10

Trump is slashing funding to public education, social safety net and domestic programs, but adding to the largest military budget in the world. And the increased funding to Homeland Security and the Veterans Administration is quietly being steered to privately owned, for-profit contractors. And Paul Ryan is eying cuts to Medicare, replacing guaranteed benefits with skimpy little vouchers that won’t cover anything. All this while planning to deregulate the healthcare insurance industry and kick 20 million newly insured people off Obamacare. All so that insurance companies can go back to limiting the healthcare you get while making huge profits off of the sick and elderly.

No matter what they say, this is what Republicans do. This is what they always do. Rob the poor and give to the rich.

Don’t tell me what you value. Show me your budget, and I’LL TELL YOU what you value. - Joe Biden

Masterposts

10 Gift Ideas for The Broke Person: Gift giving can get expensive. Here’s how to work it into your budget. Click here.

Adulting: I make weekly “Adulting” posts that cover food, cleaning, saving money, and living on your own. Click here.

Balancing a Checkbook: How to balance a checkbook (and some relationship advice). Click here.

Budgeting on Minimum Wage: Some tips/tricks to living off a minimum wage budget. I also offer example budgets based on full time and part time minimum wage salaries.  Click here.

Car Insurance: Looking into car insurance but unsure where to start? Click here.

First Apartment: Learn how to look for apartments, set up your utilities, plus general first apartment advice. Click here.

Gym memberships: My weirdly popular post about gym membership. Click here.

Jobs: My post with helpful links to cover letter and resume writing. Click here.

Living on Your Own: Transitioning from a roommate situation to living on your own for the first time? Click here.

Living on Your Own (With Cats): My personal favorite post, detailing how to live on your own with cats and not loose your mind. Click here.

Long Distance: Advice on long distance relationships. Click here.

Meal Tips: My quintessential guide to feeding yourself on a student or small budget. Click here.

Paper Organization: Learn how to keep your important documents in order. Click here.

Renting vs. Student Housing: Weigh the pros and cons of renting off campus and living on campus. Click here.

Storage: I get so many storage related questions. Here are some thoughts on storage in small apartments and dorm rooms. Click here.

Tomato Sauce: Here’s a post entirely devoted to making tomato sauce. It’s cheap, easy to make, and so delicious. Click here.

Here’s How to Eat Vegan for a Week For Under $50

Some of the most affordable foods on the planet are vegan, including rice, beans, legumes, pasta, and all kinds of fruits and veggies. Despite this, people will often ask us about eating vegan on a budget.

So we’ve compiled some handy tips and tricks that will keep you veg without breaking the bank:

Dry beans are worth the wait.
Sure, you have to soak them overnight, but dry beans are exponentially cheaper than canned. They’re also a delicious, protein-packed essential in a budget-friendly vegan diet.

Buy it frozen.
One great way to save money is to reduce food waste. Frozen veggies like corn, peas, and green beans are great because they last almost forever.

Get into oatmeal.
Yeah, oatmeal is a super secret vegan hack. It’s filling, loaded with iron and calcium, and one of the cheapest things you could eat for breakfast.

Stick with produce under $2 per pound.
When choosing fresh fruits and veggies, try to stick with items under $2/lb.

If you want to splurge, buy some Vegenaise.
Of course you can just use it like mayo, but you can also create sour cream (just add lemon juice), salad dressings, and sauces with this must-have specialty item.

Soup is a thing.
Soups loaded with veggies, grains, and beans hold well as leftovers, stretch your dollars, and make great filling meals!

Stick with staples.
Rice, pasta, and peanut butter are all great choices for affordability and versatility.

Every night can be taco night.
Put those tasty veggies and beans to use inside a toasted tortilla! Add some Vegenaise sour cream and you’ve got yourself a tasty and inexpensive vegan dinner.

The Domestic Garden Witch: Po-Ta-Toes

So maybe you’re a college witch with limited space and money, limited to the one window in your dorm. Or, maybe you’re a witch without extensive backyard space who wants to start up a magical garden. Perhaps you’re a kitchen witch who wants the freshest herbs right at her fingertips.

For many witches, having a garden seems to be a bit of a no-brainer. After all, plants and magic go hand-in-hand. Plus, when thinking of a witch, it’s hard not to think of a cottage in the woods with a little vegetable garden out front. Unfortunately for the majority of us, our cottage in the woods is a tiny flat, and our garden out front is a windowsill with limited space.

