but the book was so solid

miscellaninousgarbage  asked:

What's a neutron star? I read about them in Bill Bryson's book, but I couldn't figure out why a neutron start would happen in the first place?

When massive stars collapse, the core of the star gets compressed extremely tightly by the force of its own gravity. As the core collapses, the electrons and protons in the core get closer and closer together. Eventually, the core gets so dense that the electrons and protons are forced together, combining into neutrons. The entire core becomes essentially a solid ball of neutrons, as dense as an atomic nuclei. The outer layers of the star, which are also rushing in towards the core, bounce off of this rock-hard layer of neutrons and whiz off into space, creating a supernova and leaving behind a neutron star at the center. And all of this happens in less than a second. Pretty wild. To summarize: neutron stars are giant balls of neutrons that resulted when a stellar core collapsed and became so dense the protons and electrons combined into neutrons. 

Side note: Robert L. Forward wrote a really interesting novel called Dragon’s Egg, which was about intelligent life on a neutron star! It’s quite an interesting read, and you learn a whole lot about neutron stars since the author has a Ph.D in physics. If you want a copy, you can find it here; you won’t find it at a bookstore because it’s out of print, but you can find a used copy online (I linked to one). Let me know if you have any other questions, I’m happy to answer them!

birealist  asked:

While I find the sparkling vampires very original and interesting, I really hate the whole marble skin thing. I used to think it was because because humans were so fragile that vampires felt really hard in comparison but the more I read the more I understood that SM truly intended for her vampires to be stone hard. In the Bree Tanner book, she actually said, "just stone lips, no give." That's just weird, unnecessary, and unromantic.

There’s a lot in Bella’s narration that I understood to be hyberpole or metaphor, only later for SM to clarify like, no, they really DO feel like stone, and feel like ice, and all that. I had just thought Bella was being poetic and exaggerating. 

Because, like, how would that work? How could Carlisle, with ice-cold, marble-solid hands handle patients all day and no one is like ???

So I still think of it as mostly hyperbole/metaphor, and a little truth. Carlisle’s touch being cold (but not literally icy. .. and he carries around hot coffee mugs all the time to warm his hands), and his handshake being weirdly firm but not obviously marble works in my head.  

I seem to mentally block out that Bree Tanner thing because that’s just really bizarre and not at all romantic or appealing. And if that’s the sound they make when they kiss, what would sex sound like? I just can’t see them as actual living statues, clunking around stonily everywhere they go. The clickety-clack kisses also don’t really seem to correspond to Bella’s descriptions post-vampiring in BD where she describes Edward as feeling warm and soft to her now that she’s also a vampire–so wouldn’t Victoria and Riley’s lips have seemed soft to each other? 

So my boyfriend’s school district had to put out a statement about 13 reasons why because there has been a significant increase in students cutting themselves and attempting suicide because of that show. Like when you talk to them about it, they specifically reference that show. Students are telling each other that they’ll be “one of the reasons.” School counselors a have been booked solid for weeks. So what can we do to get Netflix to take down this shitty shitty show.

musical theatre songs that i will literally stop my entire life to sing along to
  • ring of keys (fun home)
  • waving through a window (dear evan hansen)
  • non-stop (hamilton) 
  • la vie boheme (rent) 
  • spooky mormon hell dream (book of mormon)
  • come to the fun home (fun home) 
  • yorktown (hamilton) 
  • defying gravity (wicked)
  • 96,000 (in the heights)
  • satisfied (hamilton) 
  • take me or leave me (rent) 
  • dancing through life (wicked) 
  • king of new york (newsies)
  • revolting children (matilda) 
  • letters (natasha, pierre, and the great comet of 1812)
  • hasa diga eebowai (book of mormon) 
  • blackout (in the heights)
  • i’m alive (next to normal)
  • the schuyler sisters (hamilton)
  • carnaval del barrio (in the heights)
  • man up (book of mormon)
  • what is this feeling? (wicked) 
  • sincerely, me (dear evan hansen)
  • your fault (into the woods) 
  • we both reached for the gun (chicago)
  • one day more (les miserables) 
  • bad idea (waitress)
  • so much better (legally blonde)
My thoughts on ‘Tales From The Yawning Portal’

