but accurately named

How to Read Your Birth Chart

The Sun: The Sun speaks about your ego, the ‘I Am’, what drives you to to be who you are and how you identify yourself. In other words, your sun sign reflects who you are all the time, regardless of who you’re with or what you’re doing.

The Moon: The moon speaks about your emotional self and what we need to feel secure, safe and nurtured. We go to our moon when we need to restore ourselves. The moon sign tends to be the ruling force over your decision-making.

The Ascendant/Rising Sign: This sign represents how others see you as. When we first meet someone, we’re likely to meet their rising sign. The ascendant sign changes from hour to hour so try to be as accurate as possible when naming your birth time.

The Descendant Sign: The descendant sign shows the type of people you are the most attracted by, you easily get along well with and you are most likely to start a love relationship with.

The Inner Planets: The inner planets include Mercury, Venus and Mars. They can describe core personality traits, needs and desires. Mercury rules your mind and communication, Venus rules your love life, and Mars rules your actions and overall energy.

The Outer Planets: The outer planets are Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and Pluto. They reflect what will make your life special. Jupiter rules luck and progress, Saturn rules your fears and self discipline, Uranus rules change, Neptune rules dreams and how you heal, and Pluto rules your power and transformation. The placements can suggest what you have to look forward to these areas.

Writing With Color – Featured Research Guides

Although WWC shares resources when we can and bring some to the table ourselves, we don’t exist to seek outside sources for one’s writing; this is ultimately the writer’s job. Even so, we’re more than happy to offer guidance on the What, Where and How of doing research for your inclusive writing. 

Take a look at some of the research help & resources complied below:

Research

Research Sources

WWC Tags and Help

General Research

Cultural and Religious Research 

Historical Research

Fantasy Sci-Fi & Research

Name Research/Resources

Resources

Cultural and Religious Resources

WWC Naming Resources/Guides

–WWC

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“if you love them go get them! What are you waiting for?”

loosely based on a idea where burr sees john drunk ass after talking to hamilton, john apparently heard parts of their conversation. A huge thanks to  @i-am-mysterical ;)

Unnecessary Lotor Meeting Headcanon

Imagine this:

• Lotor first meeting the whole crew planning on attacking but immediately lays his eyes on Lance (I been seeing fan art i needed to jump in, okay??)

• Keith is jealous by how much this guy is paying his full attention to Lance because that’s his what the heck???

• Lotor wanting to take him as a prisoner with intentions of stealing Voltron too

• Lotor dissing Keith everytime he talks or butts in and is a sass king (i just have a feel)

• Uncomfortable Lance, Flirty Lotor, Fuming​ Keith who is ready to fucking explode

• It became Keith vs. Lotor so fast that everyone else just kind of doing their thing and beating off anything trying to attack

• Lance would tease Keith of going to Lotor if he didn’t do something Lance wanted

• It immediately back fires and turns to being Keith pinning Lance to the wall

• Do not mention Lotor

• EVER

• He cradled Lance​ in his arms and it wouldn’t be the same if it wasn’t him even if the little shit denies it

anonymous asked:

As someone with much more knowledge of both European caricature history and Russian culture, could you clarify one thing that's been bugging me for an eternity? Have European powers ever depicted Russia as anything other than a bear or an octopus? Is it ever a person? Not an actual historical figure but a person of its own.

they did! the bear was more popular than the octopus (which only actually occurred in–two maps, I think? maybe three.) but Russia was depicted as a person fairly often, at least at the turn of the century. unfortunately it wasn’t…super flattering. out of every person on the map, the anthropomorphic depictions of Russia were often the most um. aggressively condescending. (note: most of these are dutch or german)

here is a 1914 map of europe by k. lehmann-dumont. the Russian bear is down in the westernmost point, being punched in the snout by Germany. behind him is a enormous bestial cossack, vokda in clawed hand, swinging the scourge of revolution. his fangs are sharp but rotting out, and if you enlarge the map you can see German bees trying to loosen his teeth.  

this one is from 1915, and Russia is only huge, not a monster. it’s depicted as a simple peasant who has had his hand lopped off at the wrist by the tsar’s troubles. vodka makes another appearance. 

another from 1914, by e. zimmerman, and it’s one of my favorites. the Russian bear sprays some sort of acid repellent on the peasant, while said peasant attempts to protect himself. the bear is also holding out an empty wallet and growling “HUNGER”. the peasant is trapped between the acid from the bear and the bayonet of Germany. also everything is on fire. being in Russia in 1914 is very stressful. 

