keep track of his own journey.

“Ok… So what?”

So Link wrote the Adventure Log. Big deal. It’s not like this is gonna change the gameplay in any way.

…True. However, Link didn’t JUST record his missions in the Adventure Log. According to the Japnese version, Link would often type up some of his own thoughts and comments on what he was doing aside from his current objectives. This could give us a deeper insight of Link’s character.

Here’s an example:

This is what shows up after you complete The Hero’s Sword quest. The content of the two versions are very similar, but notice the use of “自分” (myself) in pic 1. This is evidence that the adventure log is written by Link, who’s talking about himself in first person narrative, instead of “the system”. With that in mind, the Japanese version can be translated to:

(I) Finally retrieved the legendary Master Sword. (I) Don’t know if it’s just an illusion, but the sword itself seems to be delighted about this.

To this moment, Princess Zelda is still inside Hyrule Castle, fighting to suppress the Calamity.

She is still holding on to the faith in me, believing that I will definitely come for her…!

But with the power (that I have) now, can she really be saved (by myself)…?

You see what they did there?

The English version replaced every first person pronoun Link has used with “you”!

As someone who owns an American copy, and has never set the system language to Japanese, I was absolutely SHOCKED when I was told about this (credits at the end).

Remember how we could find diaries of NPCs all across Hyrule? Link’s was right under our noses this whole time!

Now that you know about this, does your adventure log seem a bit different from before?

(I) finished visiting all 13 of the locations in the old pictures. I remembered everything I’ve been through together with Princess Zelda.

In those memories (of mine), Princess Zelda always strived to complete the task burdened onto her…

Even if it’s just a moment sooner, (I) want to save her as quickly as possible

(I) want to see her smile again, with these eyes (of my own).

The translation on this one is just OFF. I can’t believe the English version completely omitted the last part, and replaced it with some kind of mission instruction.

Link has been fighting all this time to see Princess Zelda’s smile again with his own eyes.

 …*sniff*

Not to mention those side quest logs. Once you realize that all of the entries were written by Link himself, the seemingly trivial information recorded in those suddenly opens up so many more hidden sides of Link. It basically re-introduced Link as someone with normal human emotions instead of the silent hero depicted throughout the game.

The caring Link, who was worried about a girl he only met twice for putting herself in danger:

…(I) ventured inside and found part of the Royal Guard’s Series, famous among equipment collectors.

When those were shown to Parcy, the traveler at the stable, her curiosity about it seem to be provoked more than ever (by me). (I) Hope she won’t do anything reckless…


The compassionate Link, who felt glad for other peoples’ happiness:

As a sign of appreciation for bringing the town together and as compensation for the work done (by me), a hefty amount of gems that were unearthed during the town’s construction were given by Hudson (to me).

(I) wish the couple could live happily ever after.


The reckless Link, who apparently felt thrilled when he managed to knock out some monsters with his new companion:

(I) captured the giant horse in Taobab Grasslands

So that’s why. It’s indeed a really big horse. It trampled whatever kind of monster in its way with ease when it galloped. That was really cool.  

When it was brought back to Straia (by me), he was very surprised.


Link the foodie, who carefully noted down new recipes he learned along the way for future use: 

(I) brought Kiana the goat butter and hearty blueshell snail required for cooking seafood paella. She shared some of the dish (with me) as thanks!

/////Recipe/////


The playful Link, who tried to mimic the way Gorons speak- by adding “goron” at the end of every sentence- after he passed the Test of Will and became one of the bros:

……

Ah… (I) kinda want to write down Kabetta’s Bro Motto, but there’s not enough space goron?

That’s too bad goron…


The empathetic Link, who felt nervous for the guy in this side quest, then relieved when the couple finally got together:


…and… THIS:

The last line on the left is the Japanese equivalent of What the heck…

I guess the statue is a bit too weird even for our great adventurer.


Finally, we have the entry that shows up after you complete the DLC trial:

(I) finally conquered the merciless Trial of the Sword.

……

(I believe that) Princess Zelda would be quite happy about how much I’ve improved


As we all know, Breath of the Wild is a game that focuses a lot on the freedom given to the players. Even the main story line is broken down into the form of memories, waiting for the players to find. As the players venture on into the wild, they would eventually find the information they need to learn about this world. The amazing amount of details you can find about Hyrule and its people is an important reason why BotW is so attractive.

On the contrary, the info available about our protagonist is very limited. The only piece of description that directly describes Link is in Zelda’s diary, where she points out that he is a very quiet person, and that’s it for our hero.

…NOT!!

Link had always had the most extensive character description. Right under our noses.

Nintendo got us. They got us GOOD.

But now we know.

SIX months after the game’s launch.

…Better late than never.

End.


P.S.: Fun fact about BotW Link- he seems to like the sand seal game a lot. Of all the entires about racing minigames, the sand seal game is the only one where Link wrote “(I’ll) try to get a better score next time!

He’s so adorable I can’t //////


CREDITS

Disclaimer: I did not discover this.

This discovery was made by a Chinese gamer @atomaruU about a week ago. To make sure that her theory is correct, she cross referenced the English version of the game, only to discover that the language is completely emotionless and robotic. Therefore, to allow more people to see who Link REALLY is, I was asked to write this post based on the Chinese article she published. 

Her Twitter: https://twitter.com/atomaruU

Tweet Link: https://twitter.com/atomaruU/status/902172455661211649

Chinese article Link: http://weibo.com/ttarticle/p/show?id=2309404145837893616605

Pic credits: @lulubuu0609 (She’s an amazing artist btw check out her blog)

Hope you enjoyed this :3    

Negotiations

I walked into the room, avoiding direct eye contact with the alien waiting for me. Its huge eyes just looked like a jet black sclera set in a sack of vaguely damp, wrinkled gray leather. If eyes are a window into the soul, this creepy little guy would give satan a run for his money. They just put me on edge, somehow. I’d have to make eye contact anyway, but it could wait.

I strode up to the meeting table, pulled out the chair, and sat down. I shuffled around in my bag for a moment before pulling out a small piece of tech, which I set on the table in front of me.

“Before we begin, I want to be sure of a few things. This device you’ve provided us with, it is 100% effective at understanding and translating languages, correct?”

The alien across from me nodded. It’s a nice little allowance they’ve made for comfort, learning our body language, but its bulbous head threw the whole gesture off. It made me think of one of those old inflatable toys with a weight on the bottom, that would lean too far to the side before bouncing straight back up. Woobles or something. It didn’t really matter.

“Nearly. We occasionally find a race with one or two concepts that it has trouble with, but that’s easily smoothed over.”

I took a deep breath, and waited a moment to compose myself. This whole thing was going to be more trying than not interrupting old man Higgins up the street while he went on about whatever racist sentiment was in his head at the moment.

“One or two…okay. That’s odd.”

The alien blinked. Eyelids came in from not just the top and bottom, but also the sides. That’s just plain creepy. Reminds me of one of those really old movies they threw on the media blacklist pretty much as soon as first contact started. Something in black. Whatever it was, I remember seeing it as a kid, and that guy at the beginning had nothing on this alien’s eyes.

“Have you already found something it can’t translate?”

I nodded, then pulled out my communicator and scrolled through a few documents. I really needed to clean this thing out. Can’t believe I didn’t get around to it before coming to such an important meeting. Imagine the debacle that would result if I opened exactly the wrong thing. Never can know what that might be, honestly.

“Of a sort, yes. Mind humoring me for a few minutes?”

The alien steepled its hands together, and leaned forward. That’s just plain creepy. I wonder how they learned such context specific body language? Not that it really matters, I guess. Not my problem.

“Certainly. After all, it can take years to accept a race into the Federation.”

Nodding again, I pulled up a document on my communicator, then leaned back in my chair as I began. This was going to be more interesting than that time your classmate Jimmy found some old matches somewhere and almost burned the school down by mistake.

“Excellent. This shouldn’t take much time. I mentioned that we found some issues with your device. Allow me to demonstrate: Espionage.”

The little device on the table beeped, and a red light flashed.

“ERROR: NO ANALOGUE FOUND”

I sighed. That one had been an accident. We just had the thing sitting in a conference room while we discussed the implications of the visit when it came up. But, when something that simple for us to understand came up, we had to try for more.

“Reverse Engineering.”

Again, a beep and a flash of red.

“ERROR: NO ANALOGUE FOUND”

“Spycraft.”

And again with the beep. This was going to get irritating if I didn’t speed things up a bit. Too bad we hadn’t managed to find a mute option for that feature.

“ERROR: NO ANALOGUE FO-”

“Overwhelming Force”

“ERROR: NO-”

“Scorched Earth”

“ER-”

“Kamikaze”

“E-”

Blitzkrieg, Stealth, Mutually Assured Destruction, Acceptable Losses, Pyrrhic Victory, Guerilla Warfare, Encirclement, Entrenchment, Siege.”

The device gave off a series of distressed beeps, punctuated by rapid blinking of the little red light. I almost felt sorry for it. Almost.

“TOO MANY ERRORS DETECTED. REBOOTING. RUNNING SELF DIAGNOSTIC. NO DISCREPANCIES FOUND,”

I paused, and glanced across the table at the alien before looking back down at the translator. This was going to hit it harder than a washed up holovid actor with no auditions and less money hits rock bottom.

“Xenocide”

The chair across from me clattered to the ground as the alien practically fell out of its seat. I don’t blame the poor thing. Of all the aggressive, militaristic words we tried, that was one of the ones we least expected to translate. I mean, really. Who has a word for the intentional extermination of an entire sapient species when they don’t even understand fundamental hostile international mechanics like spying?

“Why do you have a word for…what was all that just now?”

I chuckled a bit while motioning for the alien to sit back down. His reaction had been pretty good, perfectly suitable for one of those hammed-up old dramas where the hero realizes they’ve been working with the villain all along.

“We were confused about that too. So we took a look at the information you sent as part of first contact with us. We noticed something interesting. Every single race in your Federation is carnivorous. Why is that?”

The alien seemed smaller somehow as it settled back into a seat. It looked kind of like a balloon slowly losing air, if that balloon was made of moldering gray leather with eyes that made your spinal column decide it wanted a holiday in Fiji.

“First contact has always been made after sapient races make it to multiple worlds. We’ve never found a sapient herbivorous race which failed to destroy themselves in resource wars and aggressive action. We’ve never found herbivores capable of surviving long enough to leave their own world.”

I leaned forward in the chair and smiled while finally making direct eye contact with the alien. I think the poor thing shivered when I did that. Not that I blame it. Imagine your reaction when you start to put the pieces together and realize that your friendly, upstanding next door neighbor might be the world’s most wanted criminal.

“And the races you have found, while commonly using threat displays, do not waste resources on wars they cannot easily win, correct?”

The alien nodded as it slouched a bit in its chair. It looked kind of like it was trying to hide. Who wouldn’t want to hide from the monsters in their closet?

“Wasted resources means decreased likelihood of survival.”

I shrugged. That was true enough, though rather coldly logical. Dispassionate logic like that has never been our strong suit. Then again, that’s why I’m in this situation in the first place, so it evens out.

“And yet herbivores constantly waste resources on aggression, on movement, on having more young than will possibly survive.”

The alien was staring at me. I’m not sure when the last time it blinked was. I wonder if those eyes need some kind of lubrication to keep from drying out. Probably, they looked a bit less creepy than they should’ve. Looked like they were losing their shine.

“And they die for it. That’s exactly why we’ve never encountered spacefaring herbivores. Their inherent aggression is their own demise.”

I held eye contact. I’d almost swear the alien was a weird statue right now. Don’t know who would commission a statue made of old greasy leather, but I’m sure there’s someone with too much money and too little sense who would give it a shot.

“Indeed. Now, back to the subject at hand. I’ll ask you before we continue: what can you offer humans for joining your Federation?”

The alien sputtered as it started moving again. I’d swear it looked offended. Maybe it doesn’t see where this is going. Not that it really matters, I guess. I mean, it probably matters about as much as posting a formal complaint to a new corporate policy, which is to say not at all.

“We’ve already sent the offer. You’ve seen that, I’m sure.”

I nodded, and began to tap out a staccato rhythm on the table with my fingers. I never could remember where I learned this stupid tune. I’ve known it as long as I can remember, and it just moves into my head on occasion and sticks around like that one couchsurfing friend who doesn’t understand the idea of wearing out their welcome.

“And I’m asking, what else do you have to offer?”