I received my advance copy of @dndwizards​’s new book Tales from the Yawning Portal not quite a week ago. If you haven’t heard of this book here’s the gist of it:

TftYP is a collection of seven ‘classic’ dungeon adventures from D&D editions past, all updated with fifth edition rules. In this book you get…

  • Against the Giants (AD&D)
  • Dead in Thay (D&D Next)
  • Forge of Fury (D&D 3e)
  • Hidden Shrine of Tamoachan (AD&D)
  • The Sunless Citadel (D&D 3e)
  • Tomb of Horrors (AD&D)
  • White Plume Mountain (AD&D)

All of the maps and layout have been updated to make them easier on the eyes, while their traps, monsters, structure, and challenges remains largely unchanged. TftYP is a ‘best of’ book, rather than a remake or reboot of these adventures.

If you’re a millennial who got into D&D through things like Acquisitions Inc, The Adventure Zone, or Critical Role, my take on this book is gonna be of interest to you…because this book might be specifically FOR YOU.  

Originally posted by ewzzy


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Possibly unpopular opinion here, but I cannot stand the use of “realistic” casual dialogue. Ums and uhs and wells and yeahs and… random bouts of trailing off in the middle of sentences. 

You don’t want to write realistic dialogue. You want to write dialogue equivalent to your brain’s understanding of realistic dialogue.

The broken, casual phrasing might be natural, word for word. It might even sound natural to the person who’s writing it. But it doesn’t align with the way we comprehend speech. It doesn’t account for the work our subconscious does in order to dissect and analyze speech patterns, to take in a stream of disjointed words and create a concrete meaning.

In real life, we have the privilege of being entirely engulfed in the conversation, of experiencing every visual and vocal cue, and quite often of knowing the particular tendencies of the person we’re speaking with. The reader never has this. They are constantly limited to only what is stated on the page, brought to them at exactly the speed they read it.

In real life, we also have the redundancy of being a part of boring, anti-climatic conversations. Real conversations generally go nowhere. They’re fun for the people in them, but useless to everyone else. This isn’t what you want in you writing. You want dialogue that says something, with every sentence, every phrase, every line. 

Casual speech and inter-dialogue pacing (aka, the ‘…’ syndrome) has it’s place, but it’s place it not to show normalcy, but to emphasis difference. ‘Um, well… yeah’ is a stagnate, worthless line when used many times in the same story, but when used only a few times, in a book where the rest of the dialogue says what it means, it becomes an obvious sign of embarrassment and hesitation, even fear. 

So write the sort of solid, easily comprehended dialogue that allows your readers to subconsciously apply pacing, without visual cues like ‘…’ or the unless addition of yeah and well, or any other removable words or phrases.

Don’t write the exact words said. Write the meaning behind them.

Disclaimer below the cut:

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How to Learn a Language Naturally: Back to the Basics

        Lately as I’ve been gradually getting back into independent language learning I’ve found myself struggling with where to begin. Every textbook I would take out would leave me bored and frustrated with either the simplicity or the level it was placed at relative to where I was at that time; yet without some sort of direction, I felt lost. Already battling against lack of motivation, creating a self-study program from scratch seemed like an incredibly daunting task. However, after taking a step back I’ve begun to see other approaches that I can take to learn the language in a more natural way – turning away from standard study that leaves me unmotivated, and focusing instead on fun and entertaining ways of language application. Here is what I’ve come up with.


Starting off as a beginner:

        My greatest and first word of advice for starting off as a beginner in your target language would be to start looking around websites such as Memrise and Quizlet for lists of most commonly used words. The “Learn [Language] in 200/300 words” posts on Tumblr by @funwithlanguages are also a great place to start. Start working on pronouns, general sentence structure or basic phrases, and learning the overall conjugation patterns for the most basic verbs. Flashcards and index cards are incredibly useful here. This will give you a good foundation off of which you can build further.

        In addition, having some sort of structured course, such as the Teach Yourself series or many available courses on Memrise that teach vocabulary connected with dialogues, is extremely helpful. It has been scientifically proven that a person learns vocabulary much faster when they have some sort of emotional connection formed, and by learning words in context, it is much easier to remember what something means and how it is used.

