burning mill

9

9 Highest Paid Male Supermodels

Sean O’Pry (July 5, 1989) $1.5M

David Gandy (February 19, 1980) $1.4M

Simon Nessman (November 5, 1989) $1.1M

Arthur Kulkov (August 20, 1983) $905K

Noah Mills (April 26, 1985) $740K

Ryan Burns (September 8, 1992) $610K

Tyson Ballou (November 14, 1976) $425K

Ollie Edwards (June 22, 1985) $410K

Jon Kortajarena (May 19, 1985) $290K

some fae facts from lore (pt 2)

pt 1 here

  • iron, salt, and bread (any kind) will ward fae away. so will rowan and hazel.
  • rowan and iron will ward most bad things away, actually.

  • ringing church bells at dawn and dusk will drive fae and/or changelings from your village.

  • alternately, cream and butter and cakes (not bread!!) will attract them.

  • they have many names. fair folk, the good people, the gentry, the wee folk. my favorite is the good neighbors

  • there are places where the veil between worlds is thinner, and these places see more fae. ireland is said to be one. transient places (crossroads and bus stops etc.) are said to be another.

  • musicians are often taken to their world. they may come back but they won’t be the same.

  • adder stones (also called hag stones, witch stones, snake eggs, adderstanes) can reveal fairy or witch traps if seen through the hole in the stone. you can’t trick an adder stone.

  • the fae are highly sexed. orgies are common.

  • random body pains were attributed to the fae. this was called elf shot.

  • tangled hair in the morning was also considered their fault. this was called elf locks.

  • consumption (tuberculosis) was attributed to the fae as well, for forcing young men and women to dance all night.

  • basically if you were sick and there was no cure, blame the fae.

  • alchemists sometimes called on certain fae to assist them. no word on how well this worked out for them.

  • millers were thought to be ‘no canny,’ which means in league with the fae, owing to their ability to control elements. (fire in the kiln, water for the burn, wind for the mill, general control of machinery.)

  • if you know a fae’s true name, you can summon them at any time to do your bidding. but this is a double edged  sword. if they learn your true name, they enslave you right back, and the things they do would be far worse than anything you could think of.

  • some myths have lesser fae paying a tithe (a tiende) to their royals. some myths have them paying this tithe directly to hell.

  • mortal midwives were sometimes summoned to the fae realm to assist in the birth of another kidnapped mortal woman. they sometimes offer an ointment for use on the baby. if the midwife uses it herself, she will gain fae sight.

  • lesser fae can die or be killed. to witness one of these funerals is bad omen.

People: “My New Years resolution is to loose weight!” “Mine is to become fit!” “What is your New Years resolution?”

Me: to convince the writers of supernatural to have Dean Winchester admit his love for Castiel to the world and everyone else is like “jeez took you long enough” and to binge watch all 11 ½ seasons in a week.

People: Come on be realistic…

Me: Look who’s talking. *walks out*

Fae Facts - Refactored

So I caught wind of a discussion of “Fae facts” that were listed on the web, and what was true and what was not on it, and I’ve decided to write an article about it from the fae perspective…

‘Fae’ range from anything like goblins and imps to the little pixies with the wings that everyone associated with fairies to the seven-foot tall members of the royal courts. some even consider the banshee to be fae. (also trolls, gnomes, elves, djinn, dwarves, leprechauns, will-o-wisps, etc.)

  • Partially true.  There are actually many more fae than mortals can imagine.  There are fae unicorns (though not all unicorns are fae), merfolk are fae, there are some mortal species that can become partially fae (like changelings) and there are fae that no mortal has ever even heard of.  Additionally other cultures have fae under other names and courts, such as yokai, spirits (tho not all spirits are fae), and others.  Fae exist all over the world, in different cultures, with different names, and often their own Courts.

Some think the fae are evil, some think they are fallen angels, but most are considered to be a chaotic neutral force. some might call this ‘whimsically evil.’

  • False.   Angels/Demons and fae are not related.   We generally come from nature or Faerie, and the angels and demons are created directly by a divine being for a purpose.  Also our ‘alignments’ are all over the map, just like mortals.

Honey makes them drunk.

  • Mostly False.  Honey is the base for honey mead.   Honey mead is the base for Faerie wine.  Honey has more of an ‘effect on us’, but it doesn’t generally make us drunk.   We however do make the Best Wine fron it.  

Iron poisons them, as it does many magical beings.

  • True.  Almost all the fae I know have some reaction to iron.

