but this film was not what i expected

You Guys Fight But Try To Hide It From Your Friends (pt. II preview)

because i’m a shit person and was lazy, and you guys are angels and patient, so this is a preview :)))


pt. i

“Go shoot that fucking film, Darcy and I can survive without you.”

After those words leave your mouth, it’s as if Harry transforms in front of you. Gone is the gentle, kind man you love as his features twist and harden into something cruel and malicious.
“Fine.” Is the last word that you expect him to say, but he does anyway. And he continues to do what you least expect, because he’s gathering up his coat and twisting open the front door. He takes one last long look at you, and for a short moment (although it seems to last forever), everything is silent.

A scene plays in your mind–a scene that you can easily recreate. You rush across the room and embrace Harry, begging him not to go, taking back your initial thoughts and words and offering to live in France with him and Darcy. Him smiling down at you and telling you he would love that. You can almost see it….how simple it would be to achieve that.

And you see how easy it would be for another scenario to occur. The one where Harry is the one slamming the door back shut and shrugging off his coat, getting down on his knees in front of you like it’s the very first time and taking all his words back.

But neither of those things happen, because you both are stubborn people. The whole room is still, and when you almost think Harry’s going to leave for certain, a voice cuts through his chest. “Woah, easy there girl. Don’t want your mommy and daddy getting mad at me for destroying their washroom.” It’s Louis, and it’s…Darcy. Laughing. Upstairs. Oblivious to what’s happening down here. Tears start to gather up in your eyes.
Harry’s head drops to the ground, and when you’re just about to open your mouth and tell him to stay, he’s already out the door. Liam looks at you with an apologetic stare, but you can’t move. Not until you hear Harry’s car start, and the gates closing signalling he has already driven away. And when that all happens, you collapse onto the ground, in a sea of tears and hair and bones.
Darcy is still laughing.

How much you would give to have Harry upstairs with her…

So I kind of really want to address Chloe. I’ve seen some stuff about how they had expected Chloe to be a teacher or an exotic dancer and how her being a vet felt out of character. Now I may be wrong on this and I seriously encourage all of you to share your opinions on this topic, but in a sense I feel like it’s not out of character.

It showed a lot in the second film how unsure she was about what she wanted to do with her life. It’s totally possible she’s been going from job to job trying to figure it out. In the trailer I got the feeling that she was still really unsure and not exactly happy about where she was at. For example when she broke down about being willing to do anything to sing with the Bellas again. Of course they’re her friends and she loves singing with them, but being a Bella was the only thing she was actually sure of.

Maybe I’m reading too much into this, but if anyone has thoughts about this please do share them.

Things I think about at 2:35am apparently -

The original High School Musical is the most consistent in terms of plot, characters, and story structure.

High School Musical 2 is the most fun to watch with the best overall soundtrack (even if its existence adds nothing to the overall trilogy).

High School Musical 3 is the most polished with the best production design and the best choreography of the trilogy thanks to a better budget.

All 3 films have their strengths and weaknesses, and honestly??? What an iconic trilogy???? Also, all 3 films pass the Bechdel test and have a diverse cast. Lord of the Rings who?????

One Thing (Among Many) That I Really Appreciated About Wonder Woman

I was ready to go into Wonder Woman, fully expecting Steve Trevor’s story Arc to be “I’m sexist, and by the end of the film Diana will prove me wrong, but until then I’ll be a smarmy jerk boy.”  I was waiting for a “Woman can’t do X” joke or Steve being incredulous at her abilities and having it be played for laughs.  I was waiting for it, to clench my teeth and get through it.

BUT WHO BOY HOWDY WAS I WRONG AND I AM SO GLAD

becuase from the moment Steve “Ride or Die” Trevor washes up on Amazon Island of Buff Chicks he is 100% there for Diana.  He treats her as an equal, is supportive of her power, follows her into battle, and is only critical of her when he’s concerned for her safety, and even then does what he can to help her push forward anyway.  I wasn’t expecting to leave the theater having a lot of feelings about Steve Trevor but HOOOOO DOGGY. 

Like Steve is such a breath of fresh air.  After sitting through film after film of of stubborn, borish, snarky, sarcastic men that we’re supposed to revere as heroes, I’m so so thankful that we get Steve Trevor, who is a warrior who believes in the best of people, who willingly embraces vulnerability and the Lasso of Truth, who believes in self-sacrifice and that human beings are inherently good, who above all believes in, supports, relies on, follows, and loves Wonder Woman. 

