buffy-season-7

Chao-Ahn and her language barrier

(x)

I still can’t get over the fact that nobody bothered to find a way to communicate with Chao-Ahn the Potential in Season 7 of Buffy. So she spoke Cantonese when Giles only had a “thin” grasp of Mandarin. So what? Suddenly neither Chao-Ahn nor Giles could figure out that Mandarin and Cantonese basically shared the same written language? To the point that Giles had to draw stick-figure flashcards to inform her that she was in grave danger? To the point that he never even got her medical history (which would bring up her lactose intolerance and thus avoid the whole fiasco where Giles made her physically ill because “ice-cream is the universal language”)?

Buffy the general, training the Potentials into an army against the First, should’ve been concerned that one of her troops was missing the point of every one of her inspiring speeches, and more importantly, practical fighting lessons that could prove to be the key to survival on the battlefield. How could she be OK with allowing a Potential under her roof to be missing out on Slayer training like that?

Then there was Willow the bookworm, computer genius, and master of online search in one. And she (along with everyone else) never found a dictionary, online or offline? An ex-high school librarian surrounded by high school/college students and Slay allies who constantly research demons, couldn’t think of turning to books to break down this “formidable” language barrier in a college town?

And it’s not like they don’t constantly deal with challenging languages and texts. Latin spells never slowed down Willow’s spellcasting. The Hellmouth was full of items with inscriptions that required decoding, and prophecies that required translation. Giles spoke Sumerian and even Dawn had been (self-)taught enough of it to attempt a translation of the shadowcasters text. Sumerian, a language that’s been dead for millennia and is not even close to any modern language today outside of a few loan words. A language that’s only studied by scholars with very specific interests and not available at, for example, your local high school or community college.

But then came an actual human being whose very life had been entrusted to them, and nobody cared enough to find ways to communicate with her? Nobody tried to help?

anonymous asked:

It makes me very sad that they intended to bring Tara back in S7 but couldn't because her actress wouldn't come back :( which is also why I don't get why they don't bring her back in the comics. Whedon said he wanted to bring her back in the show (a year after her death) so... Since the comics don't require the actress, why haven't they done it?

Amber Benson did refuse to come back in Season 7, as a First Evil manifestation in Conversations with Dead People (“I just think bringing her back and making her a bad guy was not quite right for me, but I know there’s a way to do it that would be beneficial to the fans.”). Then Joss Whedon said he intended to bring Tara actually back in an episode exactly one year after Seeing Red, in which Buffy would be granted one wish and reverse Tara’s death – ironically, in this same panel he mentioned he’d soon be filming the now canceled project Ripper. Here’s a good interview with Amber about the case:

“You had people who posted on the Internet saying, ‘Thank God, Tara’s dead!” Benson recalls, “but then this plethora of people going, ‘Oh. My. God. I’m never watching that show again!” Apparently, they meant it. Buffy’s ratings dropped an average of 15 percent following Tara’s demise. “Really?” Benson responds in surprise when I mentioned it. Whedon eventually washed his hands of the controversy by claiming he “didn’t care” about social issues, but it wasn’t so simple for Benson. “[Joss] wasn’t Tara,” she explains. “He didn’t walk in her shoes.” […]

Does she believes killing Tara was a mistake? “What I feel and what they chose are not the same thing, but… I wish they hadn’t killed her,“ she says. Benson was asked to return as Tara – actually, as an evil version of Tara – in Buffy’s seventh and final season. […] “There were a lot of other reasons [I didn’t go back], but one was that I didn’t want [Tara] to go bad,” she says. “As an actor, of course, it appeals to me to play kind of evil and bitchy and sexy, but, as a human being who gets letters that say, ‘I didn’t kill myself because of what you and Alyson did,’ that part of me goes, ‘You’re not just an actor anymore; you’re making a social commentary now, baby. You’ve got to be responsible.’ And I couldn’t be responsible coming back, because as an actor you have no control.”

And what about Joss Whedon’s accusation over the summer that he had always planned a glorious, romantic reunion for Tara and Willow but Benson played the spoiler? You can almost hear her wince over the phone. “Yeah, that’s been bandied about in the press a lot,” she sighs. “You know, sometimes people tell you one thing in this world, and then things don’t turn out the way you’re told,” she says. “Who knows what Joss had 100 percent planned in his mind? I’m not psychic. I just didn’t want anyone else hurt after everything that had happened. When a character has that kind of social impact, you just don’t have the right to do anything else to her. I know Joss had good intentions, but for me, personally and professionally, it wasn’t the right decision. Besides,” she says, “I was super busy. I’d moved on from Buffy.”

