burke

Hegemony of murderers

The West still doesn’t understand the evils that haunts mankind since the emergence of modern ideologies. Although Burke criticised the development in France during the Revolution, we never learned the lessons he wished to teach us. Instead we replaced his wisdom with forgetfulness of the worst atrocities ever faced by mankind.

In the early hours of 17 July, 1918, the Romanov family, three servants and their doctor were herded down into the cellar of the Ipatiev house in Yekaterinburg. They had been told that they were going to take cover from artillery from the approaching White Army. They put on their clothes and gathered some belongings and the Tsar carried his sickly thirteen-year-old son, Alexei, down the stairs.

They waited in the cellar for a while, before a group of armed men came in and read their sentence. Death. The Tsar was then shot several times in the chest and he fell down dead or dying. For the rest of them the gruesome butchery had just begun. Alexei, Anastasia, Tatiana, Olga and Maria were not killed by the first hail of bullets. Wounded and terrified they cried out in agony before they were executed with bullets, bayonets and the butts of pistols and rifles. One of the murderers recalled that the floor was slippery as ice from brains and blood as they waded in to kill the children. It took 20 minutes before they were all quiet, but as they carried the bodies out it was revealed that two of them were still breathing. The children were then stabbed until dead. The bodies were plundered of valuables and the soldiers cut off the fingers of the Tsaritsa to remove rings. All of them were cut up, put in acid and dumped in a mine shaft and a shallow grave.

Thus ended 300 years of Romanov dynasty. But of course, for Russia, the slaughter had just begun. At least 20 million people were killed by the USSR, and communism as a whole is responsible for killing at least 100 million people. It is the single deadliest ideology in the history of mankind.

The left gets away with murder

Here’s a death toll for communism around the world, according to the Black book of communism:
65 million in the People’s Republic of China
20 million in the Soviet Union
2 million in Cambodia
2 million in North Korea
1.7 million in Ethiopia
1.5 million in Afghanistan
1 million in the Eastern Bloc
1 million in Vietnam
150,000 in Latin America
10,000 deaths “resulting from actions of the international Communist movement and Communist parties not in power.”

The left also has a long history of domestic terrorism in the West. The Red brigades, Red Army Faction, Weather Underground, Symbionese Liberation Army to mention a few. 

Exempt from scrutiny
Unlike followers of revolutionary ideologies on the right, it is quite possible to call yourself a communist without any repercussions in your personal or professional life. It can even help you in your career, especially in Academia. Many famous Swedish people in politics, media, sport, and culture are un-repenting communists. Members of a Marxist-Leninist party even. Many more are just slightly reformed and constantly apologetic, often hiding behind a thin veneer of restraint which is let go as soon as something in society upsets them, and they immediately call for totalitarian and violent measures. The online world has proven a perfect outlet for their urge to purge, as they hound political opponents, engage in mischaracterisation, threats, and calls to violence. Western society has an inexplicable tolerance for these leftist views and ideas, even when it takes violent expressions. 

It’s easy to think this is just something relating to communism or anarchism, but the above examples often come from liberals too. And they also have a history of getting  away with murder. Between 1793 and 1794 the Reign of Terror raged across France. Robespierre and the revolutionaries did what so many revolutionaries would do after them, they killed anyone who they didn’t like. Most famously Robespierre and his thugs killed the aristocracy, but in fact 72% of those executed were peasants and workers who simply disagreed with the regime. In modern day, another example is the Western liberal support of the Arab spring which has been pivotal in crashing the Middle East into yet another violent rampage.

Remains of 20,000 poles murdered by the Soviet Union

We just want change. And kill anyone who opposes it

Revolutionaries kill people. The revolution is in itself almost always responsible for worse atrocities than the regime it seeks to overthrow. Solzjenitsyn claimed that in the 80 years prior to the Russian revolution –  a period where one Tsar was assassinated, there were many assassination attempts (one in my own country, Sweden, in fact), and there were widespread revolutionary movements – only about 17 people a year were executed. The Cheka, however, executed without trial more than a thousand people a month in the first years after 1917. He continues to tell us that if you would average the amount of executed a month up until the height of executions by Stalin in 1937-38, about 40,000 people were killed every month. He rightly wonders how the west could make an alliance with such a horrible regime. How was the Soviet Union better than Nazi Germany? In fact, it wasn’t. 