The alien just shook its head again, staring at the device. I wonder if it thought we might’ve tampered with it. As if we knew how. That little thing is way beyond our current abilities. We had some scientists pry it open and look inside, just to be sure.

“Nothing. I’m not sure why you’re-”

I raised my hand, cutting him off. Huh. Not sure why that worked. Did they learn that much of our body language? That’s still really creepy, if it’s the case. Or, maybe I just have it on edge. I dunno. I guess it doesn’t matter.

“May I have permission to connect my datapad with my ship’s computers?”

The alien glanced away from me for a moment. I assume it was checking in with superiors somehow. Maybe it was psychic, to an extent. Or maybe they just had an implant of some sort. We’ll find out eventually, I’m sure.

“Yes, if you like.”

I sighed. I guess that makes things easier for us. I don’t think anyone was going to like what I was about to do. This whole thing felt kind of like one of those holovids of an accident, where you know what’s coming and don’t want to keep going, but for some reason you just can’t seem to stop and pull yourself away.

“Computer, show video: Hiroshima”

A screen appeared in the air above my datapad. It started playing back an old, grainy video. Shaky, taken by hand in an aircraft in a firefight. Below, you can barely see a city being blotted out by a massive explosion. A cloud of smoke, fire and debris was rapidly climbing into the sky, billowing, growing, blooming into an eerie and easily recognized mushroom cloud.

“That’s…you’re using weapons of that scale on a population center? How recent was this?”

I shrugged, and closed the video. The screen on my datapad went back to the document I had up earlier. Gotta love how well they managed to predict this whole thing. I made a mental note to recommend a raise for whoever set up that document for me.

“Three centuries ago. Prior to our invention of spaceflight. Part of a much larger conflict. This is a relatively minor example of “overwhelming force”“

“ERROR: NO A-”

“Shut it. Computer, show infosheet: Battle of Stalingrad.”

A series of graphs and diagrams appeared above my datapad. They showed resources, time, maps, battle plans, and death tolls. Images were interspersed throughout, as were annotations on the tactical value of this, the emotional value of that. Prominent among them was a single apartment building, including notes on sniping from the roof and support via tunnels.

“That…what purpose would that…why w-”

Again, I raised my hand to cut him off, before closing the infosheet. Maybe it was both. Nah, couldn’t be. Only way it was both having this guy on edge and our body language is if it somehow had our body language built in. Unsettling thought, but not exactly likely.

“Because Stalingrad was an advantageous location and the people who died there were considered ‘Acceptable losses’“

“ERRO-”

“Computer, show gallery: General Sherman’s March to the Sea.”

A multitude of images appeared over the datapad. Rail lines and roads intentionally broken and destroyed. Farms and fields scoured clean and left to fallow. Buildings and towns razed to the ground. A broken people left to mourn and starve.

“So much waste…that can’t be intentional, can it?”

I glanced at the images, the wanton destruction that campaign caused, and the very orders that caused it. That kind of thing may be considered morally reprehensible now, even a war crime, but it wasn’t always. At the time, the strategy was extolled as one of the reasons the war ended the way it did.

“It was intentional.”

The alien stared at me, its reflective black eyes bigger than I’d ever seen them before. Creepy as all hell, that’s for sure. I’d rather not deal with these kinds of meetings in the future. Maybe after this I could negotiate for some kind of retirement.

“But…why?”

I tapped my datapad and closed the gallery, then leaned back and tossed my feet on the table. May as well relax, I already knew how this was going to end.

“Because it rendered the enemy unable to use resources Sherman couldn’t keep. Computer, assemble and show video grouping: RTS Games”

A large grid of videos came up, showing a huge range of scenes. Largely battle, the settings varied from open space to deep ocean, from early history to the far “future.” Even battles across space and time could be seen.

“The translator can’t have gotten that right. Those are military tactical simulations. Higher level than anything I’ve ever seen or heard of.”

I laughed as I closed out all of the videos and turned back to the alien. Creepy and unsettling as it might be, I’m pretty sure I was terrifying the poor thing. Not that I really felt sorry for it. Not at all.

“No. They aren’t. Those are games. Toys. For. Fun. And they’re a couple hundred years out of date. From what I’ve seen, nearly every human capable of coherent speech is capable of tactically overwhelming your Federation. And since we’re already here, in space, it’s too late for you to say no. So, I’ll ask again:

What do you have to offer us?”

theguardian.com
Ten things I learned about writing from Stephen King
The novelist James Smythe, who has been analysing the work of Stephen King for the Guardian since 2012, on the lessons he has drawn from the master of horror fiction
By James Smythe

Stephen King is an All-Time Great, arguably one of the most popular novelists the world has ever seen. And there’s a good chance that he’s inspired more people to start writing than any other living writer. So, as the Guardian and King’s UK publisher Hodder launch a short story competition – to be judged by the master himself – here are the ten most important lessons to learn from his work.

1. Write whatever the hell you like

King might be best known – or, rather, best regarded – as a writer of horror novels, but really, his back catalogue is crammed with every genre you can think of. There are thrillers (Misery, Gerald’s Game), literary novels (Bag Of Bones, Different Seasons), crime procedurals (Mr Mercedes), apocalypse narratives (The Stand), fantasy (Eyes Of The Dragon, The Dark Tower series) … He’s even written what I think of as being one of the greatest Young Adult novels of all time: The Long Walk. Perhaps the only genre or audience he hasn’t really touched so far is comedy, but most of his work features moments that show his deft touch with humour. It’s clear that King does what he wants, when he wants, and his constant readers – the term he calls his, well, constant readers – will follow him wherever he goes.

2. The scariest thing isn’t necessarily what’s underneath the bed

Horror is a curious thing. What scares one person won’t necessarily scare another. And while there might be moments in his horror novels that tread towards the more conventional ideas of what some find terrifying, for the most part, the truly scary aspects are those that deal with humanity itself. Ghosts drive people to madness, telekinetic girls destroy whole towns with their powers, clowns … well, clowns are just bloody terrifying full stop. But the true crux of King’s ability to scare is finding the thing that his readers are actually worried about, and bringing that to the fore. If you’re writing horror, don’t just think about what goes bump in the night; think about what that bump might drive people to do afterwards.

3. Don’t be scared of transparency

One of my favourite things about King’s short story collections are the little notes about each tale that he puts into the text. The history of them, the context for the idea, how the writing process actually worked. They’re not only invaluable material for aspiring writers – because exactly how many drafts does it take to reach a decent story? King knows! – but they’re also brilliant nuggets of insight into King himself. Some people might think that it’s better off knowing nothing about authors when they read their work, but for King, his heart is on his sleeve. In his latest collection, The Bazaar of Broken Dreams, King gets more in-depth than ever, talking about what inspired the stories in such an honest way that it couldn’t have come from another writer’s pen. Which brings us to …

4. Write what you know. Sort of. Sometimes

Write what you know is the most common writing tip you’ll find anywhere. It’s nonsense, really, because if we all did that we’d end up with terribly boring novels about writers staring out of windows waiting for inspiration to hit. (If you like those, incidentally, head straight for the literary fiction section of your nearest bookshop.) But King understands that experience is something which can be channelled into your work, and should be at every opportunity. Aspects of his life – addiction, teaching, his near-fatal car accident, rock and roll, ageing – have cropped up in his work over and over, in ways that aren’t always obvious, but often help to drive the story. That’s something every writer can use, because it’s through these truths that real emotions can be writ large on the page.

5. Aim big. Or small

King’s written some mammoth books, and they’re often about mammoth things. The Stand takes readers into an apocalypse, with every stage of it laid out on the page until the final fantastical showdown. It deals with a horror that hits a group of characters twice in their lives, showing us how years and years of experience can change people. And The Dark Tower is a seven (or eight, or more, if you count the short stories set in its world) part series that takes in so many different genres of writing it’s dizzying. When he needs to, King aims really big, and sometimes that’s what you have to do to tell a story. At the other end of the spectrum, some of King’s most enduring stories – Rita Hayworth & Shawshank Redemption, The Mist – have come from his shorter works. He traps small groups of characters in single locations and lets the story play out how it will. The length of the story you’re telling should dictate the size of the book. Doesn’t matter if it’s forty thousand words or two hundred, King doesn’t waste a word.

6. Write all the time. And write a lot

King’s published – wait for it – 55 novels, 11 collections of stories, 5 non-fiction works, 7 novellas and 9 assorted other pieces (including illustrated works and comic books). That’s over a period of 41 years. That’s an average of two books a year. Which is, I must admit, a pretty giddying amount. That’s years of reading (or rereading, if you’re as foolishly in awe of him as I am). But he’s barely stopped for breath. This year has seen three books published by him, which makes me feel a little ashamed. Still, at my current rate of writing, I might catch up with him sometime next century. And while not every book has found the same critical and commercial success, they’ve all got their fans.

7. Voice is just as important as content

King’s a writer who understands that a story needs to begin before it’s actually told. It begins in the voice of the novel: is it first person, or third? Is it past or present tense? Is it told through multiple narrators, or just the one? He’s a master at understanding exactly why each story is told the way it’s told. Sure, he might dress it up as something simple – the story finding the voice it needs, or vice versa – but through his books you can see that he’s tried pretty much everything, and can see why each voice worked with the story he was telling.

8. And Form is just as important as voice

King isn’t really thought of as an experimental novelist, which is grossly unfair. Some of King’s more daring novels have taken on really interesting forms. Be it The Green Mile’s fragmented, serialised narrative; or the dual publication of The Regulators and Desperation – novels which featured the same characters in very different situations, with unsettling parallels between the stories that unfolded for them; or even Carrie’s mixed-media narrative, with sections of the story told as interview or newspaper extract. All of these novels have played with the way they’re presented on the page to find the perfect medium for telling those stories. Really, the lesson here from King is to not be afraid to play.

9. You don’t have to be yourself

Some of King’s greatest works in the early years of his career weren’t published by King himself. They were in the name of Richard Bachman, his slightly grislier pseudonym. The Long Walk, Thinner, The Running Man – these are books that dealt with a nastier side of things than King did in his properly attributed work. Because, maybe it’s good to have a voice that allows us to let the real darkness out, with no judgments. (And then maybe, as King eventually did in The Dark Half, it’s good to kill that voice on the page … )

10. Read On Writing. Now

This is the most important tip in the list. In 2000, King published On Writing, a book that sits in the halfway space between autobiography and writing manual. It’s full of details about his process, about how he wrote his books, channelled his demons and overcame his challenges. It’s one of the few books about writing that are actually worth their salt, mainly because it understands that it’s about a personal experience, and readers might find that useful. There’s no universal truths when it comes to writing. One person’s process would be a nightmare for somebody else. Some people spend years labouring on nearly perfect first drafts; some people get a first draft written in six weeks, and then spend the next year destroying it and rebuilding it. On Writing tells you how King does it, to help you to find your own. Even if you’re not a fan of his books, it’s invaluable to the in-development writer. Heck, it’s invaluable to all writers.

Your senior year roommate calls herself Clarity. She’s very small and rumpled and distant, and she goes for long walks in the forest south of campus when she’s frustrated. You aren’t friends, but you coexist peacefully. It’s enough.

The creature on your co-owned Walmart futon isn’t Clarity.

It looks like her. Enough to fool a casual observer, certainly. Enough to fool someone who hasn’t been soldering sterling silver for six hours. But you have, and the truth of silver lingers, and the Thing That Looks Like Clarity is sprouting delicate flowers from the skin of its bare shoulders.

It’s sitting cross-legged and perfectly, terribly still, tracking your eyes as you take all this in. When you sigh and set down your backpack, it says, “Hello, smith. There didn’t seem to be any sense in pretending.”

“Jeweler,” you say, and, “I go by Florence, these days. What should I call you?”

It blinks, languid and slow. “I’m not here to usurp. I’m a… placeholder.”

“It’s still confusing as shit, my guy.”

It considers this at length. Finally, with the air of one who has just solved a great puzzle, it says “Claire. We will know, the two of us.”

“Works for me. Nice meeting you, Claire.”

And that seems to be all there is to say. Your roommate’s been stolen by the Fair Folk, you’re living with a changeling, and there’s not much you can do about either of these things. You scroll through Instagram until it gets tired of watching you and wanders out into the hallway.

So that’s Claire.

Keep reading

Rambling about Reigen

Okay, so i really like the popularity of the whole Reigen is asexual headcanon. 