1914, by w. trier. in this one Russia is an enormous, greasy, piglike man, set to gobble up europe. the only thing stopping him is Germany’s gun in his nose and Austria-Hungary’s down his throat. 

1915, by famed Dutch cartoonist Louis Raemaekers. Russia comes off best here, as a bearded man with a drawn saber, trapping Austria-Hungary’s head between his hand and his gigantic boot.

for the most part, Russia’s anthropomorphic depictions have a few things in common

  • sheer, intimidating size
  • a generally unkempt (if not outright filthy) appearance 
  • a look of what you’d call simplicity if you were nice, and animal stupidity if you weren’t
  • some indication of the desperation that was bringing peasants and the industrial workers closer and closer together
  • appetite

like, sure, each nation here is a caricature and each one takes a lot of national stereotypes onboard. most of these are German, after all. so France, still smarting from the Franco-Prussian war, is often shown fleeing; Serbia is drawn as the sneakiest little ratfucker imaginable, and England, harassed by Ireland, is reluctant to join the fray. but Russia, whatever its allegiance, whatever its intent or position, is always a brute. for a young nation caught between east and west, of both and neither, the seat of the third Rome–that stung. and, you know, not to assign too much human emotion to countries (that’s the mapmakers’ job), but just imagine: in less than fifty years, Russia went from being seen as a starving howling dirty peasant, to the most powerful, dangerous nation in the world. choke it down, europe.

3

save him. 

THE LIST

My “Read Around the World” project is essentially my wish to read more than just typically published American authors. I want to read books by people from different parts of the world, who have emigrated from other nations, or who have heritage from other countries in the world. Originally, the project was only going to include books in translation, but due to inadequate funds and resources, I’ve opened criteria and focused more on the concept “read more diversely”. While maybe not entirely accurate in name, I’m very excited to start my Read Around the World project, which focuses on 80 recognized UN nations! 

So, without further ado, for anyone with an interest in what I’ll be reading or looking for some recommendations, my list: 