ITS LIKE A WOMAN DIRECTED THIS MOVIE OR SOMETHING, FINALLY DEPICTING A HEROIC MAN OF WOMAN’S DESIRES, AS OPPOSED TO A HEROIC MAN OF WHAT MEN THINK IS WOMEN’S DESIRES

  • what i expected going into see Logan: a bloody gory action packed Wolverine film with zero chill and maximum violence
  • what i got: a father/ son father/daughter roadtrip flick through children of men stylescape of dystopian heartbreak that deals with issues of human trafficking and the exploitation of women of color's bodies and genetic engineering ethics that made me cry multiple times

Bee Movie is on netflix so I watched the whole thing

  • Bees in the movie live in a western-human-style society, complete with two-parent households and college etc, but they still make constant jokes about what bee societies are like in real life
  • References are made at the beginning of the film to the fact that bees have very short life spans and the main bee characters in the movie are expecting to live for another week at most, but then the movie itself takes place over several weeks or possibly months and they don’t seem to age or die
  • yes. yes, the bee presumably fucks the human woman
  • she’s, like, into him, sexually
  • I know that the weirdness of that is like a central part of why this movie has become a meme but listen: you can’t understand how truly off-putting that whole plot point is until you’ve actually watched it play out in front of your own eyes
  • the woman is married, too, so like, she has an emotional affair with a bee that drives her husband away in a scene where she tells him that “he’s the nicest bee I’ve met in a long time,” implying that she’s, like, known other bees on a personal level, to which he responds, “what are you talking about?” and you think he’s going to point out the obvious absurdity of her statement but instead he continues with, “are there OTHER bugs in your life?!”
  • all the bees are heavily coded as Jewish, and there’s a scene where Jerry Seinfeld’s bee parents are like, “do you have a girlfriend? I hope she’s bee-ish! She’s not a wasp, is she?” because… you know… wasp… WASP… get it
  • there is a Bee Larry King, who is played by Larry King and is, like, literally Larry King but a bee
  • did I mention that in the bee’s society, all the bees choose/are assigned honey-production jobs that they will work every day until they die, except like, there is evidence that other jobs exist - there is bee television, for instance, which would presumably require like, bee camera crews and bee producers and bee actors etc etc, so like, which bees are working those jobs? how does that work??
  • apparently in the world of this movie all you have to do to sue the entire human race is mail a letter
  • the whole court case comes down to the fact that no human being who isn’t a bee keeper has ever heard of a bee smoker and they all find it barbaric and horrifying
  • bee smokers in this world contain, like… nicotine and tar? like all the ingredients of actual commercial cigarettes? 
  • beekeepers in this world all hate bees, there is a scene where two beekeepers are making conversation with each other and their whole conversation is just about how much they hate bees, interspersed with manic cackling
  • instead of deliberating and coming back with a verdict the jury concludes the court case by just chanting “FREE THE BEES!” until the judge yells, “I FIND IN FAVOR OF THE BEES!!!!” 
  • AND THAT ISN’T EVEN THE END OF THE MOVIE there’s still like 20 minutes of plot I just
  • I can’t go on, I’m sorry
  • I may never be the same
A white guy’s thoughts on “Get Out” and racism

This weekend, I went to see a horror movie. It got stuck in my head, and now I can’t stop thinking about it—but not for any of the reasons you might think.

The movie was Jordan Peele’s new hit Get Out, which has gotten rave reviews from critics—an incredible 99% on Rotten Tomatoes—and has a lot of people talking about its themes.

First of all, I should tell you that I hate horror movies. As a general rule, I stay far, far away from them, but after everything I’d read, I felt like this was an important film for me to see. This trailer might give you some inkling as to why:

Creepy, huh? You might know writer/director Jordan Peele as part of the comedy duo Key & Peele, known for smartly tackling societal issues through sketch comedy. Get Out is a horror movie, but it’s also a film about race in America, and it’s impressively multilayered.

I left the theater feeling deeply disturbed but glad this movie was made. I can’t say any more without revealing spoilers, so if you haven’t seen the movie yet and you don’t want to have the plot spoiled for you, stop reading now and come back later.

Seriously, this is your last chance before I give away what happens.

Okay, you were warned. Here we go.

Our protagonist is Chris Washington, a young black man who has been dating Rose Armitage, a young white woman, for the last four months. She wants him to meet her family, but he’s hesitant. She acknowledges that her dad can be a little awkward on the subject of race, but assures Chris that he means well.

After unnerving encounters with a deer (echoes of The Invitation) and a racist cop, Chris and Rose arrive at the Armitages’ estate. On the surface, the Armitages are very friendly, but the conversation (brilliantly scripted by Peele) includes a lot of the little, everyday, get-under-your-skin moments of racism that people of color have to contend with: Rose’s dad going on about how he voted for Obama, for instance, and asking how long “this thang” has been going on. Chris laughs it off to be polite, though he clearly feels uncomfortable.

There’s a fantastic moment here, by the way, when Rose’s dad offhandedly mentions that they had to close off the basement because of “black mold.” In the midst of the racially charged atmosphere of the conversation, it’s nearly impossible not to take this as a racial remark, and Chris certainly notices, but what could he possibly say about it? Black mold is a real thing; his girlfriend would surely think he was crazy and oversensitive if he said it sounded racist. Chris never reacts to the remark, but that one tiny moment is a reminder to the audience of a real problem people of color often face, when racism can’t be called out without being accused of “playing the race card” or seeing things that aren’t there. (Incidentally, it turns out that the basement is actually used for molding of a different sort.)

