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What’s Your Home State’s Signature Cocktail

America boasts an almost endless array of liquor, making the choice of one signature cocktail for each state a tricky task. But every state gets tipsy in its own special way, and we chose these cocktails with some semblance of logic: a combination of state of origin, popularity, and exclusivity. Not everyone will agree with all the choices, but hey, it’s all still booze. And booze is great. Cheers!

1. Alabama

Drink: The Alabama Slammer (Amaretto, Southern Comfort, Sloe Gin, orange juice)

Why?: Legend has it that the drink originated in the state in the 1970’s and is known as the signature drink of The University of Alabama Crimson Tide

2. Alaska

Drink: The Smoked Salmon Bloody Marry (Smoked Salmon Vodka, V-8 Juice, Tabasco, Worcestershire sauce,sugar, salt & pepper)

Why?: Alaska Distillery has recently produced vodka made with a secret recipe of smoked salmon caught in the Gulf of Alaska.

3. Arizona

Drink: The High and Dry (Mandarin Vodka, Triple Sec)

Why?: During the prohibition era, Phoenix featured a"secret bar" behind a bookshelf in the Arizona Biltmore, where “every self-respecting gentleman” had access to a decent highball

4. Arkansas

Drink: The Arkansas Razorback (Rum, Vodka, Amaretto Liqueur, Kahlua)

Why?: The popular cocktail shares its name with the University of Arkansas Razorbacks. You can even buy cocktail glasses embellished with the Razorback mascot

5. California

Drink: The Mai Tai (Light Rum, Dark Rum, Lime juice, Orange juice, orgeat syrup)

Why?: This fruity beverage is said to have been created by Victor “Trader Vic” Buergon at his Polynesian-style restaurant in Oakland, California.

6. Colorado

Drink: The Snowball (Vodka, Fresca, Lime juice)

Why?: The interesting combo of vodka and lemonade is also popular in the U.K., but this combo of Colorado Premium Vodka and Fresca makes this drink uniquely Coloradan 

7. Connecticut

Drink: The Limonata (Vodka, Sparkling Lemonade, blood - orange juice)

Why?: Available exclusively at Ballo at the Mohegan Sun in Monteville, Connecticut, this drink features a sphere of frozen blood orange that adds sweet flavor to the cocktail as it melts.

8. Delaware

Drink: Blueberry Vodka Tonic (Vodka, Blueberries and lots of Time

Why?: Unlike typical vodka tonics, Delaware’s blueberry version features a vodka infused with fresh blueberries for over a month.

9. Florida

Drink: The Rum Runner (Captain Morgan, blackberry liqueur, creme de bananes, orange juice)

Why?: Rum Runners are said to have been invented in the 1950’s at the Holiday Isle Tiki Bar in Islamorada, Florida.

10. Georgia

Drink: The Scarlet O'Hara (Southern Comfort, cranberry juice, lime wheel)

Why?: There are several varieties to “The Scarlet O'Hara” but  in Georgia, they typically feature Southern Comfort.

11. Hawaii

Drink: The Blue Hawaiian (Light Rum, Vodka, Blue curacao, Pineapple juice,sweet & sour mix)

Why?: This tropical cocktail was invented by Harry Yee, a legendary bartender at the Hilton Hawaiian Village in Waikiki.

12. Idaho

Drink: Spring Whiskey Sling (Blended whiskey, Lime juice, sugar, water)

Why?: The Red Feather Lounge in Idaho features a famed Spring Whiskey Sling that was featured in the “Best of List” in The New York Times.

13. Illinois

Drink: The Chicago Fizz (Dark rum, Ruby port, lemon juice, sugar, club soda, egg white)

Why?: While New Orleans is credited with the origination of the fizz, the Chicago variation’s claim to fame was its popularity at the Waldorf-Astoria bar in New York during the pre-prohibition era.

14. Indiana

Drink: The Refined Janet Guthrie (Sweet Tea vodka, Refined Mixers margarita mix)

Why?: In honor of the Indy 500, this beverage was created to commemorate the first woman that qualified and drove in the race.