  1.  Afghanistan: The Pearl that Broke it’s Shell by Nadia Hashimi
  2. Algeria: The Lovers of Algeria by Anouar Benmalek
  3. Argentina: Purgatory by Tomás Eloy Martínez
  4. Australia: Cloudstreet by Tim Winton
  5. Austria: The Reluctant Empress by Brigitte Hamann
  6. Bangladesh: A Golden Age by Tahmima Anam
  7. Belarus: A Factory of Tears by Valzhyna Mort
  8. Belgium: The Life of Hunger by Amélie Nothomb
  9. Brazil: Don Casmurro by Machado de Assis
  10. Bulgaria: Bai Ganyo: Incredible Tales of a Modern Bulgarian by Aleko Konstantinov
  11. Cambodia: Never Fall Down by Patricia Cormack
  12. Canada: Lives of Girls and Women by Alice Munro
  13. Chile: The House of Spirits by Isabelle Allende
  14. China: The Kitchen God’s Wife by Amy Tan
  15. Colombia: One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez
  16. Costa Rica: Costa Rica: A Traveler’s Literary Companion by Barbara Ras
  17. Croatia: The Ministry of Pain by Dubravka Ugrešić
  18. Cuba: Before Night Falls: A Memoir by Reinaldo Arenas
  19. Czech Republic: The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera
  20. Denmark: The Exception by Christian Jungersen
  21. Dominican Republic: In the Time of Butterflies by Julia Alvarez
  22. Ecuador: The Queen of Water by Laura Resau and María Virginia Farinango
  23. Egypt: The Palace Walk: The Cairo Trilogy by Naguib Mahfouz
  24. Finland: The Year of the Hare by Arto Paasilinna
  25. France: The Confidant by Hélène Grémillon
  26. Georgia: One More Year by Sana Krasikov
  27. Germany: Every Man Dies Alone by Hans Fallada
  28. Ghana: Changes: A Love Story by Ama Ata Aidoo
  29. Greece: Freedom or Death by Nikos Kazantzakis
  30. Haiti: The Farming of Bones by Edwidge Danticat
  31. Hungary: Metropole by Ferenc Karinthy
  32. Iceland: Independent People by Halldór Laxness
  33. India: A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
  34. Indonesia: The Rainbow Troops by Andrea Hirata
  35. Iran: The Blood of Flowers by Anita Amirrezvani
  36. Iraq: Nostalgia, My Enemy by Saadi Youssef
  37. Ireland: The Secret Scripture by Sebastian Barry
  38. Israel: A Tale of Love and Darkness by Amos Oz
  39. Italy: My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante
  40. Jamaica: The Book of Night Women by Marlon James
  41. Japan: The Street of a Thousand Blossoms by Gail Tsukiyama
  42. Kenya: Petals of Blood by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o
  43. Latvia: The Earth is Singing by Vaness Curtis
  44. Lebanon: June Rain by Jabbour Douaihy
  45. Lithuania: Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys
  46. Libya: In the Country of Men by Hisham Matar
  47. Malaysia: The Gift of Rain by Tan Twan Eng
  48. Malta: Death in Malta by Rosanne Dingli
  49. Mexico: Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel
  50. Morocco: Dreams of Trespass: Tales of a Harem Girlhood by Fatema Mernissi
  51. Mozambique: Sleepwalking Land by Mia Couto
  52. Nepal: Arresting God in Kathmandu by Samrat Upadhyay
  53. Netherlands: In Lucia’s Eyes by Arthur Japin
  54. New Zealand: The Bone People by Keri Hulme
  55. Nigeria: Half a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  56. North Korea: The Girl with Seven Names by Hyeonseo Lee
  57. Norway: A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen
  58. Pakistan: I am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and was Shot by the Taliban by Malala Yousafzai
  59. Peru: The Time of the Hero by Mario Vargas Llosa
  60. Philippines: Noli Me Tangere by José Rizal
  61. Poland: This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen by Tadeusz Borowski
  62. Portugal: Blindness by José Saramago
  63. Romania: The Land of Green Plums by Herta Muller
  64. Russia: Queen of Spades and Other Stories by Alexander Pushkin
  65. Rwanda: We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow  We Will Be Killed with Our Families by Philip Gourevitch
  66. Saudi Arabia: Cities of Salt by Abdul Raman Munif
  67. Slovakia: The House of the Deaf Man by Peter Krištúfek
  68. South Africa: The Long Walk to Freedom by Nelson Mandela
  69. South Korea: Please Look After Mom by Kyung-Sook Shin
  70. Spain: The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafón
  71. Sri Lanka: Island of a Thousand Mirrors by Nayomi Munaweera
  72. Sweden: The Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
  73. Switzerland: Small World by Martin Suter
  74. Syria: In Praise of Hatred by Khaled Khalifa
  75. Turkey: The Bastard of Istanbul by Elif Shafak
  76. Uganda: Tropical Fish: Tales from Entebbe by Doreen Baingana
  77. Ukraine: Fieldwork in Ukrainian Sex by Oksana Zabuzhko
  78. Uruguay: Open Veins in Latin America: Five Centuries of the Pillage of a Continent by Eduardo Galeano
  79. Vietnam: The Sorrow of War by Bảo Ninh
  80. Zimbabwe: When a Crocodile Eats the Sun by Peter Godwin
Ushijima Wakatoshi may be an antagonist, but he is not a malicious person

@shiratorizawa-headcanons’ recent post reignited the fervour and indignation I feel about popular fanon mischaracterisations of Ushijima, so here we go.

First thing’s first. Ushijima is an antagonist. That much is clear. He is clearly intended to provide opposition to the main characters of the series, pushing them to grow. Their goal has to be accomplished through defeating him.

However, antagonist is not synonymous with evil, or “bad person”. L from Death Note is the antagonist to Light Yagami, but I’m sure everyone knows who poses more of a danger to society between the pair of them.

More importantly, I feel the need to clarify and debunk popular fanon interpretations of Ushijima.

“You should have gone to Shiratorizawa” is a joke that probably everyone who watches Haikyuu!! knows. It’s gone from a slightly funny meme to a stale, overused, tasteless joke. While I do not condemn the use of it as a joke, it has affected the way people view Ushijima’s character.

And is it really accurate or relevant? Name one instance where Ushijima has actually physically said the words “You should have gone to Shiratorizawa.” to Oikawa. When? Yes, he has said that “He should have gone to Shiratorizawa”. To Hinata and Kageyama. And his reason? A powerhouse team like Shiratorizawa that actually makes it to nationals and has a chance of winning would be more beneficial to a setter of Oikawa’s calibre. There is nowhere in canon where he has stalked, harassed and haggled Oikawa, begging or forcing him to go to Shiratorizawa. All that is baseless fanon bullshit. There’s literally no canon evidence suggesting that Ushijima even thinks about Oikawa outside of volleyball competitions.

I’ll admit that Ushijima did tell Oikawa, “You chose the wrong path.” and that did cross the line. That does not, however, automatically make him a creepy, overbearing, obsessive stalker. People are allowed to interpret fiction differently (as a literature student I’m more than aware of that). But Ushijima’s words were an act of concern, rather than coercion or violence.