So the question is: why did they kill Tara in the first place? Was she ever a priority? Why this attitude of playing like everything was meticulously planned? Would her return in other circumstances confirm it as a mistake? Why this current repetitive effort in explaining it would be unfair to bring her back, instead of trying to create a story in which it wouldn’t? Why didn’t Willow have a lasting and developing relationship ever again? Why do some characters simply go away, others are killed, and some are resurrected? Why Buffy doing the bare minimum for women and LGBT representation guarantees the series to be always remembered as a good women/LGBT show? Why do tropes like bury your gays, queerbaiting, and women in refrigerators are still a thing?

I think you know the answer.

Slayer Line Theory

Originally posted by marilynmay

A lot of people seem to have issues with the inconsistencies in the slayer line on the show, so I went through the show to try and find a reasonable explanation, and I think this pretty much covers it.

Here’s a timeline of events that fall into this theory:

PROPHECY GIRL (1x12)

Buffy dies, passing the slayer line on to Kendra; Buffy is no longer ‘The Slayer’, just a girl with slayer powers.

BECOMING PART 1 (2x21)
Kendra dies, the slayer line is passed to Faith.

THE GIFT (5x22)
Buffy dies, the slayer line is unaffected.

BARGAINING (6x01/02)

Willow calls Buffy the ‘warrior of the people’ (AKA the Slayer) in her resurrection spell. Buffy is revived as The Slayer, splitting the line in two.

SMASHED (6x09)
Because Buffy is technically The Slayer again, the demonic aspect of her strength is ‘surfaced’, explaining why Spike’s chip doesn’t fire off.

SEASON 7
The slayer line splitting (Buffy’s resurrection) causes the ‘instability’ that the Bellajoxa’s Eye tells Anya and Giles about. This creates an opportunity for the First to rise.

Hopefully this helps to fill some of gaps left by the writers.

(Feel free to add any points I missed!)

BtVS S7 (Rewatch) - Chosen

We’re gonna win.   -Buffy

Rushed, but epic.

Caleb being sliced in two is something very cool to see -  good riddance preacher!

So Angel arrives bringing the ex-machina trinket, and immediately smells Spike on Buffy; interesting that he doesn’t get horrified or even surprised by it - I mean, as far as we know, Angel doesn’t know about the soul yet. And he’s cute when he is twelve… Buffy admits to him that her not-boyfriend is in her heart, and sends Angel away with the “cookie dough” speech:

Because - OK, I’m cookie dough. I’m not done baking. I’m not finished becoming whoever the hell it is I’m gonna turn out to be. I make it through this, and the next thing, and the next thing, and maybe one day I turn around and realize I’m ready. I’m cookies. And then, you know, if I want someone to eat - or enjoy warm, delicious cookie me, then…that’s fine. That’ll be then. When I’m done.

So, kissing Angel inspires Buffy to give the “cookie dough” speech… she realizes she isn’t “done” yet. I, as a Spuffy fan, love it – it’s just Angel gently getting the brush off. And when he’s walking away, she throws him a crumble:

Angel. I do… sometimes think that far ahead. Be a long time coming. Years, if ever.

The saddest truth is that Angel CANNOT move on. Never. He must not find happiness with any woman. He is forever trapped in this existence where there is no hope of being complete, like he briefly had been with Buffy years ago. And she knows that.

Buffy returns home and finds Spike punching an horrible drawing of Angel: it’s hilarious, I mean, the drawing… Spike’s hurt, and reminds Buffy that people “don’t use their tongues to say hello” - well, actually they do… cute. Spike offers himself to wear the magical trinket, and for a second, he thinks Buffy believes he isn’t worth of it; but he’s wrong, and Buffy calls him a Champion - what a long and painful and beautiful journey for him to get to this moment!

Kennedy admits she is a brat, that’s something…

Faith’s indignation about Wood’s opinion on her bed skills is cute… I love her reaction using her hands!