Reading/Speaking:

Find some good, easy, dual-language books to start off with. Go through them chapter by chapter, making sure to read each paragraph in only the target language before going back and looking up/checking unknown words. Read each section multiple times as to ensure comprehension, and, even better, read it to yourself out loud while working on pronunciation. Later, as you become more advanced, you can move on to books entirely in your target language, and try to write your own definitions of unknown words using the given context before checking them yourself.

Search for different news sources from countries where your target language is spoken. Read through the article and write your own summaries of events.

Try changing the language settings on your phone or social media accounts to your target language, and make note of any new vocabulary – don’t allow yourself to go on autopilot.

Challenge yourself to make short vlogs or general videos in your target language. If needed, feel free to write a script to read off of; otherwise, challenge yourself to speak purely off the top of your head – using as much as you know, even if your sentences start off broken.

Set up Skype sessions with native speakers and practice communicating using whatever knowledge of your target language you possess. If you are unsure of a word, try to use others to describe it instead of resorting to your native language (or even just ask how you would say something using your target language).

Look up the lyrics to different songs in your target language and practice translating. Similarly, try translating other songs into your target language.

Writing:

Find native speakers who would be willing to communicate with and correct you, and practice conversing using only your target language (no matter how often you need to use a dictionary – but make sure you take note of any new vocabulary or concepts you come across!).

Practice writing status updates (whether on a private account or not), journal entries, essays, or fictional pieces in your target language. If able, see if you can find a native speaker who would be willing to give you corrections, or simply post your text on Lang8!

Listening:

Youtube is a great resource for all levels of language learning. Try searching for content creators that make videos in a genre you enjoy, and utilize their channels to practice your listening skills and inferring from context while immersing yourself. Write down any words you are unsure of to look up later.

Music in your target language – listen for words you recognize, and look up those you don’t. Things like lyrics are much more likely to stick in your memory, so use that to your advantage!

Look around for an online radio that broadcasts news in your target language, or even an online news source that posts or broadcasts video.

Watch films in your target language, even if it’s content that was originally in English. Many DVDs come with dubs in other languages depending on where you’re from, and Netflix (especially Netflix Original Series) also offers many different dub and subtitle options depending on the content. Even YouTube occasionally has films or TV episodes uploaded in other languages, so long as you look hard enough.

Grammar:

When it comes to grammar, it is important to have a good, solid grammar book that breaks down all basic ideas into something that is comprehensible. Don’t start off with learning grammar right away, however; give yourself some time to really soak up the language itself and get used to basic concepts first. Once you’re at a higher level, being able to properly break down your target language and put it back together will substantially help your progression to fluency.

Incorporate practice sentences into your writing, utilizing each concept. By forcing yourself to physically use each grammatical structure in a context you’ve come up with yourself, it will be much easier for you to master each idea, as well as help it to become more natural.

Hopefully this was helpful in some way! Good luck, and happy language learning!

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     Smithsonian’s National Air & Space Museum Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, offers the unique sight of a complete Mercury spacecraft. Many of these spacecraft are available for viewing all over the United States, but this one is special because it did not fly.

     During the course of a Mercury flight, several parts of the spacecraft are jettisoned and not recovered, including the retro package. This piece of equipment is visible here in my photos as the striped metal object strapped to the bottom of the heat shield. This small cluster of solid rocket motors was responsible for the safe return of the astronaut from space, making just enough thrust to change the shape of the orbit so that it would meet the atmosphere and use aerobraking for a ballistic reentry.

     If this package had not fired properly, the astronaut would be faced with the dire situation of being stuck in orbit. Fortunately, this never happened in real life, but it was captured in the fanciful novel “Marooned” by Martin Cardin, in which a NASA astronaut was stranded on orbit after his retro rockets failed. When the book was released in 1964, it was so influential that it actually changed procedures for Mercury’s follow on program Project Gemini, adding more redundancy to the spacecraft’s reentry flight profile.