For a lot of reasons. so I’m going to ramble for a bit. not just about that, but also about Reigen and friendship in general.

One thing being; he’s not the sort of character that usually gets seen or portrayed as asexual. He’s not innocent or childish or naive in any way. He’s a sly con man whose greatest weapon is his words and he isn’t above outright manipulation. but he’s also a character who places great importance on being a responsible adult, and damn well tells off adults who pick fights with children. 

But he’s also really lacking in personal connections, and throughout the series thus far has shown no interest in forming romantic relationships, never so much as acting flustered or infatuated around anyone even as a gag. 

but while he has shown no interest in romance he also seems to neglect most other relationships too, but seemingly unintentionally. his neglect of his friendships, unlike his lack of interest pursuing romance, is something that it’s often shown he regrets.

His only real interpersonal connection in the series is with Mob (and Dimple) for the longest time, and after they fall out and we find out more about Reigen’s life outside of his connection to Shigeo we also find out more about the people he knows:

The closest thing he has to friends are a bar full of easily manipulated and flakey people, who turn on him the moment the whole media scandal starts. 

But what makes this different to most ‘loner’ asexual stereotypes is the fact that Reigen is actually incredibly adept at understanding people and isn’t socially inept at all, in contrast to Mob (who in further contrast, is also really good at making friends despite his social ineptitude). 

His main downfall really is that he can be a bit too dismissive of the people he actually cares about at times, both intentionally and unintentionally. Which affects the few interpersonal connections he really does care about since he does take them for granted at times, first with mob in the separation arc, and later in a much more minor way with Serizawa, when Reigen waits until the last minute before asking to hang out with Serizawa for new years:

Serizawa is so important to me as a character, but in regards to Reigen he’s also Reigen’s first real adult friend/employee in the entire series. so while minor, this incident does inform us of quite a bit in contrast to the start of the seperation arc. For one, Reigen accepts the rejection much better than when Mob told him he was busy that time, and even though Serizawa is just as, if not more socially inept than Mob, Reigen doesn’t dismiss his claim of having other friends. So, character growth!

The fandom likes to joke about it a lot, but Reigen has become a beacon of “Dad” to all the kids in the series, as well as the adults who act like kids if i’m honest! (looking at Claw with that statement) And despite being a fraud he’s the one everyone comes to for help, adults and kids alike. 

He’s the person the former Claw members go to at the start of the second Claw arc in order to get help, same with Teru. He’s the one Mob calls to take him and his friends out alien hunting rather than asking his parents. And he’s the one who solves the problems of so many other people in the series using words or plain old common sense. He may not go about things in the most ethical way, but he always honestly tries to leave people in a better place than where they started, even if that involves manipulation.

All in all he’s a unique and complex character, and honestly I couldn’t support the ace Reigen headcanon more. 

anonymous asked:

Do you know what the first big movie novelisation was? Were they ever a big cultural force or just something that existed but no one really cared about?

Before I go into the history of the novelization (and its cousin, the comic adaptation), let me give a couple of recommendations of a few that are better than the movie itself or are just worth reading: Peter David’s novelization of Return of Swamp Thing turned a just-okay so-so movie I forgot the instant I left the theater into something very beautiful, poignant, charming and wonderful. It was all little tweaks, tiny little nudges that made individual moments that fell flat turn into something that worked. It’s amazing how few changes he made to make this story the best possible version of itself, though there were some things the novelization had that made it brilliant and surreal and even experimental, like for instance, Peter David made Alan Moore, Swamp Thing writer, an actual character in the story itself, a clerk at a motel who makes creepy and cryptic foreshadowing comments all through the story.

The novelization of the “meh” Jaws rip-off Orca by Arthur Herzog is a great book because it a tight thriller that gets us right into the head of the orca whale who wants to kill the whaler who murdered his family. Scenes that were maudlin are very moving in prose, with a whale mourning her dead baby and mate, and the hunter is even more tragic when we get into his head and see his remorse. It was like the whale started to represent his guilt. By contrast, the only part of the movie I remember is when the killer whale sets fire to an entire town. 

The novelization of the Flash Gordon movie is extraordinary because it contains explicit sex scenes. The talk is that it was based on an extremely horny early script for the film where it was a European scifi sexploitation romp like Barbarella or Lexx. Hahahaha, can you just imagine being some eleven year old who bought Flash Gordon because he liked the cool space movie only to find a chapter with a blowjob scene in a seraglio?

The whole idea behind Buckaroo Banzai: Across the Eighth Dimension is that it’s actually part 7 of a long running movie series that doesn’t exist, so there are lots of “hey, look, it’s him!” cameos to people we never saw before and tons of lore that just sat in the background. Buckaroo Banzai is a test I use to see if someone’s sense of humor is compatible with mine. So it stands to reason that the novelization, which is more information rich, is a delight for fans of the series. It’s like the only expanded universe product for something that never got an expanded universe. It has details like the fact that Pecos (briefly mentioned as being in Tibet in the film) is actually one of the few Hong Kong Cavaliers to be a woman, and she was in Tibet searching for Buckaroo’s archenemy Hanoi Xan. 

While I wouldn’t say that the novelization of Star Trek: the Motion Picture is better than the movie, exactly, it was written by Gene Roddenberry himself, and had one especially weird fourth wall breaking passage that seemed to be a shout out to the slash-writers, where Captain Kirk says “hey, I don’t know where this idea comes from, but I am super-straight, you guys, seriously. I am only attracted to women.” The novelization also was interesting in that we learned a bit more about Lieutenant Ilea’s empathic powers, which are fundamentally non-visual and we only got a vague sense of in the film. She received emotional signals very much like Deanna Troi later would, and she was not only a receiving empath but a projecting one: we learned that Mr. Sulu, from a less sexually evolved race than Deltans, couldn’t stop picture her naked. 

Finally, getting back to Peter David again, who is like the Phillip K. Dick or Michelangelo of this medium, his novelization of Spider-Man 3 is better than the movie. Moments that fail in the book work there. 

As for the history of the novelization, you have to try to imagine a world where you can’t see a movie whenever you want to. You can only see it when it’s in theaters for a few weeks or when it comes on TV years later. Therefore, novelizations and comic adaptations are designed to replicate the experience of going to the theater. In that sense, they’re almost a relic, technologically speaking, of a time before video and on demand. Fun fact: in the late 1970s, Marvel Comics had a ton of cash problems, and the only thing keeping the lights on was the money made by movie adaptations of things like Logan’s Run.  

Novelizations are extremely old: they go back to the 1920s, and one interesting example is the 1925 Tod Browning film London After Midnight, a horror film that no copies of exist at all and is a “lost film,” but because of the novelization (and a ton of still images during production), we nonetheless know what the plot of the movie is pretty well, to the point that the London After Midnight vampire is almost as iconic as other monsters, despite the fact no one has seen the actual film in decades.

To directly answer your question, the first big book novelization was actually for King Kong in 1933 by Delos Lovelace, which came out the year the movie did. The public went mad for King Kong and the book sold in the millions. It cemented the idea that the novelization is a pretty standard tie-in for a film release, and it’s the most important tie in novel ever written.

An Analysis on the Sexualities of Tweek and Craig

Quick Introduction

Spoiler: This analysis reaches the conclusion that both of these characters are gay. But not just that they’re gay. That homosexuality is “the point”. If I were to start this analysis by saying their sexualities don’t actually matter in the grand scheme of things, I’d be a liar (based on my observations made in this analysis). And I’m not just talking about their homosexuality mattering in terms of representation. Their homosexuality matters in terms of mattering to South Park. Don’t get what I mean? That’s what this analysis is for and that point will be made especially clear in the last section.

Before I can get to that big chunk of meta, I will also be going over the character sheets.

First of all. I will NOT touch anything pre-Tweek x Craig. This is why I dislike my old analysis, it draws too many points from old episodes. To try and make a statement about modern canon using old information is to assume there is intended continuity that goes years back. And in this case, it also assumes Matt and Trey seriously thought about the sexualities of these two minor characters before Tweek x Craig. And being honest, I don’t think Matt and Trey thought about Tweek and Craig much in general before TxC. Craig didn’t have his modern characterization fully established until “Pandemic” (he was mostly just a rival to the main four before then) and Tweek just straight up stopped existing for years.

I also won’t go into Tweek x Craig because I think plenty of people have hit upon that episode already (including myself in my old analysis on Tweek). If you want to see the points I made on Tweek from that episode, here you go . 


  Them as Superheros and the Character Sheets

On to the character sheets! These (obviously) aren’t all of them, but they are the only ones relevant to this analysis. 

It’s obvious these sheets aren’t completely accurate. The only straight Cartman is and will ever be is a straight up liar. But I don’t think that makes ALL of these sheets inaccurate. Making a superhero persona =/= always making a character completely distinct from who you actually are (though you COULD do that). Think of an actual superhero with a secret identity. When we talk about something like Batman and Bruce Wayne, are we talking about two distinct characters or are they ultimately the same character leading a double life? Easy. The latter. So it’s fair to say some of the kids treated their superhero personas that way. But how do you determine how the kids went about their superhero identities?

Let’s look at Kyle. He went all out with making his character and at one point, even directly says he dropped some of his personal information in favor of making his superhero more believable as an alien. 

That makes the rest of his character sheet questionable as to whether or not the information applies to KYLE, not Human Kite. Maybe he came up with an asexual gender-neutral alien race? Or maybe Kyle really IS asexual? It’s hard to say. The point is that this character sheet is for sure not completely accurate to who Kyle actually is. He treats Human Kite as someone distinct from himself as an actual person. Because of that, the things on his character sheet should be taken with a grain of salt.   

Now let’s look at Tweek and Craig. These two, unlike the others, tie in their superhero personas to who they actually are. How can I say that for sure? Because they literally put their actual names into the names of their superhero personas.

Because they keep their real names in their superhero names, that’s a pretty big indication these superhero personas aren’t meant to be completely distinct from them as people. And there’s nothing from the superhero histories they came up with or in the game dialogue to suggest they’re meant to be distinct. They’re just Tweek and Craig, now with super powers. 

Though of course, those sheets and this explanation of them aren’t quite solid enough proof to end this analysis at that. But I do think the argument is solid enough to not toss the character sheets aside as completely invalid. They make excellent tools for comparing what’s claimed on the sheets and what the characters show in behavior. 

But I’m not done here with their superhero personas. This IS an analysis on the sexualities of Craig and Tweek so it would be criminal not to bring this up. Wonder Tweek most likely based his costume and powers more on Wiccan than any other superhero, despite naming himself after Wonder Woman. Here is a fantastic post on that 

Why does that matter here? Because Tweek skipped over modelling his costume and abilities after the big name superheroes and wanted to be more like Wiccan, an explicitly gay superhero who isn’t well known. Kids often admire and make role models out of characters they can see a part of themselves in. Tweek found this powerful superhero character that shared something big in common with him, so he wanted to use Wiccan as a model for his own superhero persona. Like how many little girls like dressing up like Wonder Woman. Which, to me, is very adorable and heartwarming. 


The Subject of their Sexualities within the Series

On to the last point. The idea of them liking strictly boys is something the series likes to come back to. Even if they’re things meant to make you laugh more than anything. Whether it’s Craig bringing the subject up for no apparent reason and bluntly saying “I’m gay” in his monotone voice, or Tweek not bucking out extra cash to impress a flirty waitress who wears her shorts extra tight and short and then at another point proclaiming his love for “sausage” - the writers bring you back to the idea that “Yes, they’re GAY”. This type of content wouldn’t be thrown in if they intended for you to think otherwise. 

And I’m not just talking about bringing the fandom (who are watching this stuff more closely) back to the idea of them being gay, I’m talking about the average viewer. I’ve seen quite a few playthroughs where seemingly more casual fans laugh at how awkwardly Craig brings the subject up and how straight forward he is. Or ignore the notes the Raisins Girls have on Dog Poo and Butters, but then chuckle once they see Tweek’s. These scenes serve to remind the audience as a whole that these characters are gay (using humorous methods to do so - this is a comedy after all).

I’m pretty sure everyone has noticed how much the others characters love to point out that Tweek and Craig are gay at any chance they get. They’re constantly referred to as “gay” or “homosexual”. It’s constantly thrown in at complete random, with even the news anchor from “Put it Down” calling Tweek a “young homosexual boy”. Almost seems like they’re trying to rub these two characters being gay into our faces doesn’t it? 

