bulls-vs-trailblazers

Cuz I mean…we didn’t really have bags with us…and our soldiers couldn’t have known that we’d need to catch killers in the servant quarters.

Addy was wearing this under her nutcracker outfit.
It was meant for Cullen originally…but this was her only excuse not to wear that terrible outfit anymore.


Adahlen Adventures
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anonymous asked:

Why is choking someone into unconscious normally an assumed death in movies? Don't they have a chance to regain consciousness?

In the real world? Yeah. Killing someone by choking takes a long time. It’s a legitimate way to kill someone, but not an efficient one, and the timeframe you see in most films is a fraction of what you’d need to kill someone. It is worth remembering, this can kill you. This is one of those times where “safe” does not mean “non-lethal,” just that it is not immediately lethal.

In films, choking is an ideal option. In a controlled environment, it’s (relatively) safe. You can get both actors in frame together. You’ve got a lot of options to set up the shots. Finally, it’s incredibly easy to fake. You get the actors into position, one of them, “chokes,” the other without putting any pressure on the windpipe or arteries, and play the scene out.

It’s probably worth remembering, (even if some actors forget this part), that acting is a cooperative exercise. Your job isn’t just to hit your marks, spit your lines, and (occasionally) devour any unattended scenery; you also need to facilitate your fellow actors’ performances. Stage fighting is an excellent example of this. It’s not about actual violence, but it is about working together to create the illusion. If anyone gets hurt in the process, that means you can’t just reset and do another take, so this is something that the production staff and performers really want to avoid.

There are a lot of staples in film and stage violence that do not translate to the real world. They survive because of a few factors: most people don’t know what they’re seeing is unrealistic, it facilitates opportunities for acting, and it is reasonably safe.

Choking is great on film, because it gives both actors plenty of time to do whatever the script calls for. So long as no one is actually having trouble breathing, they can do this all day until the shot comes out right. Characters die from this because the power of plot compels them to, not because of any physiological considerations. Audiences believe it kills characters because, “well, I’ve got to breathe, right?” Without ever questioning how long they can actually go without oxygen. The idea that effective chokes are about cutting off the flow of blood to the brain never occurs to them.

If an actor does screw up, and accidentally starts choking their coworker, you have a lot of time to rectify that. This isn’t true for a lot of stunt fighting, where if someone screws up, someone’s going to take a hit, and all that’s left is apologies, or in some tragic cases, obituaries.

Choking, depending on where you put your pressure can also include some insane stuff you probably wouldn’t think is safe. An example would be the one handed choke that lifts the victim off the ground. You can do this a couple ways, the easiest (without rigging) is to push them up a wall, keeping your thumb and index finger under their jaw (against the bone), you’re actually lifting their head, their throat is completely safe, the airway remains clear, they can breathe, but it looks like you’re going full Darth Vader on them. Even for someone standing right there, it can be difficult to realize the victim is completely unharmed.

Beyond this, front facing chokes, like you’ll usually see in films, are very difficult to use in a real situation. As I mentioned above, they don’t really provide good access to the points you’d be trying to compress, but, they’re also difficult to complete because the victim has a lot of options. There’s a lot of counters to these, that range from simply pulling the hand free, to breaking their arm at the elbow. Wrapping an arm around the attacker’s and dragging it out of position will stop the choke, and tie up their arm.

So, no, this is something that’s used because it looks good on film, not because it has any grounding in reality.

-Starke

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We’re very, very sorry we took this long to upload. D: The tweeted version of what went on with this page was that Vale couldn’t find the right expressions when she was initially sketching the page, so that was passed onto Jam, who did an excellent job finishing that part of the process up! Then inking responsibilities were passed between two different artists, and then coloring took a good while because one artist was going through personal troubles, while the other artist he passed it to wasn’t able to get her tablet working for a while. Fun times all around. X_X

Anyway, some peeps over on Twitter made a few guesses on what we now know is St. S’s name would be, though @giancarlovolpe came up with the perfect nickname for it (”St. Bro’s”); I have the feeling Star would refer to this place by that nickname if she ever came across that place. Totally not hinting about what’s gonna happen later down the line. Nope. Not at all. I really need to sleep soon.

Art © The Blood Moon Commission

Star Vs The Forces Of Evil © @daronnefcy & Disney

Marco and Star disguised the battle armors

In “Deep Trouble #2” comic book, Star and Marco traveled into the past. When Star and Marco burst in disguised in armors, they interrupted Dirt and Princess Moon in her castle bedroom. Dirt concealed a knife behind his back for Princess Moon, but before he can assassinate the princess.