burkina-Faso

Ancient settlements in Burkina Faso shed light on the secrets of the Kurumba people

Polish archaeologists working in northern Burkina Faso have uncovered traces of some of the most ancient settlements ever found to date in the region. They now plan to study the mysterious Kurumba community that lives in the area, hoping to uncover the secrets of when its first people established themselves in Burkina Faso.

The project, led by scientists from the universities of Krakow and Warsaw, began last October, with the aim of improving scientific knowledge of a country that is often ignored by archaeologists. The team focused on the northern department of Pobé-Mengao, where many Kurumba people live.

Krzysztof Rak from the Institute of Archaeology of the Jagiellonian University in Kraków said: “Burkina Faso remains a blank spot on the archaeological map of Africa − so far only random excavations have been carried out here. The research project we have started may shed new light on the history of this country since the beginning of human presence in this place,” as reported by the Polish Press Agency. Read more.

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Deadly Mali hotel attack: ‘They were shooting at anything that moved’

(CNN)Gunmen who raided a Malian hotel shouted “Allahu akbar” as they sprayed bullets on tables of people who were gathered for breakfast, a witness said.

The attackers did not say a word to anyone as they opened fire Friday morning, employee Tamba Couye said.

They shot at “anything that moved” as terrified patrons dashed for cover all over the hotel, he said.

By the time Malian and U.N. security forces rushed in and ended the siege hours later, bodies were scattered across the floors of the Radisson Blu Hotel in Bamako.

At least 19 people were killed in the attack, said Olivier Salgado, a spokesman for the U.N. mission in the nation.


Interesting to see how the media seemed to pay a little more attention than usual on this attack, but not because some Malians were either killed or injured. It was because one of the first Mali attack victim was an American and also some foreigners were either killed or held hostage.

#ThemediadidagoodjobaboutjustfocusingontheAmericanlifelost

#Thereisabiggerpicturethatthemediaispretendingnottosee

#Onlycertainlivesmattertothem

#blacklivesmatter

#wehavetodobetter

Please pray for Mali and and not just for one life that was lost, but for all the lives that were lost in such a horrendous attack! This is our Africa. Please repost, reblog, post,  and let your voices be heard. 

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Hundreds of protesters placed brooms on the grave of former Burkina Faso leader Thomas Sankara on Sunday in a symbolic demand for justice for the murdered revolutionary hero.

Sankara was killed in a 1987 French-backed military coup, which brought his rival and French puppet Blaise Compaore to power. Compaore – Sankara’s former comrade-turned-rival, who seized power in the coup – has long been implicated in the assassination.

Following Compaore’s ouster in October, calls for justice have mounted, with the revolutionary hero’s widow, Mariam Sankara, telling reporters last month that she hoped the fall of the former French-backed dictator would pave the way for an investigation into his death.

On Sunday, protesters gathered at the Dagnoen cemetery, east of the capital Ouagadougou, demanding a closure into one of Africa’s most controversial political assassinations.

“The broom has a symbolic meaning for some ethic groups, asking the dead person to point out who killed them,” said the artist Smockey, one of the founders of “Balai Citoyen” (Citizen’s Broom) group, which helped organise the protests that led to Compaore’s downfall.

“It’s an appeal for the reopening of the Sankara case,” he added.

“We succeeded in winning a first step towards victory (with the fall of Compaore). Now we are at the second step — for justice. The third will be the rehabilitation (of Sankara) and the spreading of his ideas,” Smockey told some 300 people gathered around the grave of Sankara and 12 of his comrades killed in the coup.
A pan-Africanist revolutionary, Sankara transformed what was then the former French colony of Upper Volta into Burkina Faso, or, the “Land of the Upright Men”. His spirit loomed large during the recent anti-Compaore protests.

Twenty-seven years after his murder, the circumstances around his death – especially as to who exactly killed him and who ordered it – remains a mystery.

As Sankara’s stature as a legendary figure grew across the continent, with fans adopting his signature red beret and protesters across Africa waving his photograph, the mystery and intrigue behind Sankara’s assassination has only increased.

Interim president Michel Kafando, who took over from Compaore after torturous talks between the military and civilian leaders, promised to investigate whether the remains in the grave were actually those of Sankara. His family have been asking in vain since 1997 for an investigation amid claims that the corpse buried there was not his.

The Sankara case “will be entirely reopened and justice will be done”, Kafando said in early December.

Many in the crowd at the Dagnoen cemetery, including political leaders, demanded that the authorities turn their words into deeds.

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