15. Iowa

Drink: The Iowa Sunrise (Bacardi white rum, Vodka, Lemonade, Sprite, Orange juice, grenadine)

Why?: While similar to many cocktails in composition, the Iowa version is said to represent the beautiful sunrise over Iowa in winter mornings.

16. Kansas

Drink: The Pendergast (Buffalo Trace Bourbon, sweet vermouth, Benedictine, and Angostura bitters)

Why?: This cocktail is named for Thomas Pendergast, a Kansas City politician famed for his populist touch and connections with the Mafia during the Prohibition.

17. Kentucky

Drink: The Mint Julep (Bourbon, sugar, water)

Why?: The origins of the drink are murky, but the mint julep was introduced by US Senator Henry Clay during the 18th century.

18. Louisiana

Drink: The Sazerac (Rye Whiskey, Peychaud’s bitters, sugar, absinthe)

Why?: In June 2008, the Louisiana Legislature proclaimed the Sazerac as New Orleans’ official cocktail.

19. Maine

Drink: Dust to Dust (Cold River Vodka, Domaine de Canton ginger liqueur, Aperol, ginger syrup)

Why?: The bar Grace, located in Portland, Maine, is famous for this unique ginger cocktail.

20. Maryland

Drink: The Black-Eyed Susan (42 Below Vodka, Early Times Kentucky Whiskey, sweet & sour mix, and orange juice)

Why?: The cocktail, named after Maryland’s state flower, is the official drink of the Preakness Stakes.

21. Massachusetts

Drink: Drink: The Cape Codder (Vodka and cranberry juice)

Why?: The drink was conceived by the Ocean Spray cranberry growers under the name “Red Devil,” which was later changed to “The Cape Codder” in the 1960’s.

22. Michigan

Drink: Drink: The Golden Cadillac (Creme de cacao (white), Vodka, Galliano, blueberries, water, sugar, and lemon juice)

Why?: While the cocktail was created in California, it’s famed name (Cadillac, of the Motor City origin) and taste has made it a popular beverage in many bars in Michigan.

23. Minnesota

Drink: Drink: The Bootleg (Bootleg mix, gin, vodka/light rum, and club soda)

Why?: Bootleg cocktails are made specifically from Bootleg Mix, which can only be purchased from the Woodhill Country Club in Wayzata, Minnesota.

24. Mississippi

Drink: Drink: Mississippi Punch (Dark rum, bourbon, brandy/cognac, fresh lemon juice, and sugar)

Why?: This cocktail recipe was first printed in Jerry Thomas’ The Bon Vivant’s Companion, attributing its location in Mississippi.

25. Missouri

Drink: The Missouri Mule (Bourbon, Applejack, lemon juice, Campari, and Cointreau)


Why?: The cocktail was created for President Harry S. Truman, with its name representing his home state of Missouri and the donkey mascot of the Democratic Party.

26. Montana

Drink: The Montana Tornado (Jack Daniel’s Tennessee whiskey, gin, tequila, and 7 Up)


Why?: Unlike other tornados, the Montana Tornado features 7 Up instead of the commonly used Coca-Cola. The drink is also served in a mason jar instead of the typical cocktail glass.

27. Nebraska

Drink: The Kool-Aid Caddy (Orange vodka and Kool-Aid)


Why?: Kool-Aid was invented in Hastings, Neb, by Edwin Perkins. Naturally, the state boasts a beverage in his honor.

28. Nevada

Drink: The Nevada Cocktail (Light rum, grapefruit juice, lime juice, and sugar)


Why?: In honor of Nevada Day, which falls on the last Friday of October, many drink this cocktail to celebrate.

29. New Hampshire

Drink: The Gin-Esaisquoi (Lillet blanc, Velvet Falermum, egg whites, and orange bitters)


Why?: This drink was originated at the White Mountain Cider Company in Glen, NH by bartender Jeff Grdinich for his friend Kevin Ginestet, who, ironically, is allergic to eggs and does not drink alcohol.

30. New Jersey

Drink: The Applejack (Applejack brandy, lemon juice, and grenadine)


Why?: During the colonial period in New Jersey, the Applejack was used as currency to pay road construction crews. New Jersey also boasts the oldest licensed distillery, Laird & Company, which continues to produce applejack.