     Alan Shepard, the first American in space and later Apollo 14 moonwalker, didn’t fail to notice that there was a leftover spacecraft at the end of the Mercury program. He lobbied for a second Mercury flight in this ship, speaking personally to both NASA Administrator James Webb and President John Kennedy about this flight. He told them his idea of an “open ended” mission in which they would keep him in orbit indefinitely until there was a malfunction or consumables began to run out. Webb stated (and Kennedy agreed) that it was more important to shelve the Mercury spacecraft in order to jump start the more capable Gemini Program. Thus, we now have this whole Mercury on display for future generations to appreciate.

Theories (Peter Quill)

Pairing: Peter Quill x OC

Warnings: None…tiny, tiny spoiler for Vol. 2

A/N: This might be complete crap, but I desperately needed to write some Quill. I hammered this out earlier this morning and just did a quick edit, no rewriting. But hopefully it’s post worthy! I think a second part is in order? xD

PART TWO HERE


Originally posted by despairingfever

The sound of bickering voices drifted back from the cockpit, making me roll my eyes. I lowered the manuscript I was flipping through.

“Will you two morons cut it out already?” I hollered. I waited a beat, but the arguing went on. Probably hadn’t even heard me. Anyways, it wasn’t my job to break up the idiotic pissing contest that went on between Rocket and anyone he met. Or at the moment, Drax.

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intrepid-fool  asked:

I'm new to Terry Pratchett and want to get into Discworld. Is there any order to read them in? I picked one of the shelf randomly and I'm really interested in stories with Tiffany Aching.

So, as a disclaimer, before I scare you away: it is part of Discworld fandom tradition to present newcomers with the Reading Flowchart

It is also part of Discworld fandom tradition to help the Fandom Newbie find an order of reading tailored Specifically For You, because, Newcomer, we’re your own personal reading assistant. 

As you probably know, the Discworld books are separated into series based on which sets of characters appear in them - so you have the Witches, the City Guards, Death & Co., Rincewind and Tiffany Aching, along with a bunch of standalones. 

The books can be read in any order - either by publishing order or series order, or just randomly choosing one with your eyes closed and going from there. I personally had no order in which I read them. After two kind of lukewarm experiences (Moving Pictures and Reaper Man) I decided to try again and just picked up the one that was the thickest and went from there. It was Jingo and then I read Thief of Time and Night Watch, then Feet of Clay and then Guards! Guards! and then Men at Arms. NO CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER, WE GET CONFUSED LIKE MEN

If you like the Tiffany Aching books, you should definitely check out the rest of the Witches series (starting with Wyrd Sisters -> Witches Abroad -> Lords and Ladies -> Carpe Jugulum), because Granny and Nanny both make appearances in the TA books, and they help establish The Meaning of Witching. (The Tiffany Aching books technically take place after the last Witches book, Carpe Jugum, but I’ve always enjoyed Tiff on her own and reading the Witches books alongside that. )

From the witches, most people move onto Death & Co. or Rincewind. 

But. BUT

What next? What’s after that? The series sprawls 40-something books, that’s a lot of options, right?

The flowchart I linked to is kind of outdated though, and also doesn’t give you any idea about how jump from one series to another. 

So…I made a new one. 

(Full size

I know this looks overwhelming. Let me explain the legend of this thing. 

The dotted lines are non-essential connections, in that they’re short stories or tie-in books. I know I threw Colour of Magic and Light Fantastic under a bus there, but they are generally considered the weakest books - this was before any solid worldbuilding. 

The deep green arrows are pretty straightforward - sometimes one book links to another, even though they’re not in the same series. For example, Thief of Time has a Plot Event that kickstarts the story of Night Watch, even though they have two completely (almost) separate sets of characters. The Lords and the Ladies deal with elves, which we see more of in Wee Free Men.

The orange lines are Gateway books, meaning that from there you can easily jump from series to another because of connecting themes or characters. 

For example, if you start with Tiffany Aching and the Witches, you’ve been in the countryside of Lancre the whole time - until you get to Maskerade, which takes place in the city of Ankh-Morporkh. That’s a good way to get into the City Watch and Industrial Revolution-themed books, because it’s an introduction to big city life from the point view of one of its characters. So you can continue with the Witches series after Maskerade, or you can hop onto either the City Guards series or to The Truth and the Moist von Lipwig series. 