Because that’s EXACTLY what they’re doing. And here’s where the meta comes in. When those other characters remind you that Tweek and Craig are gay, that’s SOUTH PARK reminding you that they’re gay. 

Looking back at the Tweek x Craig commentary reveals these reminders are intentionally brought up a lot and serve to work as parodies. Here’s a quote from the commentary: “It’s basically kind of the show saying look how cool and up to date we are! We now have a gay couple on it and it shows how proud shows can be of themselves for having gay couples.” Link to the commentary  

Matt and Trey describe the excitement of the townspeople as being a metaphor for the show itself being excited and proud to have gay characters. The moments after TxC meant to remind you that these two are gay are a continuation of the show proudly showing off its gay characters and the fact that they’re gay. 

Like I said earlier. The show strongly wants you to know that they’re gay. And at the rate they’re going, an analysis like this one will eventually be completely unnecessary in telling you that Tweek and Craig are gay. Because that’s something that’s only going to grow increasingly more blatant as the show goes on. 

In conclusion, both of these characters are super gay and that super gayness is super important to their now more prominent roles in South Park.

Critical Role and Queer Perspective

There’s a little Critical Role analysis I’ve been thinking about that probably won’t fit in my thesis, mostly because it’s too narrow in scope. I wanted to talk about it, though, because it’s been one of the most interesting transitions to watch in terms of how the show thinks about its queer characters.

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My top 10 Magical Girl anime

Its no secret that I LOOVE Magical Girls. Heck, just look at my screen name. Here are my top 10 favourite Magical Girl anime.

10. Revolutionary Girl Utena

Lets start with one of the most unique and complex shojo anime and manga series ever. I myself am not sure if this qualifies as an MG anime but I’ve seen many people say it is so its on the list. Anyone who thinks all shojo is the same should watch this show. By the end, you’ll be left wondering if its even a shojo. It starts off fairly lighthearted but by episode 9, it gets serious and the plot starts picking up. Plus, it features some of the most complex characters ever and it touches on some serious subjects like incest and sexual abuse. I must warn you though, its not for everyone because of the reasons I just mentioned. If you’re someone who’s extremely uncomfortable with sexual abuse and incest, I’d recommend you skip this anime.

9. Princess Tutu

Just looking at the title of this anime is enough to send some people running away and judging it. But don’t let the cute name fool you. This is one of the most misleading anime ever. Like Utena, its a shojo but its fairly dark and has some tearjerking moments. But it also has its fairly lighthearted moments and that’s something I like about this anime. The ending is also bittersweet and will leave you wondering how an anime about a duck who becomes a ballerina managed to make you cry.

8. Tokyo Mew Mew

Looking back at this anime, maybe its not exactly the best. Its got its fair share of problems like how the main character, Ichigo, took most of the spotlight. But I still have a soft spot for this anime mainly because its really adorable to watch when you’re feeling sad. And the whole concept of these animal themed Magical Girls sounds interesting. What I love about this anime is how unlike the manga, it fleshed out the other girls as well. We found out a lot about Mint, Zakuro, Lettuce and Pudding and we loved them. I also loved how Ichigo DIDN’T choose the bad boy (Kisshu) over the nice guy (Masaya). In the end, she’s the one who chooses who’s best for her. So, even with all its problems, I have a soft spot for this anime.

7. Shugo Chara

Another anime that does have its fair share of problems but I enjoyed it nonetheless. What I loved most about it was the main character, Amu Hinamori. Some people may use the dreaded M word on her, but I think she’s a wonderfully complex character and one of the most unique Magical Girl leads. I also loved all the Magical Boys (Tadase, Ikuto etc). Though I will say, it didn’t need all that romance drama. I’m one of those people who doesn’t ship Amu with anyone and prefers her as a girl who tries to find herself before going into romance. 

6. Little Witch Academia

Ah yes, one of the most recent anime. I got into it via the OVAs and I watched the anime when the second season was still airing. It was very different from the OVAs but I still loved it. Its animation and art style are amazing and breathtaking to look at and overall, it just feels like a magical experience. The main character, while she might be a typical cheery MG protagonist, is charming in her own way and the amount of growth she undergoes is amazing. In a way,, she kinda reminds me of Doremi Harukaze. Speaking of which…

5. Ojamajo Doremi

This is one of the cutest anime I’ve ever seen . The character designs are all adorable and the transformation is short and simplistic rather than a long, flashy transformation. And while it remains a cute witch anime, it also handles some rather heavy topics like divorce, miscarrige and even cancer. Seriously, a character dies of cancer and she’s only 9! But it still remains a cute show, despite the tearjerking moments. 

4. Cardcaptor Sakura

I recently finished this anime and I loved every moment of it. It is a really cute anime with a simple art style, great animation and amazing characters. It also did a lot of things differently from other Magical Girl shows, like how Sakura doesn’t have a transformation scene and gets all her outfits made by Tomoyo and how there’s no antagonist. Eriol did come close but in the end, he had to do it for Sakura’s own good. What I loved about it most was how it didn’t forget its non magical characters. Tomoyo is obviously important, but Sakura’s other friends all have their own stories and personalities as well. Also, it features one of the cutest couples in anime history. I can’t wait for the new anime to come.

3. Puella Magi Madoka Magica and Yuki Yuna is a Hero

Yep, its a tie. I’ve seen people fight over which of these two is better. Madoka fans claim Yuki Yuna is a ripoff and Yuki Yuna fans list of a million reasons why its so much better than Madoka. Personally, I love both anime. They’re both good in their own rights. Besides they’re similar in a lot of ways. They both have great animation, amazing characters, an interesting and compelling story and many emotional moments. They both have their flaws but all in all, they’re both great. Why can’t people just see that instead of fighting over which is the better dark MG?

2. Pretty Cure

The big Magical Girl powerhouse in Japan. Pretty Cure may be a cash cow franchise made to sell toys but that doesn’t mean it isn’t good. Yes, it has 14 seasons now and that amounts to a lot of characters. But that’s what I like about it. It has a wide range of protagonists. You have sporty protagonists like Nagisa and Hibiki, shy ones like Tsubomi, determined ones like Haruka and smart ones like Mana (much as I don’t like her). They may not all be well developed but with all the wide range of characters, kids will surely find at least one character to relate to. Plus, the series has this special thing that makes me happy, no matter how sad I might be. It just inspires me to someday, make a Magical Girl show of my own. I find this happiness even in some of the weaker seasons like DokiDoki and Happiness Charge. The gif I used is from my favourite season, Go!Princess Pretty Cure. Princess Peach should take lessons in self defence from Cure Flora. 

1. Sailor Moon

I know, I know. Very obvious choice. But like many others, Sailor Moon got me into Magical Girls. Not only that, it got me into other anime as well. It may be cliched now but it still has a special place in my heart. With amazing and strong characters, great storylines and splendid transformation scenes, its no wonder this show had a big impact on the genre. Even with its problems, it is my favourite anime and manga series ever. And yes, that includes Sailor Moon Crystal.

Honourable mention

Mermaid Melody: Pichi Pichi Pitch

This is actually the second Magical Girl anime I’ve watched, after Sailor Moon. It has its problems and its a bit cheesy but I loved the concept of mermaids turning into idols. Its an amazing combination of the Magical Girl and Magical Idol genres.

Honestly,

shout out to @losersclubbb because this is something they made me think of. This is very long and I’m not the least bit fucking sorry!

Okay, but IMAGINE if “It” was a TV show, or a Netflix/Hulu/SOMETHING series. Like “Stranger Things”, each episode is about an hour, and it’s a sci-fi crime show. It shows how the kids all meet up, and there’s more time to develop their characters and reveal their back stories and get things made more accurately. The whole series is just in depth on their lives, and a little less outright horror and more head-scratching mystery. 

Like they all decide the Loser’s Club is a crime solving group, dedicated to finding the missing kids and taking care of each other. Like every few episodes there’s a filler where you just find out more about the target character of that episode while they’re out doing normal kid things, and to reign it back to remind you it’s technically suspense/crime, at the end of the filler episodes they’re brought back to reality by a Pennywise sighting, or a red balloon. 

When I say backgrounds I mean backgrounds- on everyone! The Bower’s Gang is NOT exempt because they deserve to be recognized wholly as King made them to be. Their parents will be included too so we can see how they were raised! Know who else isn’t exempt? PENNYWISE AND HIS FUCKING UNIVERSE PIE HOLE. The kids will unravel much more about him in the show than in the movie, including his backstory and how he came to be. And including that nightmare fest in his face. 

Speaking of, they find out mid-series that he’s NOT human, that these crimes are being committed by another entity entirely. They had no idea at first, thinking this mad man was just appearing dressed as a clown or leaving balloons. Once they know more about who they’re dealing with, he decides to let them know about what he knows- turning into their worst fears and taunting them. He taunts them for their most canon fears in the book, Richie and clowns and werewolves, Eddie and disease and his sexuality, (which, by the by, he’s GAY), Beverly and adulthood and her father, etc, etc, etc.! 

It shows them most detailed in kicking his ass in the sewers as a final show down kinda thing, taking up at least a full episode, preferably two, that way the final showdown with the kids is like its own movie. Any time they interact with him, it should have at least a few moments from Penny’s POV, chasing the kids, getting into their heads, seeing exactly the thoughts that give them their fears. (Also since this is really me and I’m biased, I want Eddie to be crushing on Richie, and Richie crushing back, but they don’t date because that’s not super accurate by any means, but the tension and the love is THERE)(And Pennywise is an asshole and uses that to his advantage of FUCKING COURSE)

ANYWAYS YEAH. They have the season finale two-episode special on kicking his ass and the blood oath. Then when the season comes back as adults, it’s all over again- just as much detail into their adult lives, what they’ve been up to, what they’ve missed. Falling back into familiar friendships, relearning the town and Pennywise and each other. I fully support the idea of Reddie becoming an unspoken thing as it’s canon they kinda do and Eddie is very unhappily married. They basically just have touching scenes and yes some filler episodes but not as many and they aren’t as light hearted, more to get the drama of their personal lives and “normal” lives outside of this fleshed out. 

Stan does die before the reunion, and they take a whole episode for him and his story, showing flashbacks of his life as he would think back on them after getting that call, all of his important moments and achievements captured because he is such a beloved and valuable part of the Loser’s Club even if he isn’t in the story as long. They do show him die, and the trauma of it, because his death should not be understated or glossed over. They take another whole chunk of the reunion episode itself for the Losers themselves to reminisce on him and how much they adored him and how much they’ll miss him, going over his proudest moments, and his silliest. 

Eddie does die in the sewer showdown part 2, in Richie’s arms as in the book, but HE FINISHES HIS FUCKING LAST WORDS AND GUESS WHAT HE’S CONFESSING HE’S BEEN IN LOVE WITH RICHIE THIS WHOLE TIME, AND RICHIE SAYS THAT’S WHY HE NEVER GOT MARRIED, THAT HE MAY HAVE FORGOTTEN LIKE THEY ALL DID, BUT THAT HIS SOUL DID NOT AND IT WAS WAITING FOR HIM. THEY ALSO DO NOT LEAVE HIM IN THE FUCKING SEWER. 

THEY BEAT THAT HONKY SIX PIECE CHICKEN MCNOBODY BALDY MONSTER, THEY GET OUT, THEY HAVE A FUNERAL FOR EDDIE, AND RICHIE GETS THEM MATCHING PROMISE RINGS AND BURIES ONE WITH EDDIE AND WEARS THE OTHER ONE AND VISITS HIM EVERY GODDAMN YEAR. THE LOSERS ALL STAY FRIENDS AND THE SERIES ENDS ON 2 FILLER EPISODES, EACH DEDICATED TO THE REMAINING KIDS MAKING THEIR LIVES BETTER- BEVERLY AND BEN GET MARRIED BY THE WAY, AND A BONUS EPISODE OF THEIR FONDEST MEMORIES ALL PUT TOGETHER LIKE A VINTAGE HOME VIDEO, GRAINY AND SLIGHTLY DISCOLORED SOMETIMES, BUT FILLED WITH LAUGHTER AND JOY AND SHENANIGANS, BECAUSE THESE KIDS ARE NOT THEIR TRAUMAS, NOT THEIR FLAWS. THESE KIDS ARE NOT JUST MONSTER KILLERS, THEY ARE HUMAN, AND THEY HAD BEAUTIFUL TIMES TOO. 