There are other reasons for Chris to be unsettled: The only other black people on the estate are two servants, Georgina and Walter (Rose’s dad says he knows how bad it looks, but that it’s not what it seems), and something is clearly “off” about them. Later, more white people show up—and one more black character, and he, too, feels “off.”

By the end of the film, we learn the horrible secret: Rose’s family is kidnapping and luring black people to their estate, where they’re being hypnotized and psychologically trapped inside themselves—Rose’s mom calls it “the sunken place”—so that old or disabled white people’s consciousnesses can be transplanted into their bodies. The white people are then able to move about, controlling their new black bodies, with the black person’s consciousness along for the ride as a mere “passenger.” In a shocking twist, it turns out that even apparently-sweet Rose is in on the plot, and Chris must fight her and the rest of her family to escape.

This isn’t a “white people are evil” film, although it may sound that way at first, but it is a film about racism. I know many of my friends of color will connect with this movie in a way I can’t, so I won’t try to say what I think they’ll get out of it. I do want to say how I connected with it, though, because I think what Jordan Peele has done here is really important for white audiences. 

If you look beyond the surface horror-movie plot, this film actually gives white people a tiny peek at the reality of racism—not the epithet-shouting neo-Nazi kind of racism that white people normally imagine when we hear “racism,” but the “Oh it’s so nice to meet you; I voted for Obama” kind of racism, the subtle othering that expects people of color to smile and get along and adopt white culture as their own whenever they’re around white people.

So many of the moments in Get Out are clearly intended to work on multiple levels. When Chris confronts Georgina about something being wrong and she smiles and says, “No, no no no no no,” with tears streaming down her cheeks, the symbolism is blatant. How often do people of color have to ignore the subtle indignities they face and hide their true emotions in order to avoid coming across as, for example, “the angry black woman/man”? How many times do they find themselves in social situations—even with their closest white friends!—where people make little comments tying them to an “exotic,” supposedly monolithic culture, where they have to respond with a smile and a laugh instead of telling people how stupid and offensive they’re being? 

I can’t tell you the number of these stories I’ve heard from my friends, and I’m quite sure that the stories I’ve heard are only a tiny fraction of the stories that could be told. So there’s something in that moment that speaks volumes about the experiences of people of color in America.

The same is true for so many other moments. The black characters Chris meets at the Armitages’ have all symbolically given up their identities and conformed to white culture; when Chris meets one character, he turns out to be going under a new name, with new clothes and new mannerisms; when Chris offers him a fist bump, he tries to shake Chris’s fist. Again, within the story, there’s an explanation for all this, but every moment here is also about assimilation and culture differences. 

For me as a white audience member, all of these moments did something remarkable: They showed me my own culture—a culture I’m often blissfully unaware of because it’s all around me—as something alien. They reminded me that I, too, have a culture, and that expecting everyone else to assimilate to my culture is just as much an erasing of their identities as it would be to expect me to assimilate to someone else’s culture.

And that’s a big part of what Get Out is about—the erasing of identities, and the power of racism to destroy people. I think it’s really significant that racism is portrayed here very differently from how it’s normally portrayed in movies written by white people. In most Hollywood movies, you know a character is racist because they shout racial epithets or make blatant statements about a certain race’s inferiority. That allows white audiences to say, “I would never do/say that, so I’m not racist!” We really don’t want to think we are.

But notice something important about Get Out’s treatment of racism: This is a film about the literal enslavement of black people—racism doesn’t get more extreme than that—and yet Peele doesn’t go for the obvious by having the white characters admit that they think black people are inferior; instead, they subjugate and dehumanize people by claiming to admire things about them. They turn them into fashion accessories. 

When Chris asks why only black people are being targeted for this procedure, the response is telling: It’s not (supposedly) because the white characters think African Americans are bad, but rather, because they like certain things about them and they want “a change” for themselves. They want to become black—it’s trendy, we’re told!—but without having had any of the actual life experiences or history of African Americans. White people need to see this: to experience the ways in which Chris is othered by people who tell him all the things they like about him—isn’t he strong? Look at those muscles! Does he play golf like Tiger Woods? And he must be well-endowed and have such sexual prowess, right, Rose?

The white people in the audience need to be reminded that just because you’re saying positive things about someone doesn’t mean you’re not being racist, that turning someone into an exotic “other” may not be the same as shouting an epithet, but it’s still taking away someone’s identity and treating them as a commodity.

The film is filled with these kinds of moments. When we realize that Rose’s white grandmother has inhabited the body of Georgina, the fact that she keeps touching her own hair and admiring herself in the mirror takes on a whole new level of significance. (White people, please don’t ask to touch your black friends’ hair.) When Chris connects with a dying deer on the side of the road and later sees a deer head mounted on the wall at the Armitages’ estate, the symbolism is hard to miss. Black people are being turned into trophies in this house. And, oh yeah, they’re being literally auctioned off—as they were in real life in the not-too-distant past.

