bureau of land management

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The superbloom has migrated north to California’s Central Valley, and the show is simply indescribable at Carrizo Plain National Monument. The Valley floor has endless expanses of yellows and purples from coreopsis, tidy tips and phacelia, with smaller patches of dozens of other species. Not to be outdone, the Temblor Range is painted with swaths of wildlflowers in oranges yellow and purple like something out of a storybook. Visitors are flocking to the area to see this explosion of color, and travelers should be prepared with a full tank of gas as there are no services in the monument. Photos by Bob Wick, Bureau of Land Management (@mypubliclands).

mashable.com
Interior Dept. agency changes website from family visiting park to a giant pile of coal
Get out and enjoy that giant coal seam this weekend!
By Andrew Freedman

This is ridiculous. Within the past 24 hours, several major national and regional media sources reported that the BLM (Bureau of Land Management) had changed the photo on its home page from this:

To this, showing a seam of coal:

So, the BLM is telling the world that it’s in the business of extraction and making the industries that want to exploit, dig, mine, trash and ruin our public lands rich and richer and richest, and fuck the rest of us.

So, I just went to the web site, and obviously somebody said “WTF……?” and changed it to this:

Another example, adding to the pile of hundreds and thousands of examples, of how totally fucked up, rudderless, clueless and dysfunctional the trump administration is, in particular the Department of the Interior. 

No, this isn’t another planet. It’s Skyline Rim, near Factory Butte in eastern Utah. Massive wrinkles in the rugged landscape give this place an otherworldly appearance, especially in the fading light of dusk. Photo courtesy of Brock Slinger.

anonymous asked:

This is going to sound like a stupid question, but it seems like most of your campsites are literally just in the middle of no where, not like at a legit camping ground. Is that necessarily legal? Asking because I'm real inspired to try something like this myself

This is not a dumb question at all - and perfectly relevant to our current fight to protect our public lands.  I can legally camp in the middle of nowhere because I do so on public lands - lands owned by all American Citizens.  This is land set aside for public use - be it camping, hunting, fishing, biking, climbing, hiking, etc…  Public Lands are owned and supported by tax payers and also sometimes referred to as Federal Land (most research shows public land costs about $4 dollars per tax payer a year).  Restrictions depend on the agency that manages the area - Forest Service Land, for example, does not allow mountain biking while most BLM (Bureau of Land Management) land has very few restrictions and allows for camping almost anywhere (without the need for a campground).  However, I strongly encourage Leave No Trace ethics when camping in wilderness and if you are going to camp on our public lands please go to the following link and read the 7 Leave No Trace Principles:

 https://lnt.org/learn/7-principles 

I prefer to camp in the wild - to leave the city behind and experience the outdoors as a refuge from human impact - and in order to continue to experience it as such we need to keep it looking as if we were never there.  I am a climber, a hunter, a mountaineer, a fisher, a hiker, a biker, and most importantly I was lucky enough to be born in the USA which gives me access to public wilderness as if I had the money to own a cabin in the mountains.  However, I don’t have the money to own a cabin and so when the weekend rolls around I throw a few things in the back of the Land Cruiser and head for public lands… I find a spot that is my own, that feels as if I am one of the few lucky enough to sit on this rock and watch the sun go down - and I am lucky.  

Watch the video link below:  4 minute bipartisan history of how the USA came to have so much public federal land, specifically in the west.  This video educated me on how almost all federal land has always been federal land - and is not land that was taken from the states:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rC_mnRu-4gA

It is my opinion that there is falsehood in state legislator’s desire to want public lands to be taken from the federal government and given to the state for the resident’s interests.  Federal land is held in a trust for the use of the American people -  and that’s it, that’s all, it is there for our future generations - so that I can teach my kid to ethically hunt and camp in the mountains just as my grandfather and father taught me.  Some states do a great job with land they manage for public access, but the problem is that the land is no longer explicitly a trust and if the wrong individuals become elected, or are already are elected, that land can now be sold to private entities and will no longer be accessible to the public.  This is not to say it WILL but that it CAN… but I would rather not risk the possibility of my land being sold off so that I can not use it.  Historically this has occurred when a state’s budget isn’t balanced because it is pretty easy to sell of a chunk of land to compensate for debt.  