The red ones are thematically connected books. Small Gods deals with belief and religion on the Disc, and the creation of god, god-like and sacrilegious figures, which is a theme that crops up repeatedly - like in Hogfather, Wintersmith, I Shall Wear Midnight, Snuff, Going Postal. Pyramids deals with succession crisis, which becomes a recurring theme in Men at Arms, even though they’re set thousands of years apart. The same goes for Moving Pictures, The Truth and Going Postal - the first two are standalone books, but they deal with urban development of Ankh Morporkh, despite having different sets of characters. 

Again, I want to stress that you don’t have to follow this at all. You can easily pick up a random book from the Tiffany Aching series and go in whichever direction you want - this isn’t Star Wars, where you have to slog through 3 badly-directed movies to get the gist of the story. The books are brilliant in their own right - some of the earlier ones are hit-and-miss, but the later ones are generally considered to be quite enjoyable. 

It’s just that all books contain a call-back two to an earlier book - which can be easy to miss if you’re not reading in the right order. A lot also have interconnecting themes and cameos, which can be really delightful to find. 

So that is why we write several-paragraph-long essays.

And if you’re still here, and I haven’t scared you off yet….go forth and read. 

(Disclaimer: I have not read any of the Rincewind books, except for Interesting Times, which didn’t really impress me. I’m open to opinions on those books, however)

10

POI favorite shots:

↳ Characters: John + doorways

Empty Libraries

Pairing: Lin Manuel Miranda x Reader

Request: Could you do something fluffy w Lin, idk why but could you?- anon

Summary: “you’re talking to yourself in a silent library about how much you hate studying and how you’re going to fail, need help? i just so happen to major in that subject and oh shit, you’re really cute”

Warnings: first fic? otherwise just lots of fluff and a little awkward Lin.

A/N: have fun, and I’d really appreciate feedback!

Word Count: 1929

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Dangerous Man (John Wick x Reader)

Originally posted by anothermoviepage

Working at The Continental isn’t at all what you thought it’d be. 

SPOILER FREE FIC.


You smoothed out your shirt and looked in the mirror. It was your first day on the job. You were decked out head to toe in brand new clothes. All from a designer you’d never heard of. All custom made to fit you perfectly.  All completely free. On top of that, you’d be making a salary that, at entry level, was six figures. And all you had to do was deliver room service.

But there was a saying you’d heard since you were young: If it’s too good to be true, then it probably is.

You should have suspected something was off when you had to give a blood sample, a urine sample, a DNA swab, and answer a thirteen page questionnaire that included things like “list the full names of your parents, siblings, and grandparents” or “do you have any experience with sutures, cauterization, or CPR?”

And then the interview, itself, felt more like an interrogation. The whole thing gave you this weird feeling in your gut, but this was also the most exclusive hotel in New York City. Getting a room here wasn’t about whether or not you had the money, but whether or not you knew the right people, and even then, it was typically booked solid. You’d even heard a rumor that The Queen of England was denied a room once. Of course they’d be picky about their staff.

But after the lengthy interview process and dozen or so signatures on papers you probably should have read, you found out the truth about The Continental.

The manager’s name was Winston. He was nice enough, though he had a very “no nonsense” attitude about him. The more you found out about the place, though, the more you understood why. It was a safe haven for a secret society of people. Assassins. Hit men. Gang Lords. The underground elite of not only New York, but the entire world. The only currency accepted from customers were gold coins. One gold coin was the equivalent to one favor. It was a simple system, Winston explained, but complex to newcomers. You’d pick it up over time. All you needed to know was that if you got a coin, you kept a close eye on it.

Additionally, the hotel followed a strict set of rules, but the two that most concerned you were that staff was never to ask questions, and no business could ever be conducted on hotel grounds. The latter of the two should have made you feel safer, but instead, it just made you more nervous.

Upon the conclusion of your meeting with Winston, he presented you with a single gold coin. You looked at him curiously. He smiled, and said simply:

“A welcome gift.”