BONUS BONUS, THE CREDITS SHOW THE SAME NOSTALGIC VIDEO OF THE CAST INTERACTING AND BEING THEMSELVES BEHIND THE SCENES AND IT’S SO TOUCHING THAT EVERYONE FUCKING CRIES WHEN THE SERIES IS OVER, TEARY KIDS AND ADULTS ALIKE ALL HUGGING AND LAUGHING AND SAYING THAT THIS WAS THE BEST PROJECT OF THEIR LIVES. EVERYONE WATCHING AT HOME IS FUCKING OBLITERATED IN A MESS OF TEARS AND EMOTIONS. THE FUCKING END. 

13 Reasons Why: Trigger Scenes

For those of you interested in watching this show but fear that certain scenes within the series might cause you harm. I’ve compiled a list of the start & end times of certain scenes that may be too graphic. Below the cut I’ve also decide to include a transcript of important voiceovers that happen during the scenes themselves that you may want to read (but not if you believe they might harm you emotionally) for plot purposes. So just fyi there will obviously be spoilers below the cut lol. I’m pretty certain I got all the majorly triggering scenes, however this whole series does contain little potentially triggering things including: Bullying, slut-shaming, closeted-gay, a second suicide attempt that isn’t explicitly shown but mentioned in the 12th and 13th episodes. So Please take the utmost precaution when watching this series. 

But with all that said, I do hope you enjoy it. I’m tagging those who either replied, reblogged, or liked my original post on the subject so that they can find this easily. 

@madelyne-pryor @sublimelem0n @dana-in-wonderland 
@decembervesalius @dominoswif @whoaheather

Episode 9 – Sexual Assault

1. 31:20 – 32:40 

This scene sets up the assault scene and has a semi-misleading depiction of who the attacker is. The scene shows no actual assault but alludes to what will happen next. For safety’s sake do not view this scene if you are easily triggered by the theme of sexual assault. 

2. 38:50 – 42:35

This scene depicts the full assault. The time I’ve listed above starts and ends at the safest spot to skip to. However, if you are feeling okay enough to watch everything in the scene except the actual assault those times are 40:20 – 41:30. But again please be very careful and don’t push yourself too much. Your mental health is the priority here. This scene is told from the point of view of Hannah Baker hiding in a closet. 

3. 46:40 – 47:02

This is another semi prelude scene to the assault. It shows someone attempting to stop the assault, but failing and giving up. 

4. 50:20 – 51:20 

This is another scene of the assault, however this time it depicts a flashback from the point of view of the victim of the assault rather than Hannah’s account of it. This scene is intensely more graphic than Hannah’s pov, and I extremely urge you to take caution with this scene.  

Episode 12 – Sexual Assault and Child Abuse

5. 00:40 – 01:10

There is a brief but immediate flashforward scene depicting flashes of the assault. This begins immediately after the credits play so please be very careful here. 

6. 42:15 – 47:30

The assault itself doesn’t take up the entire time that I’ve listed, but it cuts in and out with Clay confronting the rapist, including a very bloody fight. So I figured the safest way to avoid the triggering scene would be to avoid that whole sequence. However after the ‘end time’ I listed Clay does get the rapist to finally admit he did it. But if you do not want to see this either please skip to 50:25. If you would like to see the Clay-Only scene also these are those times: 43:30 – 45:45.

7. 51:00 – 52:25

This scene involves one of the characters being choked by the boyfriend of their mother. Please view with caution.

Episode 13 – Suicide 

8. 35:45 – 38:53

This is inarguably the most graphic scene in the entire series and really in a show period that I’ve personally seen. So please take extreme caution if you are going to try and view this scene. On the one hand I believe it was important because non-suicidal people need to see it so they can understand what it’s really like. They need to be forced out of their comfort zone so they don’t just continue ignoring things like this and say shit like “It was their choice; Nothing ____ could have done” and “Suicide is selfish” But if you are suicidal or have ever been suicidal I please urge you not to watch this scene if it may cause you harm. Please be cautious and safe. Your mental health is super important. No movie or show is worth jeopardizing it. In the times above I’ve included everything from the moment she enters the bathroom to right after her body is found by her parents. 

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Cursed Child Scorbus Rec List

This really has become more of an index than a rec list, with categories of: 

Full length chaptered stories, Series, arcs, collections and short chaptered stories, Atmospheric, poetic, ficlets and drabbles, Pre-slash, Fluff, Established relationships, Flangst, Dark Angst, Humor, Holidays, Coming Out, Smut, Fix-Its/Re-Writes, and AUs

Last time I counted there were over 200 fics on here!

Basically my requirements for this list are:
Is it Cursed Child compliant, in the CC universe or do the characterizations feel close enough to CC?
No disturbing side-pairings or themes (i.e. no dub-con, abuse, drug use, infidelity or major character death. Exceptions will have warnings.)
Is it decently written, easy enough to understand and not cringe-worthy?
Did it make me smile or feel things?
Have I actually read it?

There are many stories, especially multi-chapters and WIPs, that I haven’t gotten around to yet, so this list is mostly made up of one-shots. It is my New Year’s resolution to read longer works. Feel free to add your recommendations in your reblog! Happy Holidays you wonderful little fandom! 

Note: I have categorized these fairly loosely. Some fics may fit into more than one category, but I don’t list them twice unless they are individual parts of an arc. The first section is uncategorized. They are a few of my faves, though I definitely have favorites in other categories like atmospheric and fluff, however these ones seemed slightly more complex and are a bit longer. So consider this category…


A Good Place to Start

*Best Mates- picascribit

“You deserve to be with someone who really likes you. Who thinks you’re brilliant.“

Scorpius grinned. “I’ve got you for that.”

One of the first Albus/Scorpius stories I read after CC, and still one of my favorites. This is Part 1 of Pica’s Scorbus Arc, but it is perfect as a stand-alone. The stories do get more mature.

*The First Date- rainystreetlights

“Still under the impression that you should have been the first to get a girlfriend eh? What can I say… Ladies love me.”

“Ladies tolerate you.”

‘One-Shot set in Albus and Scorpius’ sixth year at Hogwarts. When Rose doesn’t show up, Albus and Scorpius end up going on an accidental first date. Pure Scorpius and Albus fluff. Awkward conversations and a lot of strange situations’.

I love this so much. This author has seen the play and it shows. Her characterizations and dialogue are so spot on. So awkward, adorable and heartfelt!

*The Ball- torestoreamends

‘A ball is being held at Hogwarts to celebrate the end of fifth and seventh year exams. Scorpius has agreed to go with Rose, and Albus shouldn’t be as upset about that as he is. Dancing, fancy robes, obliviousness, and a small sprinkling of brotherly advice ensue.’

This is so gorgeous. Just her description of the robes slayed me. Read everything by torestoreamends!

*Seasons- starlightpeddlar

‘From the moment Scorpius and Albus get on the Hogwarts Express for their fifth year, things start to change. Albus starts to gain confidence both in the classroom and out of it, and Scorpius’ realization that he has greater feelings for his best friend threatens to leave him more alone than he’d ever imagined’.

Wonderful four chapter prequel to ‘Quietly’. Quietly is quite long and intense, but this is a nice getting together story, though it is still quite meaty and introduces important themes for the series.

*Put Your Guns Away Its Tea Time- frombluetored

‘Ginny Potter estimates it will only take three days into the Weasley-Potter family holiday for Albus to act on his feelings for his best friend. Albus estimates it will only take three days for him to die of embarrassment. And Scorpius, well. Scorpius is just glad to be there with Albus in the first place.’

I love this so much! The characters are so spot on and we get to see other Next Gen kids as well as all the grown up characters we love. Come for the Scorbus, stay for Ginny and the whole Weasley clan.

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Farewell, Pretty Little Liars.

Today is the day that we must finally say goodbye to Pretty Little Liars. With its never-ending theories and constant renewals, the PLL endgame always seemed like an intangible, abstract and theoretical concept that is just so far away, that it will simply never come. It feels so surreal to say that today is that day, which again, over the years, was never in sight. I thought watching Pretty Little Liars would just be some light, weekly, background entertainment. On June 8 2010, I did not truly know what crazy rollercoaster I had stumbled upon. Through numerous ups and downs, these past 7 years have certainly been unforgettable. If you told me seven years ago that a television show will have such a positive impact on my life, I would have laughed at you and called you dramatic. Tell me that today, and I’ll smile in appreciation at the positive influence and power a television show can bestow upon its viewers.

Not every show makes it to seven seasons, particularly mystery shows. Seven years is a long time. I started watching this show when I was 13, and I am now 19. (I realise I am probably very young in comparison to most other PLL fans!) Just to visually see this: Pretty Little Liars was with me while I was 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19. These are arguably some of the most important years of one’s life. As I grew, PLL grew too, in a literal sense, as we got a time jump where the characters matured, but also in figurative sense, since the stories gradually shifted from being high-school oriented to dark and twisted themed through a demented dollhouse and a psychologically straining board game. All while PLL was on the air, I graduated from primary school and high school, started university, got my driver’s license, my first job, credit card, car, gone overseas by myself, and made life-long friendships. Achieving all that never was easy, but it was made easier by PLL. If I ever struggled in my personal development, I always had PLL to fall back upon for psychological stability and security, aside from general entertainment. A part of me sees the end of PLL as if the training wheels are coming off my bike: for 7 years, I was learning how to become a young man, and now that I finally am one, I no longer need this safety rock that is PLL in order to continue developing.

This long, personal post is dedicated to me and my seven-year relationship with Pretty Little Liars.

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How to become a good student (again) 1: Slow down to speed up

Hello, fellow ex-good-student! 

If you’re anything like me, you feel this immense pressure on your shoulders, yes? You want to be good, you want to succed, you want to know more, but somehow -… somehow it just ain’t enough to actually get you to do something? Until the very last minute, that is, when all the pressure comes rushing down like a waterfall?

Ah, or perhaps that stress has driven you over the edge and you have achieved the next stage: being so stressed that you’re oddly calm again and nothing really fazes you anymore? Perhaps you have cynically accepted that this is just who you are now? Perhaps you say:

But somehow you fail to say it proudly. Somehow you’re just really unhappy with the state of things, but feel like you don’t give enough of a fuck to really change anything? 
Yes? Well, then this is the post for you!

Let me start with three observations that are less obvious than you might think: 

1) “Naturally” good students (NGS, so people, like you and me, who didn’t have to learn how to be good at school, but kinda slipped into it) are good thinkers. 

2) Good thinkers like to think.

3) Good thinkers are trouble-shooters. 

Got these three ideas lined up? Alright, let’s move on.

These two attitudes above, where do you think they come from? I’d argue it’s disillusionment. 

See, when I got to uni, I thought it would be like school - just WAY better. That would mean professors who fit their programmes around me, personally, who help my mind become sharper by letting it battle against just the right problems and getting taught how to really get to the bottom of life, to face the really Big Ideas, the Final Problems, the Why is the universe the way it is?s.
Instead, it turns out, uni is like summer holidays - just WAY worse. No one fits anything to you, personally, no one picks out just the right problems, no one connects subjects in just the way you’d like it. You’re thrown into a maelstrom of ideas and it’s up to you to do whatever the hell you’d like with them. You’re on your own, but not in the hero vs. bad guy-way, but it in the loner in a crowd-way. 

You quickly realize, uni is just a slightly filtered version of life in all its random glory and sadness. And I think that any student, anywhere, can have this epiphany at any given moment. You don’t need uni to suddenly look life in the eye and be overwhelmed by how sublime, how overwhelmingly huge it is and to realize: There’s no end goal (we know of). Just loads of open ends. An overwhelming amount of open ends, really. 

Now, what do I mean when I say that NGS (”naturally” good students) are trouble-shooters? I mean that we’re good at working well within systems. 
We like to be fed input, to take it apart, to analyze it and to see how you could perfect it even further. That’s why so many of us are drawn to video games or TV series or fictional worlds with their own reward system. We like to figure out patterns. That’s also why we were so good at school - school is a fairly easy system. 
Once you’ve seen through which lessons will be important for a test, once you notice how teachers stress certain things more than others, once you notice you really only need to pay attention in class and you’ll spare yourself so much trouble, once you notice that doing your homework actually does help, once you notice these few pillars of school, you’re set, man. 

I’d like to compare this to thinking on two different levels: a life-level (where you actually do stuff) and a meta-level (where you think about doing the stuff). My preferred analogy for this is a cube.