Please vote to protect our public lands! 

Public lands for our use and what agency manages them can be seen in the map below: 


Check out this peaceful scene at Table Rock Wilderness in Oregon for International Day of Forests. See old growth Douglas fir and western hemlock along four terrific trails as you hike up to the “fortress” of Table Rock. Breathe in the rich, forest air and remember the poem by Robert Frost, “The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep. And miles to go before I sleep. And miles to go before I sleep.” Photo by Bureau of Land Management, @mypubliclands.

For beauty off the beaten path, venture two hours southwest of Albuquerque, New Mexico to the Sierra Ladrones Wilderness Study Area. There are no trails through the area’s diverse landscapes of high mountain peaks, isolated canyons and badlands. Hiking to the top of Ladrones Mountain – pictured here during a storm – rewards visitors with stunning panoramic views of the area’s mesa grasslands and piñon-juniper woodland. Photo by Julie Aguirre, Bureau of Land Management (@mypubliclands).

Sacramento River Bend Outstanding Natural Area in California includes expansive rolling hills of blue oak and lush forests surrounding the Sacramento River and its tributaries. The beautiful and diverse habitat – home to bald eagles, osprey, deer and salmon – offers natural beauty and solitude paired with numerous recreation opportunities. You can explore the area by foot, horseback, boat and bike, and then pitch a tent at the end of the day for stunning sunsets on your public lands. Photo by Bob Wick, Bureau of Land Management (@mypubliclands).

washingtonpost.com
Trump to roll back Obama’s climate, water rules through executive action
President Trump is preparing executive orders aimed at reversing Obama-era policies on climate and water pollution, according to individuals briefed on the matter.
By https://www.facebook.com/steven.mufson

One executive order will instruct the Environmental Protection Agency to begin rewriting the 2015 regulation that limits greenhouse-gas emissions from existing electric utilities. It also instructs the Interior Department’s Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to lift a moratorium on federal coal leasing.

A second order will instruct the EPA and Army Corps of Engineers to revamp a 2015 rule, known as the Waters of the United States rule, that applies to 60 percent of the water bodies in the country. That regulation was issued under the 1972 Clean Water Act, which gives the federal government authority over not only major water bodies but also the wetlands, rivers and streams that feed into them. It affects development as well as some farming operations on the grounds that these activities could pollute the smaller or intermittent bodies of water that flow into major ones.


Bottom line: Republicans aim to a allow:

- Coal mining national parks, allowing foreign mining companies to pollute parks and not pay for clean up.
- Increase air pollution from power plants
- Dump industrial chemicals, pesticides, and livestock waste into US rivers and streams.

Zero objective analysis provided this will MAGA or create jobs.

The Iditarod National Historic Trail in Alaska encompasses a 1,500-mile system of winter trails that first connected ancient Alaska Native villages, opened up Alaska for the gold rush and now plays a vital role for travel and recreation. Maintained by the Bureau of Land Management, the trail is now mostly closely identified with the famous annual sled dog race. The race, which started this weekend, challenges the racer and the 21 dog team with harsh conditions across rugged, but beautiful terrain. Photo by Kevin Keeler, Bureau of Land Management (@mypubliclands).

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Last night’s supermoon appears as a huge, glowing orb over Cronan Ranch. At nearby Sutter’s Mill, the discovery of gold started the California gold rush. Now, the area is famous as one of the most popular whitewater rivers in the United States, and also features 12 miles of trails for hiking, biking, horseback riding, fishing and bird watching. If you missed the moon last night, be sure to check out moonrise tonight, which is projected to be equally spectacular. Photo by Bob Wick, @mypubliclands.

anonymous asked:

Wait when u say profits go to BLM do you mean Black Lives Matter or the Bureau of Land Management

Chudley proceeds go to Black Lives Matter! Unfortunately redbubble gets like 80% of the money so it might not be that much but whatever comes back to me will go to them

Handies Peak Wilderness Study Area in Colorado is breathtaking in the summer. Handies Peak rises 14,048 feet over the area, and this vibrant wilderness also hosts three major canyons, glacial cirques and three alpine lakes. Handies Peak is one of more than 500 wilderness study areas – lands unspoiled by roads or other development that provide outstanding opportunities for solitude. Photo by Bob Wick, @mypubliclands.