but it's my blog

Hey y’all,

With the most recent tumblr update to mobile apparently completely decimating the tumblr careers of every artist and creator on this site, I figure this is as good a time as any to issue a reminder that reblogging the work of artists you admire on this website is arguably the best way you can support them.

hey. hey. stop scrolling for a sec.

breathe. you’ve made it so far this year. you’ve gotten through so many things that you thought you wouldn’t, and you’ll continue to get though this, whatever it is. i know you can. i believe in you, and i’m so, so proud of you. i know it probably seems impossible, but it’s going to be ok. it’s going to be ok.

breathe in, breath out. and just keep breathing. we’re gonna get there.

Hilda Berg in Threatnin’ Zeppelin

oh and also thnx for comin to the streams when i was making this >:’))

I see a lot of writing advice, particularly about giving characters flaws. The main advice is “everyone has flaws! make sure to give your character flaws or else it’s not realistic!” And after thinking about it… I would like to challenge this.

It essentially posits a view of human nature that there are good and bad traits, and that these traits can be neatly diagrammed into separate columns, one set of which can and should be eliminated. It tends to go along with a view that posits character development should be about scrubbing away of “flawed” traits until the character achieves more a higher level of goodness, or else the character doesn’t and falls into tragedy. This is not untrue, necessarily. There are definitely some “flaws” that are 100% bad and sometimes a good arc is about slowly losing them. However, I could call this advice incomplete.

Consider thinking about it this way. Characters have traits and often whether or not that trait is a flaw is purely circumstantial.

For instance, fairy tales I read as a child. In some, when an old beggar asked for money on the road, it was a secret test of character. The prince who gave the old man money or food would be rewarded. But in other folktales I read, the old beggar would be malevolent, and any prince who stooped to help him would be beaten, punished for letting his guard down. Now, in a story as well as in real life, either of these scenarios can occur–a stranger who asks for help can be benevolent or malevolent. So which is the flaw? Is it a “flaw” to be compassionate? or is it a “flaw” to be guarded? 

Trick question–it’s purely conditional. Both traits are simultaneously a strength and a weakness. Either has an advantage, but either comes with a price as well. And whether the price is greater than the advantage depends on circumstance. The same can be said for most character traits, in fact!

An agreeable character who gets along with everyone will be pressured into agreeing with something atrocious because it’s a commonly held viewpoint. A character who’s principled and holds firm even under great pressure will take much, much longer to change their mind when they are actually in the wrong. A character who loves animals and loves to shower them with affection will get bitten if they try the same on every animal. As the circumstances change, flaws become strengths, and strengths become weaknesses. And even a trait that’s wholly virtuous, such as compassion, comes with a price and can be turned for the worst.

You don’t have to think about inserting flaws into your character. Your character, even the most perfect “Mary Sue,” is already flawed the moment you give her any traits at all. The problem with Mary Sue isn’t a lack of flaws, it’s a lack of circumstances to challenge her properly, to show her paying the natural price. Your job as an author is to create circumstances in the narrative that 1) justify why these traits exist in your character 2) show what your character gains from these traits and then 3) change the circumstances to challenge her. 

Make your character pay the price for their traits, for their choices. And then, when challenged, you can make a hell of a story by showing us how they adapt, or why they stick to their guns anyway.

2

Doods of wolf shifter Kiri and veterinarian Bakugou? I wonder how come the non-human one is always Kirishima when I draw this sort of AUs…

6

Inspired by @junkjack‘s pegoryu pirate AU and this post.

4

He sits in the armchair of his own house - that night, full of friends, family, and colleagues - with a glass of firewhisky in his hand. There is no room for silence when the whole family is gathered to celebrate his birthday. He usually observes more than interacting.

It would not take longer for someone to catch him touching the scar on his forehead while distracted in memories. That night, it was not Hermione. Al is the one who notices the gesture of his father and asks his mother if he was well. Ginny follows Al’s gaze to see the same scene. When she turns to face her son, she has a soothing smile. “He does it sometimes, nothing to worry about”. But that’s not enough yet. It is when Harry finally finds the worried look of his son that Al feels more relaxed. His father pushes his hand away from his forehead and smiles back at him. 

Seeing his second son is like returning to the present. Just to make sure, he tries to find the other ones. And when Ginny calls James’s attention he decides it’s time to get up and walk around the room. When they notice his movements, Lily is faster and pushes his hand while begging him to start opening his birthday gifts. There are too many of them and it would take the whole night to open every single one. But he only needs one. Looking at his family, he knows damn well what it is.

Happy Birthday, Harry James Potter.

[instagram @potterbyblvnk]

anonymous asked:

Michael, how did you think of your YouTuber name? :0c

He suggested the name to me and I guess it sorta stuck-? 

I wasn’t very popular then, obviously, so I didn’t use the account as much, but I made the YouTube channel during the summer after my junior year in high school. So, that was about four years ago. 

Wow… four years. I can’t believe it. It feels so long ago, haha. But it still hurts like it was yesterday.