Buffy’s idea to make all Potentials Slayers (after the First’s idiotic babbling) have already been discussed and criticized as something that instead of being empowering was kind of a violation of girls around the world, Potentials that didn’t have a choice in the matter. I agree that it was an imposition of a burden on those girls, but I don’t see it as something wrong at that particular moment, when time was a factor, and they had no other alternative.

So, putting aside the moral implications for a while - the spell performed by Willow and the transformation of the girls at the Hellmouth is something very empowering. Willow going all goddess instead of turning dark is heartwarming, after all predicaments she had gone through, and her fears of using magic throughout the whole season. And Kennedy supports her all the way: Come on, red. Make it happen.

The battle at the Hellmouth is epic, and some Potentials die (and I still haven’t learned their names). Buffy and Spike with their hands in flames – such beautiful image!

Spike dies in an effulgent glory - and thank goodness I knew at the time that he would be in AtS, if not, I would have cried myself to death.

Anya…

When Giles asks “what did it”, Buffy says “Spike” and looks heartbroken at the crater (Buffy’s last words spoken on the show were I love you. Spike., by the way).

The finale ends with hope in the future - and it couldn’t be different - although we all know that things will get very messy in the comics…

I really like S7.


BtVS 7x22

anonymous asked:

Now I want to read a fic where a spirit bothers s7 Scoobies & they realize it's speaking Cantonese. And everyone does their actual best & they quickly find a way to understand what it's saying. Which turns out to be something like 'stop offering my great-granddaughter dairy, she's lactose intolerant. also get a grip'.

Haha, that’s so true to canon! There’s nothing they can’t decode in order to defeat Monster of the Week. Anon, you’re hilarious! :D

7

Thank you, Buffy.

I don’t think I could ever properly express what this show has done for me. Above all else, it’s shown me that life is worth living, no matter what. This journey I’ve been on with this show…it’s changed my life. It’s brought happiness and light and perspective and warmth. Nothing has ever done this for me before. Nothing has ever made me more…me.

So, thank you, Buffy.

20th Anniversary Buffy Birthweek: 7 Seasons  

Buffy Season 7

Is my favorite season of Buffy.  

But each season has its moments and sometimes I’ll feel like another season fits my life better.  But season 7′s metaphors are my favorite.

For a long time, season 2 was my favorite, just like for a long time I shipped Buffy and Angel.  As I’ve gotten older, my feelings have changed.  Like, Riley is a good dude.  He is the guy you bring home to mom and marry.  He isn’t abusive; he isn’t significantly older than relatively-young Buffy; while he struggles with her physical strength, he ultimately realizes that Buffy’s strength is part of what he loves about her and learns that his masculinity doesn’t need to be in relation to other people.  He wants intimacy with Buffy and to share her burdens and for her to share his.  

These days I ship Buffy and Faith because I feel like they understand each other uniquely and have great chemistry.  I feel strange about it, though, because Buffy is a straight character and I don’t want to impose my desires on her, but really, shipping anyone is doing that.  So I ship Buffy and Faith these days.

This is what I love about Buffy.  It’s scripture.  I watch it again and again and it offers different things each time.  Different stories resonate differently with the passage of time and I identify with different characters at different moments in my life.  

It offers layers.  Different characters with diverse stories and personalities.  It keeps giving and I keep receiving.

BtVS S7 (Rewatch) - Touched

Things are different, because now… I’m your boss.  -Faith

At the Summers’s house, the group now leaded by Faith are arguing what they should do next, and Kennedy says something very reasonable: “Shouldn’t we get down to business and start talking about our game plan? We don’t have all the time in the world here. Or maybe we do – but that doesn’t mean much anymore.”

Meanwhile, Buffy is alone and despondent – The First has succeed in isolating the most important piece of the game. She finds a house and kicks out its owner; she is not really worried about being polite anymore. Buffy could easily look for another house, but I think that deep down her sense of duty is still there: she knows that the best thing for the guy is to leave town, like almost every other citizen have already done (even the power company people have left already, leaving Sunnydale in the dark); the guy seems to be the type who wouldn’t abandon his property without a little push.

At the house, Faith tells Kennedy to shut up when the girl is willing to contribute to the conversation; she is the one “making the rules” now. Anyway, Faith has a good idea: to kidnap a Bringer and make it talk.