Some were-creatures were probably just fae in disguise, since fae can assume any form.

  • Somewhat true.  Not all fae can shapeshift, but some were-creatures are fae.  Not all fae that can shapeshift can take any form, but some can.  I can’t take the form of a human (at least as fae), and the number of animals I can turn into… well that’s not unlimited either, but it is alot.   Also fae shapeshifters usually have a base form that they prefer.  Sometimes that is called their ‘sleeping form’ because some can’t maintain it when they sleep.

They sometimes lure humans with music that makes them want to follow and dance. They have to dance for what feels like a year and a day but it’s actually only seconds.

  • False.  This is the other way around, please see my article on faerie rings.  If you enter a faerie ring, and dance for a day, when you exit (on average) a year will have passed.   If you have danced with the fae in one of these rings for a year and a day, don’t return to Earth as you’re already dead there.

True names of the fae have power over them. they often use aliases when dealing with non-fae.

  • True.  

Some people are gifted with fae sight, which allows them to see the fae and also sometimes peeks into the future through their dreams.

  • Partially true.   Except that those people who have ‘fae sight’ are usually partially fae themselves.   Also it gives no insight into the future.  However they are easily able to travel to Faerie in their dreams.

Cats hate the fae, and the fae hate them back.

  • False.  Some fae ride cats around.   Some fae become cats, particularly when they want to become a witches’ familiar.  Pixies have the most trouble with cats, because cats think they are moths and chase them around. But in general, the cats just want to play, and are not hated by pixies for this.

Iron horseshoes over the door can act as a fae deterrent.

  • Partially true.  Also other things can deter fae, like salt.   Why would you want to do this?

They sometimes kidnap human children and leave their own children or elderly behind. these are called changelings.

  • True.  It still happens today.   Additionally some fae end up incarnated into mortal bodies, by choice, obligation or force.  These are also considered changelings.  In a society that denies fae exist for the most part, those changelings may not know about their true nature right away.  Changelings and faekin are functionally similar.

Fae are generous with gifts, especially for polite people, but prefer gifts in return.

  • True.  But should this be considered unusual?

That being said, better to avoid accepting gifts.  You probably don’t have enough to pay them back. By saying ‘thank you,’ you acknowledge that a gift was given and that you now owe something in return.  Being indebted to the fae = bad time.

  • Partially true.   Often mortals do not understand the value of what is given.  It will help, if you are going to ask a fae for something, to have the payment already in hand.   Then we will know how much of it you want in advance.

Fae can’t lie, but truth and honesty aren’t always the same.

  • Partially false.  Fae can lie, we usually won’t.  Not only are lies draining to maintain, but why would we bother?  I don’t lie.

Asking for a favor will cause offense. Make it seem like it’s their idea to help you.

  • Partially true.  Don’t just come to us to ask for favors all the time, what would you think about another mortal that did this?

Most things offend them, actually.

  • Mostly untrue, although the idea that mortals think everything offends us, is offensive…

Some fae can smell a lie. there’s no way of knowing which ones unless they tell you.

  • True.   Actually most of us can tell when we’re being lied to.  But again is this unusual?

Fae use ‘glamour’ to hide their appearance or habitations around humans. ‘Glamour’ can be gifted for use by humans.

  • True.   Also you all can learn glamour on your own if you put some effort into it.

It’s better for fae to have half-breed children than no children at all, so relationships with humans are fine. It just rarely works out fine for the human.

  • Partially true.  There are plenty of fae changelings in the mortal realm, even today.  But there is very little reason it can’t work out fine for mortals to have these children.  

Iron, salt, and bread (any kind) will ward fae away. so will rowan and hazel.

  • Partially true.  Iron, yes; Salt, conditionally yes; Bread, no; Rowan, yes;  Hazel, no.

Rowan and iron will ward most bad things away, actually.

  • And I guess good things too.   I don’t like where some of these facts are going.

Ringing church bells at dawn and dusk will drive fae and/or changelings from your village.

  • Mostly false.  Though most of us aren’t a big fan of churches.

Alternately, cream and butter and cakes (not bread!!) will attract them.

  • ? … Well I like cream and butter and cakes.   There’s nothing wrong with bread.   What were people putting in their bread back in the old days?

They have many names. fair folk, the good people, the gentry, the wee folk. my favorite is the good neighbors.

  • True.  And even more names than that.   Humans have 1100 distinct languages and a word for us in most of them.

There are places where the veil between worlds is thinner, and these places see more fae. Ireland is said to be one. transient places (crossroads and bus stops etc.) are said to be another.