Ideally, you first figure out the shape of the cube (meta-level) and, once you’re comfortably settled into the system, you work within it (life-level). I’d say that most people operate this way, but NGS are …a little obsessed with this. The basic idea is that the system must first be perfect (or perfectly understood) before it is implemented, so it runs smoothly.  
This is what I mean when I say we’re trouble-shooters. We detect the trouble ahead of time and pew, pew, pew. And, as I said, this works with video games. And books. And school. And subjects. But life? Life looks a little more like this:

No one’s (yet) succeeded to fit life into this box. 
“But”, a little voice inside you says, “But I can try!” (and another, more smug voice, says “And who’s to say I’m not the one to succeed anyway?”)
And, well, I’ve got good news for you! You’ve already tried! That’s why you’re here. In limbo. 

You and I both, we’ve tried to figure out the perfect recipe for life. We tried to figure out when to best get up, when to best go to sleep, what the perfect conditions for studying are, what best to study in the first place, what artsy pursuits to keep doing to flex creativity, but to also focus on practical things and how to figure out the whole family and friends-thing and schedule it somewhere in between and maybe write a book or two. You’ve tried to create the box. I’ve tried to create the box. We both failed.
Let me show you a highly artistic representation of what your brain has looked like lately: 

Okay, fine, I’ll invest a bit more time:

There, that’s your mind. Pulling in every single direction. Is it really a surprise that you’re not going anywhere? Y’know this meme?

Yeah, that’s exactly what I’m talking about. Now, if you’re anything like me, you’ll have a whiny voice at the back of your head going “But picking fewer battles is defeat! I’m sure I’ll conquer it somehow!”
Well, then, let me mindslap you with the cold, hard truth: No. What you’re doing right now, that’s defeat. 

This?

This is DEFEAT. You’re not going anywhere and you’re disrespecting yourself, your mind and the subjects you’re interacting with by spending a fraction of a thought on them. You’re just using them as stepping stones. They deserve better. You deserve better. That’s why you fail to say it proudly. You know that, at some point, you looked at the big, huge mess that is life, realized “I won’t figure this out” and said “Well, I’ll stop trying, I guess.”

I’ll talk more about this in my “Yearn for friendship”-post, but for now, the main take-away is:

You won’t be done with figuring out life any time soon.

So, don’t think “I want to be done with this.”

Think “I want to be doing this.”

Step out of the meta-level into the life-level. It’s okay not to perfectly understand life right now. You’ll figure it out.Trust me, you’ll figure it out. But only by doing things.

Because, see, NGS may be trouble-shooters, but the trouble-shooting isn’t the fun part. It’s the first step to entering a magical world with which you can interact, be it maths, or Middle Earth, or a birthday party. 
We like to think. 
And you’ve been depriving yourself of the fun of thinking by thinking you have to do it in a perfect way. 

“But what if it’s not perfect?”
That’s okay. You’ll get better. And something imperfect that’s striving to be good is always better than nothing at all. Some things you figure out by doing. Life is one of those things. Imagine you’re in a dark street and you want to illuminate it. You can either miserably sit in darkness and try to figure out a way to turn on all lights at once, or you can start with one and let the sight of snowflakes or petals welling up underneath it give you strength for the next. Allow yourself little successes. Allow yourself to have fun with imperfect things. Make the first step. Let it give you strength for the next.”

“But what if I lose time?”

“Be patient. Life will literally last all your life. This is as much time as you’re ever gonna get. Allow yourself to take this time and to take it slow. Again: think not about getting it done, but about the joy of doing it. Time spent doing the thing you love is never lost time. Put the pressure of your shoulders. Trust me, if you take it slow, your brain will speed up because it has breathing room.
Let me repeat this:
If you take it slow
your brain will speed up.

So, allow your brain to think like this:

(or at least like this:

Be patient. I cannot stress this enough. Be. Patient.
Time is not your enemy that you have to outrace. Time is your partner, whom you have to trust. Time helps you to grow. Time helps you to understand. Time literally helps you to BE. 
For me, the phrase that really struck a chord with me somehow was
I will grow as my hair did”, because it a) shows how long it can take for tiny changes to become visible, and how b) they do become visible in the end.)

“But I don’t want to completely lose my grip on the meta-level! I don’t just want to blindly run into one direction!”

“I get you. So did I. So here’s what I did: I made a pact with myself. 
On the 25th of every month (because my birthday is on the 25th, but pick whichever day you like best), I ascend to the meta-level and critically assess my own situation. 
I exit the cube and check if I like what the cube looks like right now. 
No? Okay, time to introduce some big changes. 
Yes? Okay, carry on as before. 
I actually wrote down basic rules for what life in the cube looks like (when to do laundry, etc.), so I wouldn’t have to worry about it during the month and let me tell you, it works great. During the month, I just let my mind slice and dice away (I’ll talk more about the mind as a weapon in the next post) and once a month, I check if I like the results. For me, at least, it’s the perfect arrangement. 

So, be patient. And watch Hyouka - it’s about this very struggle and the MC slowly realizes that, sometimes, it’s worth to spend energy, mind-power and time on certain things. Some things… just take time. And that’s okay.

Grow as your hair does.

(Here’s the masterpost for all the posts in this series: x)

(Part 2)

anonymous asked:

Hey, I saw your tags on the ladywongs post, so I just wanted to know your opinion about the latest touka/mutsuki. honestly, I feel it unnecessarily complicated something so simple and it made me feel violated, cause I feel like I loved a character that was not touka. Do you perhaps...have an insight you wanna share?

Well, I was grateful for the shoutout that meta gave me and I’ve been a fan of a lot of metas that writer has produced, but this one in particular I very much disagreed with. I think the claim that Touka loves the idea of Kaneki while not really understanding the person ignores the fact that every time she’s made a serious observation about Kaneki she’s been bang on the money.

If she idolises Kaneki so, why has she made such a damning assessment about him? And it’s not just an assessment of the changed Shironeki that she resents, it extends to the Kuroneki she supposedly idolises as well. And what’s more, she’s completely right. This is even acknowledged by Kaneki himself.

Touka doesn’t idolise an image of Kaneki. Far from it. The chapter on the bridge is titled “Penetration” because Touka sees past the roles Kaneki plays to the scared kid inside. At this point, she probably has the best understanding of Kaneki than anyone in the series - maybe even more than Hide. For further proof, Touka knows at a FREAKING GLANCE just what Kaneki intends to do to himself when they meet up at Cochlea.

If this was just a casual “Seeya”, do you think it would be all Touka would say to him after all this time? She can tell Kaneki has no intention of making it out alive, so the first thing she does is to remind him that his death won’t affect him alone, and it very clearly shakes him up; setting him on the path to choose to live. Just like how their confrontation on the bridge convinced Kaneki to go back to Anteiku, if not quite in time.

Touka’s not being unreasonable because the Kaneki she idolised has changed. She’s mad because Kaneki’s going down a path of self-destruction, and it does destroy him. In the last quarter of the first manga the narrative breaks its back pointing out that Kaneki’s gone too far down the Shironeki path - it’s not just Touka, it’s also Yoshimura, Nishiki, even resident devil on Kaneki’s shoulder Shuu, not to mention events like Kaneki stabbing Banjou, seeing Rize crazed and helpless, and all the foreshadowing packed into ‘The Hanged Man’s McGuffin’. Touka is trying to help Kaneki because she genuinely does know what’s best for him because she genuinely understands him. I don’t think anyone would try to claim that convincing Kaneki to live at Cochlea was a bad thing either.

Now if Touka is ‘obsessed’ with Kaneki, if it can’t possibly be love because they only knew each other for two months, then it would stand to reason that Kaneki would be far, far more important to Touka than she would be for him.

Then why is it that in Kaneki’s mind, after only knowing Touka for two months and Hide for all his life, Touka is on equal footing with Hide? He includes the whole of Anteiku in the above panel, but Touka gets special mention with Hide in the next. 

And here, in his dying moments, Touka gets the biggest panel, placed on the next page for the biggest effect. Touka is just as important to Kaneki as vice-versa. 

But neither is ‘obsessed’ with the other.

Touka broke into Cochlea to save Hinami, not Kaneki. She didn’t even know he was there. She most definitely has a life outside Kaneki and her love for him is far from all-consuming. While he had lost his memories, she was fully willing to accept the possibility she might never talk to him again. She might love him, but if she was obsessed and didn’t have a life outside of him, there’s no way she could make a sacrifice like that even if her aim was selflessness. Yoshimura loved his daughter, and set up Anteiku anticipating her return, but he had a life outside of her too. It’s the same with Touka.

The original post tries to dismiss Touka’s feelings being a healthy form of love by comparing it to spending three years dedicating yourself to a co-worker who you knew for two months, but dumbing it down to their official relationship and a span of time removes an enormous amount of context to explain why she feels this way. In real life, you wouldn’t have fought side-by-side with your co-worker in life-threatening situations time and time again. These kind of high-pressure environments cause bonds and trust to become much much thicker much more quickly. “Summer friends will melt away like summer snows, but winter friends are friends forever”.

Sure Touka sees Arata in Kaneki. That’s not a bad thing at all. Arata was a great dude. Having an Arata in your life is a real positive thing, and there’s absolutely no reason why Touka shouldn’t chase it. People are hardwired to get with people who remind them of their parents - it’s in our genetic programming, it doesn’t diminish the love they feel for that person or make them love them less for who they are in the slightest. Trying to heal the wounds of old losses by emotionally investing yourself in new people is totally healthy - the unhealthy thing would be to shut yourself off from the world, just like Touka was doing at the start of the manga - a rut Kaneki helped her out of. It would be bad if she were just pretending that Kaneki was Arata, but she isn’t - she behaves totally differently around him and she has demonstrated many times an understanding of those personality traits Kaneki possesses that are completely different from Arata’s. It would be problematic if Kaneki got with someone who reminded him of his mother (read: Rize) because his mother was a horrible person; but Touka, even if she occasionally throws a hit at him (a product of her upbringing which is very rare nowadays - also Kaneki is nowhere near as vulnerable in this situation as he was a child, he’s the OEK for crying out loud), constantly gives Kaneki both the emotional attention and the hard truths that he needs.

This panel:

Is unambiguously a good thing. Touka’s development was never about growing into herself without the need for others, because she was already like that at the start of the manga. Touka’s development was about rediscovering the humanity she cast aside to protect herself from pain, and then balancing that with the strength she found with being a Ghoul. The first stage was greatly aided by Kaneki - whom she indeed admired, but never idolised - and the second stage she completed herself. 

Mutsuki’s love is a different beast entirely than Touka’s love. Mutsuki’s focus on Touka was precisely to emphasise Mutsuki’s jealousy, because Mutsuki recognises the bond Kaneki and Touka share. Mutsuki’s feelings are not meant to parallel Touka’s, but tie in with the other complicated entanglements of this arc, showcasing different kinds of love. I do strongly believe we’ll get both Touken and Akiramon resolutions soon, and positive ones too; the negativity around love this arc has displayed to us so far is set up to make those two relationships shine brighter.

So don’t worry anon, just because a meta says Touka is different from how you think about her doesn’t mean it’s right - it’s all a matter of interpretation. No one person’s opinion is automatically more important than another (except in this case maybe Sui Ishida - and maybe not even then, if you adhere to Death Of The Author literary theory), your analysis is just as valid as anyone else’s if you can argue it with evidence.

But even so, I am very much of the opinion in this fandom that if you see any meta that tries to claim that none of the main characters have developed at all since the start of the manga, take it with approximately this much salt:

Writing Series #2: Plotting

Everyone has their own strategy for this one, but it’s also probably the aspect of writing that we ask each other about most of the time: what do you do to figure out your plot? How do you stick to a plot? How do you know where a story is going? How do you stay interested long enough to finish? How do you keep from getting lost? For first time writers, this is particularly daunting, as we tend to think of a book–all 80,000 words or so–as overwhelming and more than we know how to accomplish, as something too big or unattainable. 

Some writers sit down with a single idea and go from there, letting the story come as it may and waiting for the ideas to strike as they write. For many writers, this works. For me, it doesn’t. 

My process looks a lot more like this:

  1. Wait for an idea to strike (and I mean strike; it has to come to me, haunt me, bug me, until I’m sure I can do nothing but write it)
  2. Plot. Plan out everything. Write it all down, outlining each chapter–what will happen in each and how many there will be.
  3. Write. 
  4. Edit. 
  5. Edit again. 