One day, I’d like to see the film again to pick up on all the ways things read differently the second time through. I noticed several things in retrospect that gain new significance once you know the ending, and I’m sure there’s a lot I didn’t notice. For example, Rose’s dad says he hired Walter and Georgina to care for his parents, and when his parents died, “I couldn’t bear to let them go.” The first time you see the film, it sounds like the “them” is Walter and Georgina. But in retrospect, it’s clear the “them” he couldn’t bear to let go was his parents, so he sacrificed Walter and Georgina for them. Which, again, is an example of how the supposed care of the white characters for the black characters (his care for Walter and Georgina, Rose’s care for Chris) is really all about caring for themselves and treating the black characters as completely interchangeable objects.

The message of the film isn’t simply that the black characters are “good” and the white characters are “bad.” There are presumably—hopefully—many good white people in the world of this film, and many others who wouldn’t do what the Armitages are doing but also probably wouldn’t believe Chris or make the effort to stop it. Peele’s mother and wife are both white, so he’s clearly not trying to paint all white people as villains. 

But I admit, as a white guy, I really, really wanted Rose to be good. I’ve been the white person in an interracial relationship introducing my black boyfriend to my family. I’ve been that. So I related to Rose, and I really wanted to believe that she was well-intentioned and just oblivious; even though she misses the mark on several occasions, there are times that she seems like she gets it and she really does listen to Chris. When a cop asks to see Chris’s ID early in the film even though he wasn’t driving, Rose stands up against the obvious racism, showing us all what it looks like for white people to do the right thing. “That was hot,” Chris says to her later, and I thought, yeah, that’s who I want to be.

So I have to admit, it was really upsetting to me to see Rose, the only good white character left in the film, turn out to be evil. But I realized that part of that is that I really wanted her to represent me, and that’s really the point. Just think how often horror films have only one black character who dies early on, and how many films of all genres have no significant black characters for audience members to look up to or identify with. I think it’s really important for white audiences to experience that.

As I’ve reflected on the film, it seems to me like there are three kinds of popular movies about people of color. There are those that feature POC characters that are essentially indistinguishable from the white characters—as if they just decided to cast Morgan Freeman instead of Tom Hanks without giving any thought to the character’s race. Then there are the movies that deal with racism, but in a way that allows white people to feel good about ourselves, because we’re not like the characters in the film. (This is especially true for movies about racism in the past; some of them are very important films, like Hidden Figures, which I loved, but we need to be aware that it’s still easy for white America to treat it as a feel-good film and think that we’re off the hook because we no longer have separate restrooms.) And finally, there are movies that focus more directly on the lives of people of color but tend to draw largely audiences of color; not many white people go see them, because we think they’re not “for us” (even though we assume films about white people are for everyone).

Get Out isn’t any of those. It’s drawing a broad audience but it’s not afraid to make white people uncomfortable. And if you can give me, a white guy, a chance to have even a momentary fraction of an experience of the real-life, modern-day, casual racism facing people of color in America, I think that’s a very good thing.

Beauty and the Beast isn't what Tumblr's been saying it is.

I can completely get over Emma Watson being Belle for the sheer amount of representation that’s in the film. What representation? 

 Let’s begin (spoiler alert!):

1. Black People in France. Yes, honey. For the first time in my life, I walked into a widely released period piece that doesn’t ignore the existence of black people. Not as mere servants and slaves, but as actual fucking court members and townspeople. Also, interracial couples. Y'ALL. 

 2. Le Fou. I was concerned about this, but he actually undergoes character development. He eventually abandons Gaston and has a change of heart (Disney-style, but I’ll take it). The scene with him “dancing with another man” at the end is led up to- it’s not just random. It doesn’t send the message that gay people are stupid and deserve to be mistreated (Mrs. Potts literally tells him he deserves better), which were my main concerns for this film. TL;DR, the LeFou plotline isn’t what Tumblr made it out to be, I promise.  

 3. The Gender Fluid Character. There is a scene in a which a character normalizes a man in a dress in a positive way. I was expecting him to be mocked, but this doesn’t happen! (Also, I believe this is the same character LeFou dances with at the end). 

 4. Belle teaches a child to read/ LeFou realizes he can’t read. Watson aside, the actual perils of living in 17th century France are explored, like the Plague, and also the importance of literacy. As children’s literacy is very important to me, I LOVED this. 

There’s more, but I think the representation needs to be supported (listen, I almost never see myself in a period piece, I was expecting this cast to be vanilla as hell) and Disney needs to know that we want more of it. 

 ALSO: to the white and non-black POC who straight up lied about the representation in this film, I SEE YOU.

Say It (Jungkook/Reader)

Originally posted by sugutie

Genre: Smut - Inspired by a fic written by Admin JP + Say It by Tory Lanez.

Words: 7.2K+

Author: Admin Kaycie

Summary: Honesty was a trait you had always prided yourself in being strong in possession of, something your friends and fans all admired you for; so the day you announced you did not like Jeon Jungkook, they knew your words were true.

Tags: Dance room rendezvous, slow and sensual sex against the dance studio mirror wall, etc. 