31. New Mexico

Drink: La Paloma (Tequila and grapefruit soda)


Why?: This cocktail was first recognized in Evan Harrison’s Popular Cocktails of the Rio Grande. Known as “The Dove” in Spanish, it’s origins are claimed to be somewhere along the Rio Grande.

32. New York

Drink: The Moscow Mule (Vodka, lime juice, ginger beer)


Why?: The cocktail is said to have been invented in 1941 by John G. Martin of G.F. Heublein Brothers, Inc., an East Coast spirit producer and Jack Morgan, President of Cock ‘n’ Bull Products.

33. North Carolina

Drink: Dirty Beetz (Vodka, beet juice, lime juice, and orange juice)


Why?: The Fiction KItchen, a local Raleigh haunt, features this cocktail. Created by Christopher Tamplin, the use of beets creates a vibrantly colored cocktail when garnished with a lime and orange peel. 

34. North Dakota

Drink: The Howlin’ Wolf (White Creme de Menthe, blue curacao, vodka, and Sprite)


Why?: It’s no surprise that this drink is named after North Dakota’s state animal, the coyote (AKA prairie wolf).

35. Ohio

Drink: The Black Gold (Captain Morgans, Jose Cuervo Gold Tequila, Sierra Mist, and Grenadine)


Why?: The Kentucky Derby, the Preakness, and the Belmont Stakes have specialty cocktails, naturally the folks in Thistledown wanted to create a drink to represent the Ohio Derby. The Black Gold is named after the only horse to win both the Kentucky Derby and the Ohio Derby.

36. Oklahoma

Drink: The Farmer’s Daughter (Vodka, fresh strawberries, basil leaves, and simple sugar)


Why?: Lobby Bar, located in Oklahoma City, specializes in maintaining the tried-and-true nature of cocktails while adding an individual twist, crafting each individually with added, natural ingredients. Each of their Farmer’s Daughter cocktails is made with fresh fruit.

37. Oregon

Drink: Flaming Ring of Fire (High proof rum, whiskey, and tabasco sauce)


Why?: Named after Oregon’s location in “The Pacific Ring of Fire ”, this shot turns up the heat with added Tabasco sauce.

38. Pennsylvania

Drink: The Bronx (Gin, Sweet red vermouth, dry vermouth, and orange juice)


Why?: Strangely, this cocktail was created by Joseph S. Sormani in Philadelphia, a retired Bronx restauranteur.

39. Rhode Island

Drink: Rhode Island Red (Partida Blanco tequila, chambord, lemon juice, agave nectar, orange bitters, and ginger beer)


Why?: While hailing from California, this drink was created to salute the 350th anniversary of Rhode Island’s reception of a Colonial Charter.

40. South Carolina

Drink: The Hemingway Mojito (Bacardi, sunset-red Italian Campari, muddled mint & grapefruit, soda water, and grapefruit juice)


Why?: Amen Street’s, located in Charleston, mixologists created a cocktail to match the colorful like of Ernest Hemingway. The drink boasts beautiful colors to reflect Hemingway’s love for Key West’s sunsets.

41. South Dakota

Drink: The President (Light rum, grenadine, and orange juice)


Why?: Over 2 million people visit South Dakota annually to visit this befitting cocktail’s dedication, the Presidents of Mount Rushmore.

42. Tennessee

Drink: Lynchburg Lemonade (Jack Daniel’s whiskey, Triple sec, sweet & sour, and Sprite)


Why?: This famous cocktail got its name from the Jack Daniel’s Distillery in Lynchburg, Tennessee. Alabama restauranteur Tony Mason brought JD to court, alleging that the distillery stole his recipe, but a judge declined his request for $13 million in damages.

43. Texas

Drink: The Mexican Martini (Tequila, Cointreau orange liqueur, sweet & sour mix, lime juice, orange juice, and Sprite)


Why?: This cocktail variation of a margarita is served straight up in a cocktail glass and can be served extra spicy. This drink was created and continues to be incredibly popular in Austin, TX.