But the revolutionaries aren’t just to be rejected for their blood lust. If we simply look at the murderous aspect they cannot be understood. The question becomes a simple argument of “how could this happen?”. The really important thing to understand is how mankind can develop and improve society, without destroying itself in the process, and how we can maintain that which serves us even when we have forgotten how it serves us. This is the point of view that Burke argued in the Reflections on the Revolution in France. He meant that the reason that the French Revolution would be so disastrous was that it was founded on abstract concepts that ignored mankind’s complexity, the wisdom which hides within tradition, and the intricacy of human society. It also ignores the weakness of men and our inability to grasp everything, but our willingness to think that we do. Herein lies the hubris of utopian thinking and ideological fight for power of the societies that have grown more organically over the centuries. The left is a living example of the Doning-Kruger effect, if you will. Too stupid to understand that it doesn’t understand. I mentioned the liberal support of the Arab spring previously, and it is a prime example of how overthrowing functioning nation states for abstract ideas can lead to extreme problems. Remembering Burke commenting on the French Revolution, it is easy to see history repeating itself, but this time in the Arab world:

“Can I now congratulate the same nation upon its freedom? Is it because liberty in the abstract may be classed amongst the blessings of mankind, that I am seriously to felicitate a mad-man, who has escaped from the protecting restraint and wholesome darkness of his cell, on his restoration to the enjoyment of light and liberty? Am I to congratulate a highwayman and murderer, who has broke prison, upon the recovery of his natural rights? This would be to act over again the scene of the criminals condemned to the galleys, and their heroic deliverer, the metaphysic knight of the sorrowful countenance.” (Reflections on the French Revolution. The Harvard Classics)

Remember who we are. Or perish.
The alternative to these modernist ideologies is a state based not around an ideology, but around fair and tested principles of law, and a people and their geographical location. In other words a nation state for each people created around the self interest of that people as a whole, and represented by themselves.


We have not yet managed to free ourselves from abstract utopian thinking. And it is important to remember that it is not just the revolution that kills, that is just an eclipse in the blood lust fed by the urge to kill that which does not fit the revolutionary world view. Man has always killed, but when he kills for abstract ideals there is no limit to the extent of the murder. The breech against the abstract idea can occur at any time, in any generation, and in any person. No one is ever safe.

The limits of man’s wisdom should prevent us from any too radical idea. Anything that changes society greatly in too short a time. Today’s Western society is rife with abstract ideas that are said to improve life for mankind. The ideas of globalism, open border, multicultural societies, the dismantling of the family are obvious abstracts that are major changes to our societies, that history repeatedly tells us could lead to disaster. But beyond those things, we will be facing technological advances that are beyond our current field of vision. We are facing these new challenges without having understood anything from the violence of Modernity and the 20th century. I believe that is a reason for concern and potentially the end of mankind.

When I was younger, I always believed that monsters under my bed exist. I have always been afraid of the stories weaved by cousins older and wiser than I was, terrified of the bloodied nails and sharpened teeth. Images of headless men and faceless women in black would make me quiver in fear. I remember crying when they tricked me into entering a dark room and locking me from the outside. I was only six years old – naive, gullible, and afraid.

I was already fifteen when I started sleeping with the lights turned off. 

I learned in class, with the help of Burke, that something sublime can provoke terror. Pain and terror were the strongest of emotions, he says. Ever since then, I always loved the idea of sublime. Six years later, I have been watching movies that speak of horror and fear.

So I ask myself, what if the demon lurking on this earth plays with your fear to attack and pounce on you? What if the ghosts and monsters under your bed are made real by the fear you have in your heart?

Then maybe my monsters are ‘disappointing people around me,’ 'failure,’ and 'never being enough.’ Then maybe the monsters I used to believe in are actually real.

And these monsters exist in the looks of people around me, silently passing the message “this girl will never be like her brother, she’s not even close to his brilliance” and I blink away the fear welling up in my heart. These monsters are the disappointed head shakes I get from the meager achievement I get. These monsters are the bottles of pills I keep hidden in boxes, the very same pills that will define me as dysfunctional. These monsters send me text messages, telling me 'I love you’ only to claw my heart out of my chest. These monsters are the pained smiles of my parents when I tell them I no longer want to leave. These monsters are the people you welcomed into your home, only to have them dirty your shirts and leave without a single good bye. These monsters exists in your very own eyes when all you see is contempt every time you look into the mirror.

They say monsters live under my bed. Years later, I beg to differ.

My monsters exist everywhere, tailing me with every step I take.

—  the personification of fear (inspired by the movie IT)