Keep reading

youtube au

  • baz is a beauty guru
  • simon is the cute husband behind the camera
  • baz: *puts on face mask*
  • “do I look sexy now?”
  • we all hear simon laughing in the background
  • he’s in charge of editing too
  • not to mention the countless vlogs every time they go to events
  • “we’re here at hayman island with tarte”
  • “brought my drone with me”
  • takes ootd photos of baz on instagram
  • makes sure the lighting and angle are always on point
  • and husband buys my make up challenge
  • *simon sees promo pictures of baz with benefit*
  • *takes photos with it*
  • “LOOK BABE IT’S YOU”
  • “let’s see how good snow does”
  • and simon knows his shit ok
  • “I literally film you while doing your make up what did you expect”
  • and just
  • everyone loves them ok
  • “and please subscribe to my cha-”
  • *simon sneezing*
  • “whoops”
  • “and this is why people love my blooper reel”
3

I wanted to make my character more natural and realistic. Although people expect the tone of the film to be fantasy, it actually is quite the contrary. It’s an intimate story that feels real. I think of all the Star Wars films released so far, Rogue One is the most real one, which is about the people. The characters are very similar to us. They are heroes with no powers. What they have is a conviction and desire to change reality — Diego Luna discusses his role as Captain Cassian Andor.

Yall need to stop boycotting Spilt

Okay, I usually don’t come on here with my own opinions but I feel the need to speak up. And fuck all yall haters.

Split is the most mental illness empowering movie I have ever seen.

M. Night Shaymalan used great care in handling both illnesses displayed (DID & PTSD) throughout the film. James McAvoy’s performance is well portrayed, chilling, and beautiful. I never felt like his character was a bad person. What I saw was a good man struggling with an illness in his brain and trying to live in a world that broke and triggered him constantly.

The movie itself is, at times, hard to watch but that is expected for a Shaymalan film. In true Shaymalan fashion, this movie is filmed in an artistic way that forces you to face some hard truths without actually having to shove it in your face.

I honestly feel that every person with any kind of mental illness needs to see this movie. I personally walked out of the movie last night feeling empowered and even more accepting of myself because for once the characters with mental illness had the upper hand in both bad and good ways and I had witnessed a movie that not only understood how things can be for a mentally ill person but was able to display both the up and down sides of the illness.

And to top it all off there is a surprise at the end that completely turns the film on it’s head and even changes the world that you believe the film is in.

So basically what I am trying to say is don’t bash this movie until you have seen it. Go see it and if you still feel like it displays mental illness poorly then hate on it all you want.

I, however, want to thank Mr. Shaymalan and his cast and crew for a tense, beautiful, well researched and well put together peice of cinema. This is what movies were meant to be. Thank you for all of your hard work.

So. That moment in His Last Vow that was reversed for the viewers. You know, that 5 second clip of Sherlock “coming out” of his mind palace while in hospital. The heart-rate monitors go backwards. There’s no reason to explain it other than they filmed Sherlock going into his mind palace, then reversed it for the actual episode MERE MOMENTS after making a big deal of the question “Forwards or Backwards”. But WHY would they DO that? Why make Sherlock LOOK like he’s waking up, but in reality manipulate the way the footage is shown, making the viewer believe the opposite of what’s actually happening? It’s not like what’s been happening after that moment is hard to believe or anything and they have to trick people into believing it’s real. Wait a second. Actually *everything* that’s happened since that moment is hard to believe. And it gets worse and worse each episode you go from there. TAB ends in the mind palace and HLV ends in the exact same style. TFP is the television equivalent of a mental breakdown. If there was only one week between episodes of this damn TV show, this kind of rug-pull set up wouldn’t be even slightly weird to consider. That backwards clip of Sherlock actually going into his mind palace in HLV instead of coming out of it is the only clue we have to solving why, literally-speaking, nothing makes sense in this damn show anymore. If the writers don’t follow through on their own idea, that’s on them. But their favorite kind of scenario has been beautifully set up. One of those “I told you, but you didn’t listen” scenarios. The backwards clip in episode 9 is their receipt. I fully expect them to say, “Look at what we did, we had it right there in front of you all for years and nobody cared” when this is all done. Anything less makes no sense. “We told you everything was backwards, we told you everything was mind palace, but nobody listened.” There is absolutely *no* other reason for filming a scene and editing it in backwards for the final version. Anything else is madness.

Lin-Manuel Miranda on His Lifelong Oscars Obsession and Why the Show Still Matters (Guest Column)

The Hollywood Reporter
February 20, 2017

During college, Lin-Manuel Miranda and a friend used to improvise interpretative dance tributes to best picture nominees at their annual Oscar party. “It was a lot of breathing and rolling around,” recalls the creator of the Broadway smash Hamilton. “We had a great Seabiscuit dance one year.”

