buhler's

My name is Frederick John Buhler. My life has been drastically altered due to the loophole in the current Child Citizenship Act. I was adopted from Ethiopia at five months old by Dr. John Emanuel Buhler, a U.S. Army doctor, and Mary June Buhler. I came to the U.S. at one year old, and lived with them until the age of six. In 1978, Dr. Buhler and the rest of the family moved to Germany to start a life without me. I was placed in a boys home in San Antonio, Texas, called Boysville. I was there until I turned nineteen.

Initially, Boysville they had no idea I was not a citizen until the Buhlers legally terminated their parental rights. After finding out, Boysville did nothing to help me become naturalized. After aging out of Boysville, I served two tours in the Navy, where I began to struggle with substance abuse. Navy drug and alcohol counselors diagnosed me with PTSD from my childhood, and my second enlistment ended with an other than honorable discharge.

When I was arrested in 2008 on drug charges and summoned to immigration court in 2010, I didn’t have any money to afford a lawyer and no counsel was appointed to me. Once in front of the judge I offered records proving my abandonment, education in the U.S., and service in the military. The judge said that was not necessary to consider these records in his final decision, and this moment of vulnerability reopened old wounds of abandonment. He made clear that I’m no longer even wanted in a country I served proudly. My time in detention really took a toll on me: I never felt so vulnerable in my life.

During my incarceration, I wanted help for my substance abuse and further my schooling. I was told I did not qualify due to my immigration issues.
My life has changed drastically since those bad decision days. I want more than ever to enroll in college and better my life, for me first and foremost, but also for my kids’ sake. I tell them everyday this will all pass and that their father loves them. As I say this to them, in the back of my mind, I worry I won’t be here and be able to support them in their young adult lives. They are grown now but my life was so out of control when they were younger I owe it to them to be the man God intended me to be here in this country.

One day I would love to go to Ethiopia and see where I come from. I would also like to travel without the fear of not being able to return to the only country I’ve ever known. I really need to do these things in order to stay positive and grow in my spirituality as a man. I’d like to see this country allow noncitizen adoptees like me the opportunities promised when we arrived here. Help us move forward by amending the current Child Citizenship Act. We did not ask to come here as babies, and don’t tell us because we’re convicted felons now we are no longer wanted. This country in many ways was founded on second chances.

Help the thousands of adult adoptees like Frederick and Adam by calling your member of Congress and sharing their stories! If you’re an adult adoptee who fell through the cracks of the Child Citizenship Act, we want to hear from you. #KeepUsHome

3

It’s a modified Bunkie, or a small prefabricated structure produced the Bunkie Co. that can be rapidly assembled on-site. Its designs are a joint effort among a team of architects: Nathan Buhler and Jorge Torres, furniture designer Evan Bare, and furniture manufacturer Jim Moore. The highly collaborative structures are prefabricated using CNC mill technology—essentially computer controlled drills—that ensure higher quality and better material economy than traditional methods allow. This technique produces individual parts that, much like some furniture manufacturing processes, are a ready-made fit together. The Bunkies themselves can be used as playhouses, guest rooms, home offices, and a range of other functions. Their size—about 100 square feet—means they don’t require permits for construction. More lenient codes in the U.S. has enabled the Bunkie Co. to begin designing a 200-square-foot model for the American market.


http://www.dwell.com/houses-we-love/article/high-tech-prefab-outbuilding-surprisingly-peaceful-retreat#4

My name is Frederick John Buhler. My life has been drastically altered due to the loophole in the current Child Citizenship Act. I was adopted from Ethiopia at five months old by Dr. John Emanuel Buhler, a U.S. Army doctor, and Mary June Buhler. I came to the U.S. at one year old, and lived with them until the age of six. In 1978, Dr. Buhler and the rest of the family moved to Germany to start a life without me. I was placed in a boys home in San Antonio, Texas, called Boysville. I was there until I turned nineteen.

Initially, Boysville they had no idea I was not a citizen until the Buhlers legally terminated their parental rights. After finding out, Boysville did nothing to help me become naturalized. After aging out of Boysville, I served two tours in the Navy, where I began to struggle with substance abuse. Navy drug and alcohol counselors diagnosed me with PTSD from my childhood, and my second enlistment ended with an other than honorable discharge.