Step One: There are lots of good ideas out there, and my notebooks are filled with ideas; ideas that occurred to me in the middle of the night, ideas I thought up after witnessing something in a park or listening to a good song. New ideas are exciting and can lead to great things, but I won’t turn any of them into a book until I’m sure the idea won’t go away. 

I don’t write it down. That’s the first test; if I haven’t forgotten it the next day, or the next, or the next, then I know it might actually lead somewhere, that it’s not a fleeting idea that will tempt me and then leave me hanging. I let this go on for a month–yes, a whole month–and if at the end of that month, I still can’t let that idea go, if it’s still rolling around in my head, waiting to be explored, then I move onto step two. By then, I know that the idea and me are long-term, that we’re in this for the long run. 

Step Two: I plot. I plot everything. 

  • I start with the main arc: where do I want the story to start, and where do I want it to finish. In my most recent story, for example, I knew that I wanted the main character to begin cynical of love and relationships, and I wanted the story to end with him opening his heart to the possibility (even if he wasn’t yet in a relationship–that bit I’d find out later). I knew I wanted the three strangers at the beginning of the story to be best friends by the end. I knew they’d all start with some trauma, and I wanted them all to successfully be on the path to recovery and healing by the end. 
  • Then I looked to time: I believe it’s important to know just how much ground, chronologically speaking, a book is going to cover. I needed to know how long my characters would have to experience the emotional growth mentioned above (the less time, the more the plot would have to directly affect them, the more intense that plot would need to be). I gave them the summer. Just three months to learn and get to know each other, which meant every day was going to count, and I wasn’t going to be writing a lot of moments skipping ahead in time. (If the story was to last five years, for example, I’d have a lot more room to build these relationships, and so things could unfold more subtly and with large chunks of time between.)
  • Then I look to characters: I write down all the main and minor characters (naming them is a good first step, though this can change later) and I write down both their emotional state when the story starts and what they’re actively doing with their lives, and their emotional state when the story ends and where they’re at/going with their lives then. 

As you’ll see, there’s a pattern here: I figure out point A and point B. Then I make a list of little things I want to happen, different scenes that have begun to play out in my head, interactions I want the characters to have, pitstops no the way from A to B. And slowly, I build the story around them. I begin to figure out how we get there, which road the story is going to take, and little by little, the story comes together until I have an outline that looks a bit like this:

Chapter One: Opens in [setting]. Character A talks to Character B about [topic] They meet Character C. Ends with Character A realizing [topic]. 

And so on, until we get to the last chapter. In a way, this outline becomes a script, my go-to plan. 

Do I always stick to the script? No. But when I begin to write, I keep that list pulled up beside my new blank word document, and I read it from time to time. Sometimes, once I get writing, once I begin to know the characters a bit more, and once the story finds a voice of its own, I go off script, and the story takes me places I wouldn’t have expected. But I always make sure I refer back, make sure that one way or another, I come back to to road map. It’s okay to take a pitstop on the path, to go off on a tangent, but the plot map allows me to find my way back to what’s relevant, to what I know has to happen to get from A to B. 

For any writers out there who worry about making their stories big enough, who have trouble thinking of side plots, this is also a good way to map that out and see where your story has room to grow and what it can encapsulate. It lets you see just how big the story will become and if it belongs in novel format or if, perhaps, the idea is better suited for a short story. 

To all the writers out there: how do you plot? Are you a planner or a wing-it sort of writer, or is there some way to write in between? Feel free to comment her or message with your go-to tips!

Used to This - Part V

Overview: You’ve lived with the Winchesters for years as a fellow hunter, and everyone has always stayed well in the friend zone. What happens when nightmares come haunting and Dean offers to help? Will things change, or is it all in your head?

Characters: Dean, Reader

Word Count: 2,434

Warnings: mild language, Dean snuggles, fluff, sassy arguments, weighted decisions, an ending where some of you might scream at me for more and I’ll just smile and wave for the time being

A/N: This is the last “official” part. I keep putting ‘official’ in quotes because I’ve left this to where I could pick it up again easily with a new chapter or some baby drabbles if my mind so leads me. But for now, my soul is happy with this resolution. Thanks for all the love you guys have shown me for this :) I hope you love how it turns out.

Beta’d by: @wheresthekillswitch - “Leave Sammy’s hair alone!”

Also beta’d by: @hannahindie - “I just snorted so hard I scared the cat.”

Read: (Part 1) (Part 2) (Part 3) (Part 4)

I found myself incapable of responding. Of moving. Of thinking.

All I could do was feel.

Goosebumps along my spine with every exhale against the back of my neck.

Fire pulsing when Dean tightened his arm around me.

Electricity shooting up my legs when his feet curled around mine.

Heat pooling through every inch of my being like water slowly warming up in the shower. Water that quickly got hot. Very hot.

Dean’s nose brushed my ear as he pulled me closer to him, and my heart rate spiked even more.

This is it. This is how it ends. Internal combustion.

My stiff muscles twitched of their own accord.

“Y/N?”

Oh shit.

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All reasons Jon3rys will not be endgame ( Jonsa will)

@mssassypants76​​

Thanks for the ask! Sorry it took me so long to give you an answer! I know its been at least a week, but I did not forget you! Honestly, when I started writing this I did not expect it to end up as long as it did… I guess I just got a little too passionate about the endgame possibilities for GOT/ASOIAF.

So to actually answer your question : long story short, regardless of any romance I think Jon will betray Daenerys- Jon will be Dany’s last treason. And her death (result of the betrayal) will be fundamental in ending the long night- this is why Jon will betray her, to save everyone, including those he loves (especially Sansa) form the WW. Thus Jon will be free to end up with his love Sansa - and he will!

That was the short answer! Here is the longer answer as to why I am 100% sure why Jon/Daenerys will not be endgame, and that he will betray her during the long night. And to make it easier to follow I have divided it up into sections:

1. The Jon/Dany romance did not make any sense in the show
      a) Why Jon and Dany did not have the proper build up/execution for Jonerys to be a believable romance
      b) Comparing Jon/Dany romance to all other important romantic pairings we’ve seen develop on the show
      c) How it makes no narrative sense for Jon to “choose love over duty” and give the North to Daenerys
2.  Dany and Jon living happily ever after sitting on the Iron throne in the end makes NO NARRATIVE sense
      a) Jon/Dany “falling in love” and sitting on the iron throne together is too predictable
      b) The show (and books) have set Dany up to slowly become an antagonist by the end of the series and have slowly set up Sansa to become a queen, and Jon a king.
       c) The show (and books) have have slowly set up Sansa to become a queen, and Jon a king.
  3. And finally: JON AND DANY ARE NOT THE SONG OF ICE AND FIRE. JON is Ice AND Fire; Dany is PURE FIRE and the WW are PURE ICE


Okay! So! Let’s  Let’s start off with why the Jon/Dany romance did not make any sense:

Okay, so the first thing I am going to say, is that before being a Jonsa shipper, I am a die hard fan of Game of Thrones and the novels of ASOIAF because I believe it to be one of the most incredible, complex and intriguing series out there. And before ANYTHING else, I want the series to have an amazing well executed ending that will do the series justice, regardless if the ship I love becomes cannon or not. My true OTP is GOT/ASOIAF X Strong-Plot-Points-And-An-Ending-That-Makes-Sense.
That being said, I’m 100% sure Dany has fallen for Jon, but I’m not convinced Jon is 100% in love with Daenerys. It’s really confusing for me tbh… the only scene that Jon showed any kind of affection towards Dany IMO was in their last scene in 7x06…in the rest of their scenes they didn’t really seem to have a true connection and their chemistry was lukewarm. I’m not just saying this because I ship Jonsa, I’m open to the idea of Jonerys and I think I wouldn’t even mind seeing a romance there, just as long as it was properly executed and made sense.  Which I really don’t think it was at all! And I will explain why I don’t think the Jon/Dany romance made sense…But regardless of if Jon is in love with Dany or not, I believe the ending will be roughly the same and I will explain my thoughts on that as well in as much detail as I can without being too long lol.

a)- Why Jon and Dany did not have the proper build up/execution for Jonerys to be a believable romance

Okay, so the whole Jon3rys romance has truly failed to convince me for a number of reasons. I’m not the only one who didn’t feel the magic in their romance…  a lot of people and critics have picked up on this too. I don’t think timing or the pace of the season had anything to do with it. D&D are perfectly capable of writing a believable romance with limited amount of screen time. Just look at Robb and Tailsa, they met, fell in love and had sex in under 18 minutes of screen time and it all felt natural and convincing!

^^^ No one doubted this for a second,

The thing is, we never got to see a true bond form between Jon and Dany or honestly see any reason/justification as to why Jon would fall in love with Dany… like okay she saved his life, but that’s not a good enough reason to explain Jon suddenly falling head over heels in love with her and giving her the North!

Like in the previous episodes:
1. Dany kept refusing to help him fight the WW and save thousands of lives because of her obsession with ruling all seven kingdoms was more important to her;
2. She used her dragons to burn people alive -despite Jon stating that he is morally against this (and one of them was his best friend’s beloved brother);
3. And Jon didn’t even care to look back at her when he left dragon stone, while Jorah -the man who truly loves her-did

^^^This is what it looked like Jon was thinking

And most importantly: while Dany did open up to Jon (about her family, the dragons being her only children, etc) Jon did not open up to her about personal matters AT ALL. They do not have a basis for a true emotional connection. This is perfectly reflected in their sex scene - we never got to see them undress each other which symbolizes taking each other’s walls down and becoming physically and emotionally naked. We never even got to see their first kiss! Like their sex scene lated 20 seconds, with absolutely no buildup or first kiss but had Dany looking at Jon with heart eyes and Jon looking back at her all weird and while creepily breathing AND IT HAD A VOICEOVER THAT CREEPILY AND MONOTONELY EXPLAINED HOW THEY ARE AUNT AND NEPHEW…. This is how NOT to write a convincing romance 101. Why would the show do this to the most anticipated and arguably the most important pairing in the series?!?!! I REFUSE to believe D&D would fuck up this bad. This has to be intentional-that makes the most sense.

b)- Comparing Jon/Dany romance to all other important romantic pairings we’ve seen develop on the show

Let’s compare Jon3rys to all other loving couples on the show, shall we? In each end every one of them we got to see them open up to each other about personal matters - forming a true emotional connection- and we got to see them have their first/passionate kiss before making love. Think of all the important romances we got to see develop in GOT and how their sex scenes went down:

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Epic Movie (Re)Watch #124 - Zootopia

Spoilers below.

Have I seen it before: Yes

Did I like it then: Yes!

Do I remember it: Yes.

Did I see it in theaters: Yes.

Was it a movie I saw since August 22nd, 2009: Yes. #412.

Format: Blu-ray

1) From the very start this film is excellent storytelling. The opening scene where young Judy and her classmates clearly establishes the conflict of predator vs. prey and the biases that come from that, the film’s humor and heart, and Judy as a character.

2) My mother is an actuary. My brother is studying to be an actuary. Actuaries don’t do this.

Little Jaguar: “Today I can hunt for tax exemptions. I’m going to be an actuary!”

3) Judy’s parents (Don Lake & Bonnie Hunt) are so funny in such a sad way.

Stu: “Judy, you ever wonder how your mom and me got to be so darn happy?”

Judy: “Nope.”

Stu: “Well, we gave up on our dreams and we settled. Right, Bon?”

Bonnie: “Oh yes, that’s right Stu. We settled hard.”

4) Gideon Grey.

Originally posted by masha-russia

Gideon is a perfect example of how nothing - NOTHING - in this film is superfluous, but I’m actually going to speak on that further into the film.

5) The police academy scene gives wonderful exposition. It sets up the environment and rules of Zootopia’s various ecosystems in a way that feeds into Judy’s conflict and character.

6) Ginnifer Goodwin as Judy Hopps.

Originally posted by floppy999

Goodwin (a massive Disney fan herself) breathes perfect life into Hopps. The best voice over work is when you’re not distracted by the voice actor. When their voice and their heart match with the character so perfectly that you don’t hear - say - Kristen Bell as Anna or Mike Myers as Shrek, you only hear the character’s. Goodwin is able to balance Judy’s massive optimism and heart along with the scenes where Judy has lost those things perfectly. I don’t think anyone else could have voiced Hopps as well as Goodwin.

7) If you want to avoid a slew of bad animal puns, don’t look too hard at Judy’s iPod.