For the New York-born son of Puerto Rican parents — his father a political consultant, his mother a psychologist — it was just another phase of a lifelong fascination with the Oscars that began when he was growing up in the Inwood section of Manhattan, playing and replaying the telecasts that his family recorded on their VCR. At 37, Miranda is about to cross the threshold from superfan to participant: “How Far I’ll Go,” which he wrote for the Disney film Moana, is nominated for original song, and on Feb. 26, Miranda (with his mother) will attend his first Academy Awards.

It’s an auspicious step in a career that will see him star with Emily Blunt and Colin Firth in Disney’s 2018 Mary Poppins Returns and collaborate with composer Alan Menken on the studio’s live-action The Little Mermaid, one of Miranda’s favorite films and, he reveals here, the gateway to his Oscars obsession.

My brain is a compendium of Oscar moments: Tom Hanks’ beautiful acceptance speech when he won best actor for Philadelphia in 1994. Roberto Benigni climbing over chairs and wanting to make love to everybody in the world when Life Is Beautiful won best foreign-language film in 1999. Kim Basinger presenting in 1990 and telling the audience that one of the best films of the year, Do the Right Thing, was not nominated. For her to take a stand, 25 years before #OscarsSoWhite, was incredible — and impressive because time has shown the prescience of that film.

I expect we’ll see more of that this year. It’s a political time, so I imagine the Oscars will look exactly like your Twitter or Facebook feed. Why should we ignore for three hours what we’re talking about 24 hours a day?

The Oscars were always a family affair when I was a kid. One sort of unintentional tradition we had every year was during the “In Memoriam” part of the show. My family called it the “She died?” section because my dad, who is pop culture-oblivious, would always go, “She died? He died? She died?!” the whole time. So, it was very sad and yet also very funny watching my dad catch up.

When I was a kid, the Oscars felt like this impossibly larger-than-life thing. The first time I felt like I had a horse in the race was in 1990. I was 10, and The Little Mermaid was up for best song and best score. They did that crazy “Under the Sea” number with the late, great Geoffrey Holder and dudes in scuba outfits tap-dancing with flippers. We had a tradition of recording the show on our VHS, and I must have watched it a million and a half times.

There was also an amazing Chuck Workman montage at the beginning of the show that depicted 100 years of filmmaking with classic scores. I was already in love with movies, but this was the most beautiful thing I’d ever seen in my life.

That was the period when Billy Crystal was hosting, and I would memorize his musical spoofs of the year’s top films. He did them with Marc Shaiman, whom I’m working with right now on Mary Poppins Returns… I was a huge fan of those moments and musical numbers — they showed a genuine love of movies while still poking fun at them. I may also be the only person in America who laughed his ass off to “Uma, Oprah. Oprah, Uma.” David Letterman’s commitment to that bit was enough to put it over the top for me. He didn’t care if no one got it. In his head, it was funny.


Hosting the Oscars is not a thing I would ever want to do… You always have to do this dance as a host: You’re playing to a billion people at home, and you’re playing to anxious contestants in a room, and that’s an insanely hard thing to divide. It’s the most thankless task in the world. I have a pretty healthy ego, but it does not extend in that direction. I’d much rather be the guy writing the opening tune than having to deliver it.


Another Oscar moment that really stuck with me was when Whoopi won her best supporting actress for Ghost. I’ll never forget, at the top of her acceptance speech she said, “Ever since I was a little kid, I wanted this,” which is so rare. Then she said, “As a little kid, I lived in the projects, and you’re the people I watched. You’re the people who made me want to be an actor.” For me, it was like she was saying, “If you want this, you can get it, too. I’m proof that you can.”

I had been seeing myself in this world since I was old enough to do anything, and it was as if she reached through the screen to talk to me. I was that kid. Even my mother used to say, “Remember what Whoopi said.”

That speech was the inspiration for the opening song I co-wrote for Neil Patrick Harris, “Bigger,” for the 2013 Tony Awards:

There’s a kid in the middle of nowhere sitting there, living for Tony performances singin’ and flippin’ along with the Pippins and Wickeds and Kinkys, Matildas and Mormonses / So we might reassure that kid and do something to spur that kid  / ‘Cause I promise you all of us up here tonight, We were that kid and now we’re bigger


Another of my favorite moments was in 2005, when they had Antonio Banderas sing “Al Otro Lado Del Rio” from The Motorcycle Diaries, which was nominated for best song. And then when Jorge Drexler, who composed it, won, he went onstage and sang it, like, “This is how it really goes.” It was so funny and ballsy and great. I’m happy whenever Latinos win anything, so I was thrilled by both performances.

I can’t tell you what it feels like in that room because this will be my first time at the Oscars, but I can tell you why the Oscars matter. It’s a night when the arts and artists are formally honored, and this recognition is seen by millions of people across the country and around the world. The show inspires people to keep pursuing their craft, or to seek out the nominated films or the overall body of work of the nominees, and through that exposure, people gain a greater appreciation of what the art of filmmaking brings to our culture.