What people need to understand is that Ushijima, while a talented player, is terrible at predicting and understanding the effects his words and actions might have on people. He is a blunt, straightforward and honest person who says what is on his mind. The reason he feels that Oikawa should have gone to Shiratorizawa is because he respects Oikawa’s abilities as a player and sees Oikawa’s potential. His way of showing it might be odd, but it is precisely because he respects Oikawa as an opponent that he questions Oikawa’s choice. To Ushijima, being at Shiratorizawa would allow for Oikawa to fulfil more of his potential (of course, the validity of that belief is questionable considering the treatment of Semi Eita, but that is another argument to consider) He honestly just wanted to warn Oikawa not to “make the same mistake” again without realising that he was basically rubbing salt on Oikawa’s wound + being offensive by telling Oikawa that the decision he’s based the past three years of his life around is wrong, because he genuinely wants to see Oikawa fulfil his potential as a player.

Ushijima’s intentions are not malicious. He respects his opponents despite his thoughts on their abilities (or lack thereof), and when he realises that he’s offended someone he’s quick to apologise (i.e. when Hinata questioned Ushijima calling Seijoh “infertile soil”. Ushijima sweated nervously and apologised for causing offence.) Even Oikawa and Iwaizumi, the two characters who dislike Ushijima the most, acknowledge that “he’s genuinely being sincere” when Ushijima wishes them good luck in their final high school tournament.

Ushijima isn’t the type to deliberately rile up his opponents. He doesn’t look down on them either. Up until Hinata’s appearance in his life, he’s competed against no one but himself mentally. And when Ushijima questions Hinata on being an unskilled and short player? He’s not insulting Hinata for that either! His first impression of Hinata gave him high expectations - a challenge he looked forward to facing, and when he realised Hinata’s abilities were much lower than what he expected, he was genuinely curious, because Hinata had spoken so boldly (about beating HIM, a top 3 ace, and going to nationals) before!

Ushijima states that “baseless self-confidence is something I dislike”, so he certainly does not exhibit that himself. He obviously doesn’t expect someone he acknowledges (Hinata, in case I’m not being clear here) to be arrogant, because in his eyes, an opponent he acknowledges and respects should have a “good” attitude just like his. He does not dislike Hinata himself, but is nonetheless infuriated by Hinata’s “arrogance”, because Ushijima works hard. Yes. Here’s the thing. Contrary to popular belief, Ushijima did not get his accomplishments handed to him on a silver platter. He works hard to become a strong volleyball player. Shiratorizawa’s image of him is “The Super Volleyball Maniac”. He wasn’t just naturally good at it. He spent time and effort practising and improving his skills, just like all the other hardworking characters (Oikawa Tooru) you worship.

Remember that Ushijima does not have the luxury of viewing the events of the manga (or anime) from an outsider’s perspective. He does not know of Hinata Shouyou and his struggles. All Ushijima knows about Hinata is that 1) The boy showed him up at Shiratorizawa and proclaimed that Karasuno would defeat Shiratorizawa and go to nationals and 2) Hinata Shouyou does not exhibit the skills necessarily to back up that statement. Ushijima literally has no idea that Hinata had no proper volleyball team or training up until last year, so it’s entirely within his rights to be annoyed that someone with such crappy skills (which Ushijima would attribute to slacking off/not working hard enough) would claim that winning against Shiratorizawa was so easy. He could’ve been nicer about it, but hey, he wasn’t that hostile to Hinata off the court, as you can see with the training camp arc. At the end of the match he acknowledged Hinata’s abilities as a player. Then in the manga, he (and Tendou) was shocked that his coach did not see Hinata as a worthy player to invite to the Miyagi First Year Training Camp, and he encouraged Hinata to keep working hard, “What are you doing standing there?”

Obviously, people are allowed to dislike characters, and Ushijima has done/said things to grate on people’s nerves (as a Seijoh stan and Iwaizumi lover, his “infertile soil” comments do irk me at times). Nonetheless, your personal feelings towards him do not indicate that he is as bad person (especially not a stalker or a rapist, gosh) canonically.

2

My shitty drawing skills. XD I brought you some Aruani and Eremika fanarts! :3 I give a little explanation as well: Armin and Annie are dating and they are having fun taking a walk together. 

Eren on the other hand is trying to confess Mikasa, but he had never been the man of words, yet without saying the exact thing, Mikasa could find out what he was babbling about and that is why she has a somewhat scared expression (she nearly cries, then she actually will… tears of joy and happiness *sobs*)

14th February is coming soon so I felt an urge to do this. :3 (I’m planning on drawing my other otp’s like this as well. :3)