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I had one of those days today where ANYTHING I drew was just terrible and my motivation was rock bottom - I thought that I was at the start of an art block so I tested that theory by going back to my solid rock which is SJMaas’s beaut characters <3 

Turns out the art block is null and void as I managed to get Feyre out of my head and onto paper *PHEW* 

I’ve Been Reading  Instruction For American Servicemen In Britain 1942

So Instruction For American Servicemen In Britain 1942 is a reproduced typescript of what was giving to men going over to Britain to help ease friction with the populace. And I thought I would share my favorite parts of the text.


You will naturally be interested in getting to know your opposite member, the British solider, the “Tommy" you have read and hear about. 


BRITISH RESERVE, NOT UNFRIENDLY. You defeat enemy propaganda not by denying that differences exist but by admitting them openly and then trying to understand them. For British are often more reserved in conduct than we. On a small island where forty-five million, each man learns to guard his privacy carefully- and is equally careful not to invade another man’s privacy.

So if Britons sit in trains or buses without striking up a conversation with you, it doesn’t mean they are being and unfriendly. Probably they are paying more attention to you than you think. But they don’t speak to you because they don’t want to intrusive or rude.


Another difference.The British have phrases and colloquialisms of their own that may sound funny to you. You can make just as many boners in their eyes. 


DON’T BE A SHOWOFF. The Britsh dislike bragging and showing off. American wages and American soldier’s pay are the highest in the world. (This line about American pay and how you should not flaunt it is said so many times in this book that it’s hilarious.) 


THE BRITISH ARE TOUGH. Don’t be misled by the British tendency to be soft-spoken and polite. If they need to be, they can be plenty tough. The English language didn’t spread across the ocean and over the mountains and jungles and swamps of the world because these people were painty-waists.


You won’t being able to tell the British much about ‘taking it.’ They are not particularly interested in taking it anymore. They are far more interested in getting together in solid friendship with us. So that we can all start dishing it out to Hitler


THE BEST WAY to get on in Britain is very much the same as the best way to get on in America.  The same sort of courtesy and decency and friendliness that go over big in America will go over big in Britain. The British have seen a good many of Americans, and they like Americans. They will like your frankness as long as it is friendly. They will expect you to be generous. They are not given to back-slapping, and they are shy about showing their affections. But once they get to like you they make the best friends in the world


KEEP OUT OF ARGUMENTS. You can rub a Britisher the wrong way by telling him “We came over and won the last one.”


Once again, look, listen, and learn before you start telling the British how much better we do things. (This is the best line) 


The British don’t know how to make a good cup of coffee, and you don’t know how to make a good cup of tea it’s and even swap.

hc that nursey and dex are secretly really good at what the other person is majoring in

nursey secretly is a genius and is actually super good at pretty much all STEM subjects, but he grew up reading a lot and while he’s great at all of those typical nerd subjects he’s only really passionate about lit and poetry which is why he chose english as a major

meanwhile dex is actually a literature NERD and he did really fucking well in high school english and he really loves writing, and for the longest time he wanted to pursue that, but because of his upbringing he decided to pursue comp sci as a major. and he isn’t even particularly good at comp sci and engineering and maths??? but he chose a major that was ~practical~ and would give him the most job prospects bc after his childhood in a small town where everyone knew everyone, he wanted out, he wanted to leave, and he knew to do that he needed a steady source of income, had to earn enough money to actually sustain himself.

so on top of nursey being attractive af and kinda annoying, dex kinda resents him for basically going after the future that he really wanted. dex HATES that nursey essentially has everything he wants

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journeytomyinnerpeace  asked:

Which are your top 10 funniest moments in the harry potter books?

THEY’RE NOT IN ANY ORDER ! but here we go….

1.  One morning in mid-December, Hogwarts woke to find itself covered in several feet of snow. The lake froze solid and the Weasley twins were punished for bewitching several snowballs so that they followed Quirrell around, bouncing off the back of his turban

2. Fred and George, however, found all this very funny. They went out of their way to march ahead of Harry down the corridors, shouting, “Make way for the Heir of Slytherin, seriously evil wizard coming through…”

3. “Yes - yes, good point, Petunia! What were you doing under our window, boy?
“Listening to the news,” said Harry in a resigned voice.
His aunt and uncle exchanged looks of outrage.
“Listening to the news! Again?
“Well, it changes every day, you see,” said Harry.