  • True.  Also see ‘liminal spaces’.

Musicians are often taken to their world. they may come back but they won’t be the same.

  • Partially true.  Sometimes mortals wander into our world, attracted to what we’re doing.  Sometimes musicians hear the music and come.   If you come to Faerie long enough, you’ll become fae.  It can’t be helped.   But there’s really no discrimination.

Adder stones (also called hag stones, witch stones, snake eggs, adderstanes) can reveal fairy or witch traps if seen through the hole in the stone. You can’t trick an adder stone.

  • Probably true.  Though this presumes the fae and witches set traps for humans in the first place…

The fae are highly sexed. Orgies are common.

  • Mostly true.  There are exceptions as always.  The fae tend to love first and ask questions later.  We can fall in love immediately with someone with a spirit that attracts us.   We don’t need your ‘spin-up’ time.

Random body pains were attributed to the fae. this was called elf shot.

  • Mostly false.  Random body pains can be attributed to any type of magick, energetic or psionic attack.  Check your shields.

Tangled hair in the morning was also considered their fault. this was called elf locks.

  • Usually false.  Though pixies playing in your hair at night is not unheard of.

Consumption (tuberculosis) was attributed to the fae as well, for forcing young men and women to dance all night.

  • False.  I think this goes without saying.

Basically if you were sick and there was no cure, blame the fae.

  • LOL.  Mortals blame everything on everything but themselves…

Alchemists sometimes called on certain fae to assist them. No word on how well this worked out for them.

  • True.  So do witches.  So do other types of magick practitioners.  Sometimes we even teach things.  It worked out well for most.  It depends on whether you want to learn our arts or just depend on us to do our arts for you.  Don’t be lazy.

Millers were thought to be ‘no canny,’ which means in league with the fae, owing to their ability to control elements. (fire in the kiln, water for the burn, wind for the mill, general control of machinery)

  • Mostly true.   Except any practitioner of any trade can have a relationship with the fae in their work.  The closer to nature you work, however, the more you can expect the fae to be involved.

If you know a fae’s true name, you can summon them at any time to do your bidding. But this is a double edged sword. If they learn your true name, they enslave you right back, and the things they do would be far worse than anything you could think of.

  • Partially true.   No right-minded fae is going to give you their true name.  If you find it out, however, and never abuse that power, no harm no foul.   If you begin to abuse it, though, then it’s only prudent to learn yours and get you to stop.  Most of the people who have formed the foundation of this ‘fact’ abused a fae’s name.

Some myths have lesser fae paying a tithe (a tiende) to their royals. Some myths have them paying this tithe directly to hell.

  • Partially true. Some Courts have taxes. I mean, castles don’t defend themselves and if courts don’t have reasonable resources to solve the Big Problems then the Court doesn’t really work.  This being said, we bear no association with the mortal concept of Heaven or Hell and we certainly do not send energy or mammon to their leadership.

Mortal midwives were sometimes summoned to the fae realm to assist in the birth of another kidnapped mortal woman.  They sometimes offer an ointment for use on the baby. if the midwife uses it herself, she will gain fae sight.

  • Partially true.  She will become partially fae.   Hopefully that’s what she was going for. If you’re going to do this, at least split it between you and the baby.   Why would you want to hurt the baby?

Lesser fae can die or be killed.  To witness one of these funerals is bad omen.

  • Partially true.  Its pretty hard to truly kill a ‘lesser fae’.  Even changelings spirits will return to Faerie.  It’s not impossible though.  If you’re witnessing one of these funerals, you’re probably already fae.  Take that as you will.

Credit and references are given to the following sites for being the source of this list:

https://faerielore.tumblr.com/post/162470095402/starbiter-some-fae-facts-from-lore-pt-2-pt-1

http://starbiter.tumblr.com/post/157281741328/some-fae-facts-from-lore-fae-range-from-anything

~ @alynnafoxie

—> Have questions? Send them to us at SpiritFAQ!

7

Tina: You think I haven’t been around the world? I’ve been everywhere, darling. I’m a very wealthy woman. My husband’s kept me in the finest clothes from Bergdorf Goodman, you see. 
Gnarlak: Aurors! Freeze!
Tina: No! Leave me alone!
Gnarlak: Hands in the air!
Tina: I didn’t kill anyone! And I didn’t burn down the mill either! My sister did! But now she’s been eaten by wolves!