When I was arrested in 2008 on drug charges and summoned to immigration court in 2010, I didn’t have any money to afford a lawyer and no counsel was appointed to me. Once in front of the judge I offered records proving my abandonment, education in the U.S., and service in the military. The judge said that was not necessary to consider these records in his final decision, and this moment of vulnerability reopened old wounds of abandonment. He made clear that I’m no longer even wanted in a country I served proudly. My time in detention really took a toll on me: I never felt so vulnerable in my life.

During my incarceration, I wanted help for my substance abuse and further my schooling. I was told I did not qualify due to my immigration issues.
My life has changed drastically since those bad decision days. I want more than ever to enroll in college and better my life, for me first and foremost, but also for my kids’ sake. I tell them everyday this will all pass and that their father loves them. As I say this to them, in the back of my mind, I worry I won’t be here and be able to support them in their young adult lives. They are grown now but my life was so out of control when they were younger I owe it to them to be the man God intended me to be here in this country.

One day I would love to go to Ethiopia and see where I come from. I would also like to travel without the fear of not being able to return to the only country I’ve ever known. I really need to do these things in order to stay positive and grow in my spirituality as a man. I’d like to see this country allow noncitizen adoptees like me the opportunities promised when we arrived here. Help us move forward by amending the current Child Citizenship Act. We did not ask to come here as babies, and don’t tell us because we’re convicted felons now we are no longer wanted. This country in many ways was founded on second chances.

Help the thousands of adult adoptees like Frederick and Adam by calling your member of Congress and sharing their stories! If you’re an adult adoptee who fell through the cracks of the Child Citizenship Act, we want to hear from you. #KeepUsHome

Ziegfeld’s Midnight Frolic Photo: Ziegfeld’s Midnight Frolic Showgirls Photo: Ziegfeld’s Midnight Frolic Performers Photo: Ziegfeld’s Midnight Frolic Performers Photo: Ziegfeld’s Midnight Frolic Murder Mystery Photo: Ziegfeld’s Midnight Frolic

If you are looking for an escape from reality, be sure to check out this 1930’s showbiz-themed, interactive show, Ziegfeld’s Midnight Frolic.

Showcasing at the old Liberty Theater in Times Square, Ziegfeld’s Midnight Frolic is taken from the Speakeasy Dollhouse series created by multi-faceted artist Cynthia Von Buhler.

The new edition of Cynthia von Buhler’s immersive, interactive mystery has a 1930’s showbiz theme and is staged site-specifically at the old Liberty Theater, a vintage venue hidden behind storefronts in Times Square. Audience members are free to wander a space filled with showgirls, aerialists and specialty cocktails.

The immersive experience allows it’s audience to become engulfed in the storyline centered around the glitz and glam of the luxurious NYC show business, in addition to cryptic insertions of death and betrayal.

With a creatively altered universe set in the 1930s and real-life references such as showbiz legends Josephine Baker and Billie Burke, the show feels all too real.

Be sure to experience the interactive extravaganza that is Ziegfeld’s Midnight Frolic this spring! The show will only be running through May, 9th, 2015 with tickets starting at $75. Liberty Theatre

* 42nd Street Entertainment Center, 233 W 41st St, New York, NY 10036
* (212) 997-0009
* themidnightfrolic.blogspot.com
* Until May 9th, 2015
* 8pm
* $75+

via Timeout

The post Escape From Reality With Ziegfeld’s Midnight Frolic, a 1930’s Themed Interactive Show appeared first on Viewing NYC

Rueben Buhler charged in Burns Lake triple homicide - CBC.ca


CBC.ca

Rueben Buhler charged in Burns Lake triple homicide
CBC.ca
A 54-year-old B.C. man has been charged following a triple homicide at a home in the remote community of Burns Lake, RCMP said Tuesday. Rueben Buhler is facing three counts of second-degree murder and is expected to appear in Burns Lake Provincial …
Man arrested after three people found dead in Burns Lake home: policeVancouver Sun
Man arrested after three people found dead in Burns Lake, BC, home: policeThe Globe and Mail
Rueben Buhler charged with second degree murderSmithers Interior News
CJFW
all 24 news articles » http://dlvr.it/9b5JZf