44. Utah

Drink: The Mountain Derby (Woodford Reserve, grapefruit juice, honey, and lemon juice)


Why?: This interesting cocktail was created by Dave Wallace and beat out other cocktails in a competition held in Park City, UT. As a result, his concoction is now featured on drink menus at bars and restaurants all over the city for six months.

45. Vermont

Drink: The Old Vermont (Gin, maple syrup, lemon juice, orange juice, and bitters)


Why?: For a true version of an Old Vermont, a bartender needs to use Barr Hill Gin from Vermont.

46. Virginia

Drink: The Copper Barley (Campari, sweet vermouth, and soda water)


Why?: The Copper Barley is a cocktail that uses malt exclusively from the Virginia Highland Malt distillery.

47. Washington

Drink: The Washington Apple (Vodka, Sour Apple Schnapps, and apple juice)


Why?: This can be served as a martini, a shooter, or on the rocks, but its main ingredient is Washington apples from, well, Washington.

48. West Virginia

Drink: The Persephone (Bourbon, whiskey, triple sec, lemon juice, and egg whites)


Why?: This holiday inspired, champagne-based cocktail was featured in the West Virginia Gazette by its style team.

49. Wisconsin

Drink: The Tom and Jerry (Rum/brandy/whiskey, egg whites, vanilla extract, sugar, nutmeg, and powdered milk)


Why?: This Christmastime cocktail was originally created by journalist Pierce Egan in the 1820s, but continues to be most popular in Wisconsin.

50. Wyoming

Drink: The Boiler Maker (Light draft beer and whiskey)


Why?: Similar to Old Faithful in Wyoming, The Boiler Maker is a geyser of sorts. To consume this cocktail, you first have to drop the shot of whiskey into the beer, then down the entire thing in one gulp.

Bonus: Washington D.C.

Drink: The Rickey (Gin, lime juice, and carbonated water)


Why?: While the drink was created in the 1880’s, the drink maintains its popularity as one of the most popular gin cocktails in the area and even has a virgin version called the “lime rickey”.

White America and The Opinions Of Black Celebrities: Part 2,651

I was sitting in a restaurant when I heard it. A restaurant much like any other restaurant that is acutely aware of its pretentiousness. Just imagine a place where all the patrons drink Fernet Branca, quote Jaden Smith unironically, and wear sunglasses regardless of the time of day or them being inside an actual, y'know, establishment with it’s own lighting. Busy as I was by being so deeply committed to this douche-esque thoughtful critique of my environment while simultaneously glided over the implications of my character by willingly being there when it happened.

“I mean *jowl assisted chuckle* how can he say that with his millions and millions of dollars. I don’t see him going to the inner city to help any of these people he’s talking about. Just shut up and stick to football, you know.”

It doesn’t take a morphine-addicted Sherlock Holmes to deduce that he was talking about San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick. Who famously remained seated during last Friday’s Star-Spangled Banner number before a preseason game. He clarified his actions by saying “I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color. … There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder.” A sentiment that I wholly endorse, which in turn makes my resentment of Blake McDoucheface IV (I’m sure it’s not far from his real name.)

Much like the luggage of anyone who’s prepared a bug-out bag in case Trump is elected, there’s a lot to unpack here. I’m doing this by way of writing while stewing and replaying that statement over and over in my head. As potentially ignorant as it may sound, I didn’t have to turn around to confirm the skin complexion of the person who made a comment so stupid they must’ve brought it second hand from the trunk of Johnny Depp’s assistant. Nor did I have to have any particular insight into who they are to know that they’re probably the type to insist, laboriously, that GamerGate was about “ethics in video game journalism” or some other vinegar-based horseshit instead of a poorly-acted charade to assault people who have the gall to possess an actual vagina. So, I’m writing this in the interest of expediency and my own personal decompression.(Very counter productive for me if some random brochella jerk were to catch these hands like the Zika Virus.) So lets’s pick this stale ass turkey apart piece by piece:

  • If the basic movement of your mouth and jaw is wholly dependent on the rolls of fat you have stored there like newspapers on A&E’s Hoarders, then maybe you shouldn’t be so critical of someone exercising their, peaceful yet deafening, freedom of expression. After all, you’ve expressed your, peaceful yet deafening, freedom to abstain from having a neck that doesn’t look like a belly in it’s third-trimester of pregnancy with ballpark franks.
  • Where on the conventional metric of financial success does someone lose the right to speak about injustice? Is it somewhere between “I Shop At Whole Foods” and “Yes, I Do Own A Bidet. Why Do You Ask?”. I really want to know, because the subtext in someone contending that his millions somehow makes him immune/oblivious to structural racism is dumber than the entire concept of ass to mouth. One could argue that, because of his status and the large platform by which he has to speak, he has a moral obligation to call out breaches of integrity concerning law enforcement. Especially in regards to people who live in communities so unfairly targeted that the frickin’ Department of Justice basically had to step in and stop cops from treating Baltimore citizens like dark-skinned black men treat women in Tyler Perry movies. No one would be talking about Colin Kaepernick, the Ikea Sales Associate. No one would give a roasted fuck if Colin Kaepernick, Google Fiber Representative, said this in between annoyingly enthusiastic sales pitches for faster-than-ever Internet. Say what you will about the societal implications, but his fame and fortune grant him a bigger voice than the rest of us.
  • We all know that when someone uses the term “inner city” and “these people,” what they’re actually referring to is niggers and nigger babies. Just once, I would love to hear a white person refer to a group of black and brown children as “nigger babies.” I wouldn’t even be upset. I’d just breathe a prolonged sigh of relief that someone finally decided to be honest instead of burying their dog whistle racism under dulcet tones of condescension and white guilt. Also, I think people forget how real change is affected. Just throwing money at a situation does nothing to remedy the actual problem of economic disenfranchisement, institutional and systemic racism prevalent in both state and federal levels of government, and the fact that most people of color simply inhabit a different space than their white counterparts. This is why you don’t just keep throwing ACE bandages at the women in battered womens shelters after giving them all 30-second pep talks. It’s why you don’t expect the drug flow within challenged communities to stop once you’ve arrested the dude that does all of his deals in the bathroom of the Arby’s on Peachtree. You identify and strategize against the root of the problem. That problem being how some Americans can confuse patriotism with jingoism and simultaneously ignoring the struggles of their fellow countrymen with such ease you’d think all of black America was Bruce Willis in The Sixth Sense.
  • “Just stick to football.” This is the most egregious of all, at least to me. If this were the only sentiment the gentleman had expressed that I overheard, it would have been enough for me to transform into some kind of Black Rage Hulk. Rampaging throughout the streets of Atlanta while reciting excerpts from every Ta-Nehisi Coates article I’ve ever read. This implies that a black celebrity’s only value is that by which they’ve achieved fame. That they are stripped of all thought, intellectual or otherwise, agency, and capacity to grasp issues larger than themselves. Essentially, that we are all nothing but vessels from which you derive your entertainment. This is evident every time a Black celebrity expresses an opinion formulated through observation and simple deductive reasoning. We are more than just repositories for catchy pop culture phrases and ephemeral dance crazes. The fact that we keep asserting asserting as much is guaranteed to ruffle the feathers of White America more than Michelle Obama speaking common facts by saying that slaves built the White House.

I suppose that maybe these four cups of coffee, glass of Buffalo Trace Bourbon neat, and the most delightful cucumber tea sandwich I’ve ever had has made me more than a touch sensitive. Maybe I’m just reacting to this poor fellow’s statement from a place of indignation that’s only heated by the small proximity I have from when I initially heard the news. That is also a possibility. But, chances are, I’m not overly sensitive nor too caught within the moment to see a situation for what it clearly is: A large number of people saying that the flag is the quintessential representation of what it means to be free. And to exercise that freedom by protesting what amounts to a racist 19th-century pop ballad (think Ted Nugent and Toby Keith getting drunk on moonshine after watching Civil War reenactments somewhere in southern Arizona. Then writing a song on the back of a of Trump/Pence shirt they bought at a yard sale. That song would be the Star-Spangled Banner.) It’s enough of a logical quagmire to make your teeth itch, and you’re eyes bleed, but enough people seem to think it makes perfect sense. Clearly, I have a lot to learn from “these people.”