(Parks and Recreation; season 3, episode 3: The Fight) 

Sherman’s Engineers Tear Up A Length Of Track In Atlanta  

“The excitement, the exhilaration, ay the rapture, created by this arrival will never be forgotten,” a naval officer wrote. The end of the war seemed in sight.

In the scouts’ wake lay a broad zone of destruction carved through the heart of Georgia all the way back to Atlanta, 250 miles away.

It was a trail of burned mills and railroad stations, emptied barns and corn cribs, ransacked homes and vacant chicken coops.

There were charred bridges, burned courthouses and dead slave-hunting dogs killed by Northern soldiers.

There were miles of ripped-up railroad, with the ties incinerated and the rails bent around trees to prevent them from being used again.

(Library of Congress)/ https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/gen-william-t-sherman-the-restless-warrior-who-led-the-march-to-the-sea/2014/09/11/ba165c9a-32b1-11e4-9e92-0899b306bbea_story.html?utm_term=.8b38bf7725be

My thoughts on Taishi Touma

Okay, so I decided to talk about Touma because it seems to me a lot of people want to burn him at the stake. 

People like Touma exist, and you might meet them, or maybe you know one already. It pays to understand more so you don’t shoot them in the head or something and become a criminal.  

 I will put the rest under the cut, because there are spoilers.

Keep reading

  • Ichabod: There is some good inside Henry!
  • Henry: *steals Irving's soul*
  • Henry: *turns Joe Corbin into a wendigo*
  • Henry: *buries Ichabod alive*
  • Henry: *condemns Abbie to purgatory*
  • Henry: *causes multiple malicious acts of mayhem*
  • Henry: *tries to kill Katrina*
  • Henry: *tries to kill Katrina some more*
  • Henry: *wants Katrina so dead*
  • Ichabod: ... Totally redeemable!
  • Abbie: You know for such a smart person, you are so fucking stupid
Rhody Tales, Pt. 1

Fandom: OMG, Check Please

Characters: Jack Zimmermann, OCs that may or may not be based on actual people

Notes: Almost all of the information about Woonsocket is correct. I fact-checked everything myself. Autumnfest and the OLQM festival are both real, as is the mill fire. Dynamite is the best sandwich in the world. Nap Lajoie is real and was actually from Woonsocket, among other baseball players that didn’t get as famous. Mathieu Schneider is not from Woonsocket originally, but since he played for Mount St Charles I guess they claim him as one of their own. And yes, Mount does hold the record for most consecutive state titles. I’m gonna get to that in another part. Two other NHL players are from Woonsocket as well. The Dunk refers to the Dunkin’ Donuts Center, where the AHL team the Providence Bruins plays. 

@asexualdex I finally finished part 1. 


Jack paused outside his apartment building, staring up at the Dunk. It was still a weird experience seeing himself on the side of the building. It’s not that Samwell didn’t promote their hockey team, but the posters on the outside of Faber didn’t face Rt 146, where hundreds of thousands of people drove past hundred foot tall posters of Jack and the rest of the Falcs. Today, the southbound side of 146 was jammed with people trying to get to the beach. It was only 7:30am, but they day promised to be a scorcher. Who knew it would get so warm in Rhode Island in late July. Of course, Jack thought to himself as he stepped into the air conditioned lobby, Bittle would tell him this was nothing, Georgia summers were hot and humid, not a great combination.

Jack’s phone dinged on the counter. He reluctantly turned away from his laptop, one of his former professors sent him a really interesting article about some new historical locations opening in Massachusetts.

‘Good morning, honey!’ Jack smiled when he saw the text from Bitty, nearly forgetting the article. ‘I was looking for some bakeries to try the next time I visit, and I found something you would really be interested in!’ At the end of the text was a hyperlink. Jack clicked through, expecting a similar article to the one he had just been reading. He scanned the article, freezing on the words “French-Canadian”. A sudden pang of homesickness hit Jack, which surprised him. He was used to living away from home, but there was still a part of him that remembered being 10 years old, playing hockey with the neighborhood kids on the pond, their parents yelling encouragement in French. Jack scrolled back up and read the article again. He opened another web tab on his phone and searched Google for a few minuted. Writing down an address, he dialed a familiar number.