4. Why Are You Worrying about You-Know-Who?
You SHOULD Be Worrying About
U-NO-POO -
the Constipation Sensation That’s Gripping the Nation!

5. (Harry, just being greeted by Percy) “Harry!” said Fred, elbowing Percy out of the way and bowing deeply. “Simply splendid to see you, old boy—“
“Marvelous,” said George, pushing Fred aside and seizing Harry’s hand in turn. “Absolutely spiffing.”
Percy scowled.
“That’s enough, now,” said Mrs. Weasley.
“Mum!” said Fred as though he’d only just spotted her and seizing her hand too. “How really corking to see you—“

6. Dudley: They stuff people’s heads down the toilet the first day at Stonewall. Want to come upstairs and practice?
Harry: No, thanks. The poor toilet’s never had anything as horrible as your head down it – it might be sick.

7. Yeah, someone might slip dragon dung in it again, eh, Perce?“ said Fred.
"That was a sample of fertilizer from Norway!” said Percy, going very red in the face. “It was nothing personal!”
“It was,” Fred whispered to Harry as they got up from the table. “We sent it.”

8.  "Oh, are you a prefect Percy? You should have said something we had no idea.”
“Hang on I think I remember him saying something about it, Once…”
“Or twice-”
“A minute-”
“All summer-”
-Fred and George Weasley

9. “We tried to shut him in a pyramid, but Mum spotted us.”
-Fred and George

10. “Lee Jordan was finding it difficult not to take sides.‘So — after that obvious and disgusting bit of cheating —’'Jordan!’ growled Professor McGonagall.'I mean after that open and revolting foul —’'Jordan, I’m warning you —’'All right, all right. Flint nearly kills the Gryffindor Seeker, which could happen to anyone, I’m sure, so a penalty to Gryffindor, taken by Spinnet, who puts it away, no trouble, and we continue play, Gryffindor still in possession.”

REGARDING THE MATCH OF MIDORIYA VS. TODOROKI

After the recent episode of their match, many (mostly anime-only watchers) of you commented

“If Deku hadn’t urged Todoroki to use his fire side, he would’ve won.”

which is… only partially true. But that’s not really the point of my post. The point is seeing Deku as a wonderful main character, unlike many other Mangas.

An endurance match would be a disadvantage for Todoroki, true; but for as long as they are fighting, Deku doesn’t really have a solid chance of winning either, since he hasn’t gotten full control of his powers. So the winner isn’t really fixated.

It is only the early stage of the series, and if you read the manga, you’ll see that even in the later stages of the plot, Deku is still trying to gain control of his powers. <SPOILERS> Bakugou challenged Deku in the later chapters, and still, even with Bakugou at full force (Bakugou and Todoroki have the EXACT same stats except cooperation according to the official character book, available in Wiki) and Deku’s powers at a much more developed state compared to the Sports Festival Arc, Deku LOST.

So, in Deku’s really beat-up state, Todoroki’s ice would’ve – might’ve – still ended him, but it might be a draw in the end if Todoroki hasn’t used his ice and if Deku managed to keep up.

But the most important point I’m making here is that Deku isn’t like your typical Main Character. Typical mainstream manga / anime MCs who always ‘never give up’, ‘has all the world’s courage’, ‘always find a way no matter how hard the road is’, 'has a nasty past but is still shining so brightly always smiling’, and, most importantly, ALWAYS, NEVER FAILS, TO WIN A FIGHT NO MATTER HOW DIFFICULT.

Sure, Deku definitely has some positive Main Character traits in him, but he is different; he has something other Typical MCs don’t, something more. More realistic, he loses a battle. Horikoshi made him not because he’s always made to win and just to move up the path to greatness, but he made him to get something across. Something most stories lack.

It’s the path to victory, the path to being a hero. A hero doesn’t mean you’re always the good guy, or that you’ll always win the fight.

A hero is someone who never fails to seek the needs of someone and save them from it, however difficult and however hard the hero has to sacrifice.

That, is the true value of a hero, one that Horikoshi managed to put in Midoriya Izuku.

It’s not about winning. It’s not about your main character winning. It’s about how your main character affects the people around him / her.