8) “Try Everything” by Shakira.

Originally posted by raddestboy

Written by Sia, Tor Erik Hermansen, and Mikkel Storleer Eriksen, the theme song which deserved an Oscar nomination captures Judy’s optimism and struggles perfectly. The song’s lyrics speak of optimism in the face of constant failure, a theme which is very relevant to Judy in the first half of the film. It also provides the perfect backdrop to the visual introduction of Zootopia as Judy enters the city on train.

9) Subtle.

Judy [after Clawhauser calls her “cute”]: “Ooh, ah, you probably didn’t know, but a bunny can call another bunny ‘cute’, but when other animals do it, that’s a little…”

Originally posted by wish-for-the-moon

10) This film really runs with the animal puns.

(GIF originally posted by @baawri)

Bogo [turning to an Elephant officer]: “Francine. Happy birthday!”

11) I love the way the filmmakers handled Judy’s office discrimination. She is treated just as a token bunny, someone who’s only there for PR. Except she was top of her class at Zootopia police academy: a difficult feat for anybody, let alone a bunny. But this just feeds into the biases Bogo already has about Judy: she’s not really that good, they just said she was because she’s a bunny. That plays into real life way more than it probably should.

12) Wow, I did not catch how entirely speciesist this line was until now:

Ice Cream Parlor Owner [to Nick]: “Look, you probably can’t read…”

Damn that’s speciesist.

13) Jason Bateman as Nick Wilde.

Originally posted by a-zootopia-fan

Remember how I said great voice over work is noted by not realizing you’re listening to a voice over artist? The same can be said of Bateman’s performance of Wilde, 100%. To start, Bateman captures Wilde’s surface level of sly con artists WONDERFULLY well. He’s devilish and charming in the same vein as Danny Ocean or Han Solo, and Bateman expresses this perfectly. But as the film progresses Bateman is also able to show off Nick’s layers. His troubled past, his occasional lack of self-worth and anger at the world. And the honest level never changes. It’s not like Bateman was hired ONLY for the slyness of Nick’s role and had to power through the rest, he’s able to do it all. It’s a great voice over for a great character.

14) The relationship between Nick & Judy is the cornerstone of this film. What I personally like about it is its honesty. There’s no BIG moment when these two meet, it’s a chance encounter which grows to conflict and then budding friendship so organically you don’t even know it’s happening.

Originally posted by surreal-teal

15) There is nothing even remotely superfluous in this film. Nick makes a comment about how he’s been running his popsicle con his whole life and that will come back to bite him in the butt later.

16) This pig is played by Josh Dallas, Ginnifer Goodwin’s onscreen partner in “Once Upon a Time” and real life husband.

17) The chase through Zootopia is an incredible amount of fun, especially when Judy and Duke get to Little Rodentia. The filmmakers are able to play with their concept in a visual entertaining and imaginative way, which in turn keeps us as the audience wrapped up in the world they’ve established.

Note: I’m going to take about Alan Tudyk as Duke later in the film, at a very specific moment.

18) Again, there is nothing superfluous in this film (a note I’m going to be making a lot):

Judy [after saving Mr. Big’s daughter]: “Love your hair.”

Mr. Big’s Daughter: “Aww, thank you!”

It is this little encounter (and, you know, the fact that Judy saved her life) that saves Judy & Nick from getting “iced” by Mr. Big later in the film.

19) Again, nothing superfluous in the film. As the “non-onions” that Duke stole end up being very important later on.

20) Disney is at its bets when it pokes fun at itself.

Bogo: “Life isn’t some cartoon musical where you sing a little musical and your insipid dreams MAGICALLY COME TRUE! So let it go.”

Originally posted by rinshi-chan

21) Can we all just take a moment to appreciate Nick’s face after Judy says she’ll arrest him for, “felony tax evasion,” after he brags to her about how he’s been running this con since he was a kid and how much money he makes?

(GIF originally posted by @animations-daily)

22) Again, with the idea that nothing in this film is superfluous: Judy’s recording pen becomes very important as the movie goes on.

23) Only Tommy Chong could play this character.

(GIF source unknown [if this is your GIF please let me know].)

Like there’s a chance he’s not even reading from a script, they just had Tommy Chong come in and told him what the movie was about and he just started talking.

24) This is the funniest part of the whole film, in my opinion.

Originally posted by officialmoviegoer

The entire DMV scene plays well not only with the concept established by the film of an animal society in a way which is funny on its own, but the continuing conflict of Judy’s eagerness, Flash’s slowness, and Nick’s desire to throw a monkey wrench into the whole thing leads to amazing comedy.

25) Did you know Kristen Bell is in this film?

Originally posted by musicallyfoxypokemon

Bell landed the role not only because of her working with Disney on Frozen, but also because she is a noteworthy sloth enthusiast (as seen on “Ellen”).

26) It is nice to see Nick freak out when he realizes he and Judy are in Mr. Big’s limo, as it shows us a part of him we haven’t gotten to look at much in the film so far.

27) Maurice LaMarche as Mr. Big.

(GIF originally posted by @rocktheholygrail)

LaMarche is a noted voice over actor known primarily for his roles as Brain on “Pinky & The Brain”, various characters including Calculon on “Futurama”, and Mr. Freeze in the Batman Arkham series of video games. Here, we get to hear the veteran voice over artist do his best high pitched Brando impression.

28) This film has its fair share of nice surprises, details and twists which keeps you on your toes. The earliest of these is the revelation that the missing mammal Judy & Nick are looking for - Mr. Otterton - was in fact the one who attacked the limo driver (and not that he was the one attacked, as originally perceived).

29) This scene gives me life.

Bogo [after Judy’s witness disappears]: Two days to find the otter, or you quit. That was the deal. [Holding out hand] Badge.

Judy: But sir, we…

Bogo: Badge!

[Judy starts to turn in her badge]

Nick: Uh… no.

Chief Bogo: What did you say, fox?

Nick Wilde: Sorry, what I said was… NO! She will not be giving you that badge.[Bogo flinches] Look, you gave her a… a… a clown vest and a three wheel joke mobile and two days to solve a case you guys haven’t cracked in two weeks? Yeah, no wonder she needed to get help from a fox. None of you guys were gonna help her, were you? [Bogo starts to speak but Nick cuts him off] Here’s the thing, chief. You gave her the 48 hours, so technically we still have… 10 left, to find our Mr. Otterton. And that’s exactly what we’re gonna do. So, if you’ll excuse us, we have a very big lead to follow and a case to crack. Good day.

30) And then there’s this…

I saw this film twice in theaters and both times I was tearing up during Nick’s backstory. Anyone who has ever been bullied as a kid for being different will relate at least a little bit to what Nick went through. And it is this scene when Nick is at his most honesty with Judy, when they become pretty good friends and form a trust with each other.

31) NOTHING IN THIS FILM IS SUPERFLUOUS!!!! NOT EVEN A BLINK OR YOU’LL MISS IT STICKY NOTE ON BELLWETHER’S DESK!!!!

32) I did not think a Disney movie would make me jump like this (stop at 2:11).

33) This is incredibly rare for me, as someone who sees more than 60 films in theaters a year, but after Nick & Judy found the missing mammals and had the mayor arrested I had absolutely NO idea where the film was going after that. At all. I love it!

34) Nick’s face when Judy links the savage animals to being a predator…

(GIF source unknown [if this is your GIF please let me know].)

35) I had a film student criticize this film not based on the merits of its story or character’s or anything, but because they didn’t understand the metaphor. He noted that it’s not a clean comparison between white people and minorities and that’s exactly the point. This film is not about the people in power vs the people who aren’t, because who’s in power? The mayor may be a lion but the most biased character in the film - Chief Bogo - is prey. Bias goes all around and it can infect anybody, no matter what you think. Even Judy, for all her merits, is biased. She carries around fox repellent all the time and even has this line:

Judy: “It’s not like a bunny can go savage.”

That’s what I love about this film. It’s universal. It’s not about one real life society, it is about all societies everywhere and how bias can infect them and taint them and it’s up to us to work against that.

36) Fun fact: I had no idea otters were predators before seeing this film.

37) Gideon Grey returns.

Originally posted by klaus-baudelarie

If only all childhood bullies were like that, but again it gets to my oft-repeated point that nothing in this film is superfluous. Gideon could have easily been the one note bully from Judy’s youth who gave her the motivation to prove him wrong, but he comes back 15 years later in the most perfect way. She sees that people can change and that people who are good now are not always good (Gideon when he was younger, Judy when she was biased). It is a really important moment for her that was established all the way in the first ten minutes of this movie. I love that.

38) Judy’s apology to Nick and the way he handles it is something I truly love about this movie and their friendship as a whole.

And then I really love the little joke at the end about Judy trying to get to the pen and can’t help but wonder: was that written in the script? Was it Jason Bateman’s improv that made it into the film? It’s just so natural I must know!

39) Okay, I think this is the last time I will give this note, BUT NOTHING IN THIS MOVIE IS SUPERFLUOUS!!! This is most apparent to me when Nick does a little thing like expressing how much he likes the berries on Judy’s farm and it becomes so important to the plot latter when they switched out those berries with the Night Howlers in Bellwether’s dart gun.

40) THE BOOTLEG MOVIES!!!!

(GIFs originally posted by @bridgetjones)

41) And it’s followed up by this!

Both characters are voiced by Alan Tudyk. Because Disney just can’t let that one slide, can they? I love it.

42) Same Duke. Same.

(GIFs originally posted by @baawri)

43) The sticky note on Bellwether’s phone earlier was for Doug, the guy who mixes the night howler drug that makes animals go savage (this is the same drug who’s key ingredient was mixed from the non-onions Duke stole earlier in the film, FOR Doug).

44) At one point Doug - who is dressed in a yellow radiation suit and makes drugs for a living - lets his client know that “Woolter and Jesse” have arrived.

Originally posted by knurd-dna-denots

And yes, they did that on purpose.

45) The entire subway chase sequence is really great, because it is based heavily on the idea of action = consequence. A ram is running at the door, he gets through and hits another ram. The train goes too fast into a turn, it tips over and Judy/Nick are up a creek. It all works very nicely

46) Honestly, I didn’t figure out Bellwether was the bad guy until just before it was revealed the first time I saw this.

Originally posted by lostchel

47) Bellwether’s line about, “Fear ALWAYS works!” to keep the people in check should not be as relevant in 2017 as it is.

48) Okay, one thing I need to know: Bellwether is in jail, Mayor Lionheart is in jail, and Chief Bogo is still the police chief…SO WHO’S MAYOR NOW!?!?!?

Originally posted by justalittletumblweed

49) I know this film was pretty much a buddy cop movie, but I would be totally fine with a buddy cop movie where Nick is actually a cop.

Originally posted by blueberrycarrots

Lethal Weapon where Nick is Mel Gibson and Judy is…Danny Glover? Okay, that comparison doesn’t really work, but you get me!

50) And of course…

Originally posted by livelovecaliforniadreams


I honestly think Zootopia may be a perfectly written film, and that is not something I say lightly. I made it clear above how I find nothing in the film superfluous, which is an incredible feat I think. And they did it in a way that was never boring, with entertaining characters, an intriguing mystery, and a fun world. Zootopia may be my favorite Disney animated feature film, and it’s definitely my favorite of the “Modern Era” we’re in now (The Princess and the Frog - Present). Just a great, great, great film which deserved its Best Animated Picture win at the Oscars. A true treat all around.

Left Behind

Originally posted by multi-fandom-imagines13


Summary: Request-  May I request? It’s quite angsty and the scenario is where the reader, Winter Soldier and Captain America are in a life threatening situation, in which only two of them can make it out alive so the reader devises a plan - Prompt line: “You have to trust me on this one” that requires her to stay behind and get killed. The other two don’t realize what the reader has done till it’s too late.

Warnings/Themes: Angst, Panic, Implication of character death, cussing

Author’s Note: I’m not lying when I say that I wrote this at 2am in the morning. This has not been checked for errors, so woops. Enjoy some angst and bad fluency!

Word Count: 2,270 words

Y/N = Your Name

”Making my way to the front of the compromised helicarrier. (Y/N), Buck, do you guys copy?”

“Got it Cap. How many are you seeing, Bucky?”

“Three by the looks of it.”

You were looking for a bomb, the reason unknown to you. The problem was- it was designed so compactly that it would’ve been the size of a fucking lipstick tube and no one would know.

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