“Hey, Georgia. Can I borrow your car? There’s something I need to do today…”

Jack followed the directions of the GPS, travelling up 146. Eventually, he started to see exit signs for the city he was trying to reach. He passed through an intersection, the GPS telling him he was 10 minutes from his destination. He stayed in the far right lane, passing stores and such lining the highway. Finally, Jack crested the hill overlooking Park Square, Woonsocket. Directly in front of him, a church took up most of the block. Amusement park rides were being set up on the grassy area of the church, and brightly colored booths took up parking lot space. To his right, an old-fashioned candy shop advertising maple butter and other treats backed a strip mall, and to his left the parking lot of a grocery store was jammed packed. Jack didn’t realize he missed his turn until the GPS said “recalculating”. Luckily, it found an alternate route for him to take.

Jack turned right onto Providence Street, passing a small baseball field. A bunch of kids were playing on the field, not really an organized game, but pickup baseball. He followed Providence Street until the end, admiring the older Colonial houses.

“Must’ve been built during the early mill years,” Jack spoke aloud to himself. He turned right onto South Main Street, admiring the Baptist church. He finally entered Market Square, the dam on his left and the river flowing on his right. Most of the buildings looked original. Jack missed the entrance to the parking lot of the Museum of Work and Culture, so he followed traffic around the square. He managed to make his way to Main Street, admiring the original mill buildings. One caught his eye, and Jack quickly pulled into the parking lot next to the building. He stared up at the giant mural painted in the side of the building, large lettering reading “Bienvenue à Woonsocket, The French Quarter”. Jack couldn’t quite identify the emotions welling up inside him. It was part homesickness, part the feeling that he found home, and part something else. He was frozen in place, standing outside Georgia’s car, traffic passing by on Main St. Jack finally unfroze and pulled his phone out of his pocket. He took a picture of the mural, telling himself he would send it to his dad and Bits later on.

“Welcome to the Museum of Work and Culture,” An teenager greeted Jack at the information desk. “How can I help you today?”

“Uh, one adult ticket please,” He answered. The teenager processed his request.

“Are you visiting from Québec?” The girl asked him, taking his money and making change. She noticed the surprised look on his face. “My grandfather is from Québec, your accent reminded me of his,” She explained, handing Jack his ticket and change.

“Visiting, but not from Québec,” Jack said. “I play hockey in Providence.”

Recognition dawned on the teenagers face. “You play for the Falconers.”

“Uh, yes,” Jack answered. “Jack Zimmermann, right wing.”

“Lynne Gervais. My family are huge fans of yours and the Falcs,” The teenager introduced herself. Jack tried not to blush.

“Thank you. It’s always great to meet fans,” He answered. “Do you mind if I…?” He pointed into the museum.

“Of course,” Lynne answered. “Go on in. There’s maps by the door, if you’d like.” Jack nodded his thanks and entered the museum, picking up a map as he passed by.

Jack paused between exhibits, studying the map.

“Bonjour, Monsieur Zimmermann,” Someone spoke to Jack’s right. He looked up to see an older man standing there, with a nametag that identified him as Adrien Nadeau, tour guide.

“Bonjour, Monsieur Nadeau,” Jack shook the man’s hand. He was surprised they were almost eye level.  

“Enjoying the museum?” Adrien asked.

“Very much,” Jack answered. “I never knew there was a French-Canadian city in Rhode Island.”

Adrien laughed, commenting, “It’s a well kept secret. Here, let me show you around.” Jack followed the older man through the museum, to an exhibit hall with sports memorabilia and photos. Jack did a double take when he saw one of the hockey jerseys mounted on the wall. The jersey itself was red, with a blue stripe bounded by white stripes running through the middle. On the blue stripe was stitched an interlocking M, St, and C. The jersey reminded Jack almost of the Montreal Canadiens jersey his father wore for years.

“That’s a jersey from the 1985 Mount Saint Charles hockey team. Mount swept the high school division for hockey, recording 26 consecutive state titles. Plenty of those boys went pro, too. Still the best hockey program in the state,” Adrien explained to Jack. He pointed to a team picture, high school boys and their coaches surrounding a banner proclaiming Mount St. Charles the 1985 State Champions. “That’s Mathieu Schneider. Got drafted by the Canadiens two years after this picture was taken. Played for them for a few months before they sent him back to his juniors team. Ended up getting pulled back up and won the Cup with them in 1993.” Jack stared at the picture, trying to remember if Bob had ever told him about Schneider. “Of course,” Adrien pulled Jack’s attention to a photograph on the other side of the room. “Most baseball fans know Nap Lajoie, only Woonsocket resident to make it into the Baseball Hall of Fame.” Jack studied the picture of Nap, recognizing the French-Canadian features.

“You’re first generation, correct?” Jack asked Adrien. The older man nodded.