Guide to TV Tropes, Part 1: Tropes are Not Bad

Pylon @constablewrites here! You may know me as the one who likes sending people to TV Tropes. The site is a fantastic resource and can really help writers develop their understanding of story–but it can also be intimidating and frankly dangerous. So I’m here to share some wisdom not just about the site, but about the idea of tropes in the first place.

What is a trope?

Let’s start by defining terms here. For our purposes, a trope is a specific storytelling element that is recognizable in multiple works. The concept of having characters, of stories having acts like plays, of multiple plotlines, all those basic, fundamental concepts are technically tropes.

This is a very broad definition, but that’s on purpose. It’s difficult to discuss something that doesn’t have a name, so that’s what tropes are: a way to give names to those concepts and elements we recognize so we can talk about them, and so that we can be clear that we’re talking about the same thing.

But people talk about tropes like they’re a bad thing.

When someone uses “trope” in a pejorative way, they’re usually talking about a trope that is deployed uncritically, without new context. Tropes can very easily become cliches when they get regurgitated wholesale, but that does not make a trope inherently bad, and that doesn’t mean that new life can’t be breathed into tired tropes.

So why is it important to know tropes?

Essentially, it’s hard to break the rules effectively if you don’t know what they are. Media doesn’t exist in a vacuum; your story is in conversation with everything that came before and everything that will come after. You know that guy who tries to hide that he came to class late, until he smugly makes a point that was already thoroughly discussed 20 minutes ago? Don’t be that guy. (Want to know how many people are out there hawking Hunger Games clones who genuinely have no idea that franchise exists? It’s a much higher number than you just thought of, I promise you.)

What about originality? If it’s been done before it’s not original!

Think of tropes like Lego bricks. It’s not about what bits you have, it’s about how you put them together. That’s how you can take most of the same pieces from this:

…and end up with this:

Take a bunch of spy tropes that have been overused to the point of parody and give them to superheroes, and you have something that feels fresh. A stock character that’s usually male might look very different as a female, even if they otherwise fulfill the same role. Throwing film noir and detective tropes into a setting with magic and monsters invented a whole new genre. And so on. You don’t have to reinvent or twist every element to have something new; you can get just as much mileage out of turning a single trope on its head and thoroughly exploring the implications of that.

Ultimately, you can’t mess with audience expectations if you don’t know what they are. That one death in Avengers: Age of Ultron completely shocked me because the movie is screaming at the top of its lungs that it’s gonna kill a different character. (Worth noting is that I saw it with a friend who didn’t pick up on those cues at all, and thus had a completely different reaction. Knowing those expectations can cut both ways.) Tropes represent the shared language of storytelling that your readers have learned, consciously and subconsciously, and are bringing to the table. You need to understand that language if you want to speak to them effectively.

Hopefully now you understand why it might be beneficial to spend some time on TV Tropes. But don’t dive in just yet! Otherwise you’ll emerge blinking into the light a week later, muttering about egregious sliding scales and realizing that no one’s been feeding your cat and you probably don’t have a job anymore. Tune in next time where we’ll discuss how to use the site effectively and avoid the black hole.


Edit by Werew: Here is the next part of this post! Happy Troping!

I can’t believe those parents from that daddyofive channel are straight up blaming Phil for all the flack they’re getting???

Nobody is reacting the way they are to them because of what Phil said. He didn’t have to say anything, the clips from their own channel spoke for themselves. All Phil did was see kids potentially in danger and blew the whistle on it. What kind of person would he be to look away from children in need?

They’re claiming the videos are fake, which I don’t buy, but even if they faked the videos, I don’t understand what kind of reaction they expected? How do you put up videos of you yelling at, cussing at, and man handling your kids and not expect someone to try to jump in and defend those kids? It’s already fucking wild to me that it went on so long before someone finally said something.

Fake or not, you sat there and filmed, edited, and posted these videos, not seeing anything wrong with the content, and that’s still a huge fucking problem. It was aggressive, abusive, disturbing, and not in the least bit funny. You can’t just be like “but they’re for entertainment!” and be absolved of everything. The fact that they think that’s entertainment in and of itself is concerning to me.

Whatever, I dunno, I just thinking blaming someone else for being genuinely scared for your children instead of stepping back and being able to understand what you did wrong is a cop out.

