but ... damn

I had a super rauchy dream last night about Chris Pratt (who I’ve never had a sex dream about before, ever).

Except it was a whole big production: we met and I was awkward, and then we became friends because we had to work together, and then we were flirting, and then he was like “just friends don’t flirt like this,” and I said “yeah you’re right,” and he was like “are we doing this then?” and I was like “uhh yes.”

And then. The raunch began.

I spent an entire day on this all because my best friend asked me if I could. Let’s just say determination is one a hell of a drug. 

Here’s the song I never want to hear again.

Growing stronger

Lance : Jeez, get a room you two!
Pidge : Jelly much Lance?
Lance:Wha- No i’m not!
Keith : Yeah, definitely jelly.

I’m sooo in a kidge mood today, still can’t get over that interview ;-;
and i like Keith in ponytail ~

I had a revelation recently, (which I kind of already knew but this kind of cemented it in my head) which is that Americans actually think THEY are the progressive, open minded ones.

For example, Tom Holland (new Spider-Man) recently did a drag performance of Umbrella on that lip sync show thing (which I would thoroughly recommend watching, he was fucking fantastic) and while some people were like “ew, that’s weird and I’m uncomfortable,” the other half were like “this is so groundbreaking! Spider-Man in drag! He must have SUCH confidence in his masculinity to do something like that at 20 years old! I wonder if he’s gay? He must at least be bi!” Meanwhile anyone I talked to in Britain was like “yeah it was a good performance. Seems like a nice guy.” Because it WASN’T groundbreaking. I didn’t think so, anyway. Tom Holland said “yeah I didn’t mind being in drag, I asked to do it” and took it completely casually, didn’t even think twice about it, because what British actor HASN’T done drag? 

We have a culture over here of men dressed as women in pantomimes every year, and these are things AIMED at children, not deemed inappropriate for them, and the men in question are never thought to be gay or trying to be a woman or whatever. They’re just being funny and having a good time. In my town there’s a local farmer who does the panto every year, as a woman, wig and make up and all, and he’s the beefiest most masculine guy you’ll meet with a wife and kids. He just likes the theatre of it. 

In Mrs Brown’s Boys (probably the most successful Irish sitcom), Mrs Brown is played by a male comedian, Brendan Carroll. His wife and children are also in the show. The fact that he was dressed as a woman was never the joke in the show, or even referenced - he just wrote a funny character and then decided “I’m going to play her.” If you didn’t know already you probably couldn’t even tell from watching that Mrs Brown was a man. I’ve never heard anybody over here have a problem with that. It just.. is. The joke is in her being a foul mouthed old lady who tells filthy jokes, not the part where she’s played by a man. 

When Queen first released “I want to break free” the video (which featured the whole band in drag as housewives) wasn’t allowed to be released in America because they deemed it too risqué and it wasn’t received well. Over here we just thought it was entertaining. We thought nothing of it really. Half the guys in my class when I was at school dressed as women at some point for a laugh. And it was only after speaking to Americans I realised that that just isn’t done over there. We had guys do drag for talent shows in secondary school, and plays in primary school. Everyone thought they were great. Guys from the rugby team went to prom in dresses and their girlfriends went in suits for the hell of it. The principal dressed as a woman on our last day as a joke. But a teenage boy doing drag at school for whatever reason in America is social suicide. I mean, obviously some people in Britain wouldn’t be as accepting of that, and some parts of America are more accepting than others, it’s a massive country, but overall it’s just such a different culture. I think that’s partially why the really liberal, “progressive” ones make such a massive deal about gender roles, and why anyone who dresses as the opposite sex is deemed trans or gay or “queer” - because while they like to think they’re ahead of the game in terms of gender, they still have the mindset that if you wear a dress, you must want to be a woman. (Learned all this while living there btw, I’m not just making assumptions.) 

It irritates me when I then see Americans claiming they are the pinnacle of open-mindedness, and British people are old fashioned fuddy duddies when we see THEM as the conservative ones. It’s kind of funny. I don’t think this counts as generalising so much as comparing two very different cultures. And there are definitely British people who are conservative in other ways, but the whole culture around drag is just different here. I’m very sorry for making you read such a long load of shite mags, I just started typing stream of consciousness style into the submission box and didn’t intend for it to be so long. I suppose it’s just interesting how we view ourselves and our culture, and how others might disagree with that from the outside. I wonder what we’ve got wrong about ourselves, lol.

– anonymous submission



This has put into words exactly how I’ve been feeling for a long time about so many posts and claims and news articles that have come out of the US, but I just hadn’t put it into context. I had no idea why they were so obsessed with something so blatantly ordinary and fine, and you writing all this out, it’s finally clicked in my head.

I mean, we have our Conservatives, but they’re probably more similar to the Democrats in the US in a lot of ways. They were the ones that made the final push to get same-sex marriage legalised here, after all – credit where credit is due.

This is incredibly insightful, and I think that both Brits and Americans would find this fascinating, so thank you so much for taking the time to write it and send it to me. I really, really appreciate it.