“My parents brought me and my brothers here when I was 10. My father’s grandparents moved here when they got married, but his parents moved back to Canada. When industry in Woonsocket boomed during World War Two, my parents moved back here for a few years. My father served overseas, in Italy, and my mother worked in the mills,” Adrien led Jack to another section of the museum, pointing to a picture of a mill building. “After the war, they had some business to wrap up in Canada, which is when I was born. Then we moved back here. My father worked as a photographer for the Woonsocket Call until he retired.” Adrien stared at the photograph, lost in thought. Jack the read the description. ‘Alice Mill, located on First Street. Established 1901, closed 2001.’

“Is this the mill your mother worked in?” He asked Adrien.

“Yep. The mill dyed cloth, some of it went on to supply the soldiers fighting the war, some of it stayed local.” Adrien moved to another photograph. “Unfortunately, the mill burned down in 2012. It was one of the biggest mill fires in the area, the smoke plume could be seen for miles.” Adrien shook his head, turning away from the dramatic photo. “Here, I’ll show you some of the better Woonsocket traditions.”

“On Main Street, there’s a mural. How much of Woonsocket is the French Quarter?” Jack asked, following Adrien back towards the front of the museum.

Adrien laughed. “Officially, the downtown area has been known as the French Quarter since the city was founded. But most of the city is French-Canadian, mostly third and fourth generation now. There’s a group of us first and second generation people that meet once in awhile and reminisce about the old days.” He stopped in front of a series of photographs, clearly showing the same setting in different time periods. “The city started Autumnfest in 1979. It happens every Columbus Day Weekend, and, if you ask me, it’s the best weekend of the year. No better place to get dynamite.” Jack broke away from one of the newer photos to stare incredulously at Adrien. The older man burst out laughing. “Calm down, Jacques. I’m not talking about the explosive. Dynamite is a sandwich, hamburger cooked with peppers and onions and red pepper, served in a torpedo roll. Strictly Woonsocket French-Canadian, and every family has their own recipe.”

“I passed a church setting up for a festival on the way in. Was that in Woonsocket or no?” Jack asked, wandering around the room to look at other pictures from Autumnfests past.

“Out in Park Square? That’s Our Lady, Queen of Martyrs. They have a summer festival every year, this year is their 60th anniversary.” Adrien answered. The two walked back out to the front, where Lynne was still tending the information desk. Adrien retrieved a piece of paper from the desk and wrote something down, then walked back over to Jack. The hockey player’s head was spinning, he’d learned so much about the small city in one day.

“Here’s my phone number and email. Call me sometime and come to one of the meetings of the old folks. Some of them have stories from before I lived in the city, they know it better than I do,” Adrien offered Jack the piece of paper. “And you’re always welcome back here, tell ‘em you know Adrien Nadeau and they’ll give you the VIP treatment.” Jack laughed.

“Thank you so much, Adrien. It’s been an honor getting a tour from you.” The two men shook hands again, and Jack left the building. He crossed the square and stood at the side of the dam. He pulled his phone out of his pocket, sending Bitty a text with the picture of the mural, then dialing his dad’s number. He heard the line ring for a few moments before Bob picked up.

“Hey, Dad. Did you ever play with a guy named Mathieu Schneider? He’s from this little French-Canadian city in Rhode Island named Woonsocket…..”

I don’t know who of my SQ followers have watched The Nanny, but there were 6 long painful years in that show of Fran and Max dating other people, whilst they were fully aware they were in love with each other. 6 years before it became canon, even though it always was. 6 years of dancing around the truth. Fran was even engaged to someone else at one point. But the point is that they admitted it. They admitted that they’d always been in love and they got married. It took years. But it happened. So please never lose hope in SwanQueen because it’s been so long and they’re going in different directions with different partners. That means nothing. This may very well be the slow burn of the century. This may all have been worth it. So let’s wait it out.

Speaking of Hamilton near-death experiences, he was once on a raid to burn flour mills in PA with “Light-Horse Harry” Lee when they were surprised by a party of British Dragoons.  Lee and his men fled on horseback while Hamilton and his men jumped on a boat to try to make it down the river.  Lee watched as the British strafed the boat with carbines, killing one man and forcing the others to jump into the river, whose current was unusually strong.  He wrote off a dispatch sadly informing Washington of Col. Hamilton’s death in battle, but shortly after the dispatch arrived at Washington’s HQ who should show up but the “deceased,” still dripping wet but distinctly alive.