  • okay but elias woke up a little later today - he wasn’t planning on meeting the boys until much later - and he’s surprised when he runs into sana, smuggling food from the kitchen into her bedroom. she’s still in her pyjamas and she isn’t wearing any make up or anything, which, well, it’s nearly 1pm. so it’s a bit odd, especially for her.
  • elias asks her if she’s okay, and why she’s still in her pyjamas. and sana just shrugs and says, quite aggressively, “you’re still in your pyjamas.” and sometimes elias would bite back, tease her, but he also knows when to draw the line. and he can just see that sana’s not in the mood, so he just says, “any plans today?”
  • sana stares at him and shrugs, says, “nei”, then makes her way into her room, shutting the door, and elias leaves her be for a little bit. but a few hours later, elias notices she still hasn’t left her bedroom, which is kind of unlike sana. so he knocks on her door. 
  • she lets him in, but she’s kind of irritated; elias ignores it and says, “what’re you up to?” as he plonks himself on sana’s bed (which causes sana to sigh irritably, but she shuffles a little to give him space to get comfy anyway).
  • “nothing,” sana says irritably; dismissively. elias just looks at her and says, “okay” and waits to see if she elaborates. when she doesn’t, he says, “what was all that about last night?”
  • sana raises her eyebrows. “i’m allowed to have friends around, elias,” she snaps. “you do all the time.”
  • “yeah, but mine don’t drink in the house, and there’s never twenty of us,” elias replies fairly, but not unkindly. he looks at her, notices how deflated she seems, how upset she looks, and so he just says, “is everything okay?”
  • “yes,” sana says quickly. “everything’s fine.” which - okay, okay, sana isn’t in the mood for talking. that’s fine. so, elias says, “how about a movie?”
  • sana looks at him, frowning, and says, “what movie?”, and elias tells her that there’s this film on today, the one they used to watch all the time when they were little. and sana, despite herself, smiles at the memory, and laughs when elias does a (very bad) impression of one of the main characters. and elias thinks there is nothing that makes him quite as proud as when he makes his baby sister laugh.
  • they end up reheating leftovers from the other night and sit cross-legged on the sofa together, watching this film, which is funny but kind of cheesy and not actually as good as either of them remember it being, but it’s okay, because sana’s smiling a lot more now; seems more content.
  • elias’ phone rings just as the films ending and shit, time got away from him; he’d agreed to see the boys today. he picks up the phone and starts talking to them, to adam, and says, “just come over to mine, man, it’s chill, my parents are–” but then he catches sana’s expression; it’s small, subtle, the way her eyes fall to her lap and she prods at her food a little disinterestedly. maybe other people wouldn’t notice it, but elias does. so, he says, “actually, guys, sorry, film without me today, i forgot i made other plans.”
  • the boys erupt into indignant shouts about loyalty and how important their youtube channel is, but elias silences them, hangs up the phone, and sana says, “what other plans do you have?”
  • “well, they made a sequel to this film, and i think it’s stupid that neither of us have seen it”. and okay, he expects that to make sana smile, but instead she frowns and says, “but they aren’t airing the sequel at the moment.” so elias rolls his eyes, then says, “we’ll just have to find something else to watch, then.” and sana looks at him for a moment before rolling her eyes and saying, “okay. find something, then.”
  • she may not have said it, but she didn’t need to, because elias can already tell that sana’s feeling just that little bit better. and he’s so glad to see it, because he really hates seeing sana upset; can’t stand it, because despite how much he teases her, he truly does think there’s no one in the world who deserves happiness quite as much as his sister. and maybe that’s why, when they squabble over the last portion of food, elias lets sana have it. just this once.
#DateMeBuckyBarnes (Part 15)

Summary: When Hollywood’s heartthrob Bucky Barnes breaks up with his girlfriend, you jokingly tag him in a selfie on Instagram to express your desire to date him. What you don’t expect is a response from the man himself [Modern AU].

Word Count: 1,149

‘#DateMeBuckyBarnes’ Masterlist

A/N: Shoutout to @lovellylittlelonely for reading this over and sending words of encouragement :) I really need to try to cut down the length of these chapters, my gosh. 

Originally posted by littlemisssyreid

You entered the apartment building a little after seven in the evening. Due to Daisy’s insistence, you had dinner with her and Jemma after work to discuss the upcoming projects at the company. Discussion about your ‘blossoming’ relationship with Bucky came up as well which didn’t surprise you. In almost every conversation you had with your friends, he always came up. 

Over two months have passed since Bucky’s impromptu road trip to the seaside occurred, and your relationship with him changed after that moment. Bucky became a big part of your life and everyone noticed. Aside from your friends, the celebrity news and social media sites kept talking about what went on between you and Bucky. Unsurprisingly, the attention didn’t faze him at all, but he hated the fact that everyone pried into your life.

Keep reading

I just can’t believe that people that are fans of this film franchise want the hero and the villain to get together. They actually want our hero to be with the man who tortured her and tried to kill her friends

These people want young girls in that movie theatre to see their hero and role model become some kind of “magic healing woman” to redeem an evil character

How is that any kind of example to set for young girls? How on earth can you expect them to have to watch their idol be with her abuser? What kind of message does that send them?

Lefou's "Gay Moment"
  • What I expected: a simpering comic relief character fawns over the buff hetero villain, dies a villain.
  • What I got: A surprising arc of a man who lives in 18th century France finding safety and comfort with his best friend, a war hero. Sure he fawns a little, but he starts to realize Gaston is a goddamn sociopath. He's forced to choose between his own morality and his tenuous personal safety. The film doesn't sugarcoat the character's sexuality and make's it abundantly clear that this is a gay character. Josh Gad plays the role with depth, sincerity, and wit. He isn't a disposable sidekick and is a focal character in his own right.
  • Also: There's a scene where a dude is "forced" to cross dress that is entirely played for comedy. Two steps forward, one step back.