Spike and Andrew, who had been sent away by Giles to a mission in Gilroy, arrive at the house; they have found something very important, and Spike wants to tell Buffy right away. He gets disgusted when he learns what happened: Buffy has been kicked out of the house by his friends, who have chosen Faith over her. Giles, Willow, Xander and Dawn are visible uncomfortable with the situation; Willow tries to explain their reasons in a most awkward way. When Spike is addressing his indignation to the Scoobies – to Buffy’s friends – Faith, all full of herself at this point, says “the time for speech-giving is over” (meaning, of course, that Buffy’s time is over) and Spike gets even madder; he punches her and a fight starts. After exchanging some blows, Spike leaves to look for Buffy.

Giles, Willow, Xander, Anya, Kennedy and Andrew interrogate the Bringer they’ve managed to kidnap; with the help of a spell (thanks to Dawn! I love this new researcher Dawn!) because the Bringers are mute, the First’s minion tells (using Andrew’s as his conduit) that they are “building an arsenal beneath the dirt, building weapons for the coming war” - and gives them an address… it has trap written all over it… Andrew later says that the stone tablets at the mission revealed that “The First and Caleb are protecting something powerful, and they don’t want the slayers to get it” - which is exactly what Buffy had said before being kicked out – and Faith decides to go to the arsenal to retrieve whatever this powerful thing is.

Late at night, The First Evil pays a visit to Faith – who settled herself in Buffy’s room, nothing less – as the  Mayor, but it is just wasting its time, Faith isn’t the one she used to be anymore. He talks about things Faith craves: to belong, to be loved, but not even for a second Faith is tempted to switch sides. Wood – the one who suggested to Buffy she should test the Potentials in battle – appears to say he “knows” Faith is a good leader, and they end up having sex; finally she can make up (with one of the most hot guys ever, I must say, but I digress) for the long incarceration….

Another person who doesn’t want to waste more time is Kennedy – Willow is surprised by the girl lying in her bed, and the two of them finally have sex. Not before Kennedy say she will be Will’s “kite string”, she’ll “tether her down”, appeasing Willow’s insecurities about losing control and going all evil again. Kennedy is good to Willow.

Why do Xander and Anya don’t get back together already?

Spike finds Buffy in the empty house; Buffy wants to quit, but Spike doesn’t want none of this. He gives her the strength and confidence she was mostly in need at the moment. Not only his insightful speech, but also his presence, put her on track again - such a beautiful moment:

You listen to me. I’ve been alive a bit longer than you, and dead a lot longer than that. I’ve seen things you couldn’t imagine, and done things I prefer you didn’t. I don’t exactly have a reputation for being a thinker. I follow my blood, which doesn’t exactly rush in the direction of my brain. So I make a lot of mistakes, a lot of wrong bloody calls. A 100+ years, and there’s only one thing I’ve ever been sure of: you. Hey, look at me. I’m not asking you for anything. When I say, “I love you,” it’s not because I want you or because I can’t have you. It has nothing to do with me. I love what you are, what you do, how you try. I’ve seen your kindness and your strength. I’ve seen the best and the worst of you. And I understand with perfect clarity exactly what you are. You’re a hell of a woman. You’re the one, Buffy.

After sleeping in Spike’s arms, Buffy wakes up renewed – she’s not quitting anymore. She knows Caleb has something of hers, and she goes to take it from him. She has figured out how to overpower this much stronger opponent: he can beat her to death - but for that, he has to catch her first. She succeeds and finally finds the mysterious powerful weapon: the Scythe.

Meanwhile, Faith and the Potentials are about to be blown up at the arsenal, because of course it’s a trap.


BtVS 7x20

  • Spike: You listen to me. I've been alive a bit longer than you, and dead a lot longer than that. I've seen things you couldn't imagine, and done things I prefer you didn't. Don't exactly have a reputation for being a thinker. I follow my blood... which doesn't exactly rush in the direction of my brain. So I make a lot of mistakes. A lot of wrong bloody calls. A hundred-plus years, and there's only one thing I've ever been sure of. You... Hey, look at me. I'm not asking you for anything. When I say I love you, it's not because I want you, or because I can't have you. It has nothing to do with me. I love what you are. What you do. How you try. I've seen your kindness, and your strength. I've seen the best and the worst of you, and I understand, with perfect clarity, exactly what you are. You're a hell of a woman. You're the One, Buffy.
  • Buffy: I don't want to be the One.
  • Spike: I don't want to be this good-looking and athletic. We all have crosses to bear.