This is when it comes time to embrace your craftiness and bring your garden indoors! Not only does it place your garden in a convenient location, it also allows you to freshen the air, recycle what would otherwise harm the earth, and embrace your witchy green thumb!

Samwise Gamgee’s Dream Come True!

Originally posted by straightcray

Okay, so if you follow my blog, chances are that you’re wondering if this whole potato theme for today is because of St. Patrick’s. I promise, I’m not enforcing Irish stereotypes on purpose. I just really like potatoes, and when it comes to gardening, it’s a bit of a disservice to overlook this vegetable. After all, when we think about kitchen gardens or home gardens, we think of herbs or flowers, and not about the veggies we eat that live a rather subterranean existence. But potatoes - those lovely little brown lumps that we can get for a couple dollars per five pound bag in the supermarket - are not only inexpensive. They’re extremely hardy little plants that can be grown rather easily.

You don’t need much to get started with this project. First, you need “seed potatoes.” This is not hard to find. Simply take a few potatoes and allow them to grow a bit. They will sprout a few short little stalks from the eyes on the surface. Save these, and get potting mix and two medium to large plastic pots that can easily stack one inside the other.

Carefully cut a few panes out of the inner pot as in the picture above, then place the inner pot into the outer one. Fill the pot part way with soil, add your seed potatoes, and cover them with potting mix. Water as needed until the potato plants peek up out of the soil. Cover them again and repeat this process gradually until the pot is full.

In roughly three months, you’ll have potato plants that are ready to begin harvesting. Simply lift the inner pot up and pluck your potatoes as needed from the sides! Fresh potatoes, free!

Ideally, this method of potato cultivation can help feed a family of four for about a year. My family had used this method, and our family of five was able to stay fed for a year off of two of these planters (we like potatoes… and we eat them a lot…)

Originally posted by relatable-anime-moments

How Can I Witch This?

Potatoes are very useful in witchcraft, and you can find out some of their magickal uses in my Foodie Friday article about Seafood Gnocchi. As for growing them, many of those properties remain the same!

As with any gardening venture, add crystals to the soil to promote healthy and fruitful plants, draw sigils and symbols on the pottery or planters, and incorporate protection or fertility ingredients into the soil - such as eggshell or coffee grounds.

Outside of the useful culinary benefits of having a potato planter on your front porch, a garden such as this is useful for outdoor space cleansing in small spaces, and for inviting prosperity into your home or property since potatoes represent such comforts as full bellies and pockets.

Since a small number of potatoes can be used to produce a much larger quantity in this planting method, you could even turn them into a prosperity or slow growth money spell! Pour your intent into the seed potatoes when you plant them, and as they produce new crops, give them water and food as an offering in order to keep the spell fed! Some of the potatoes produced in this way can also be converted into offerings or used in spellwork, in addition to being used to cook with!

The possibilities are practically endless where potatoes are concerned! See what you can do with these nifty little spuds!

And may your harvests always be bountiful!

Blessed Be! )O(

Ramen hacks 101

Hey does anyone else have a lot of trouble getting out of bed and feeding themselves sometimes? Yeah me too. BUT I’ve basically gotten the cheap, easy, fast ramen thing down to a T by this point and thought I’d share it with you guys. It can be made very easily for any type of diet, including gluten-free, vegan and vegetarian. 

Time: Will vary depending on your ingredients, but at minimum it’ll take about 5-10 minutes. 

For just a soup base+noodles, you will need:

  • A package of cheap-ass ramen noodles - throw away the seasoning packet or save it to use with something else. Buy in bulk if you don’t want to go to the store every time you want noodles. If you’re gluten-free, get rice noodles or another gluten-free option. 
  • Miso paste - I got mine for about $3, and it lasts for a very long time in the fridge. Pro tip: it’s cheaper at an Asian grocery store or market if you have access to one.
  • Stock cube/paste - around $2 at my local grocery store. I went for low-sodium chicken stock cubes, but you use your preferred type.
  • Water - about 2-3 cups for one portion depending on how big your bowl is. Remember, if you’re adding in extras, the liquid level will rise. I’ve made that mistake way too many times.

If you want extras, some good options to mix and match at your preference/budget/convenience are

Vegetables:

  • Bean sprouts - super cheap at the grocery store. Just throw a handful in and call it a day. I like mine to still be a little crunchy so I do it in the last 2 minutes of cooking.
  • Snow peas - ditto to the bean sprouts. Extras can be frozen.
  • Onion - I typically use half or a quarter of a white onion cut into thin slices, and tossed in the broth asap because I like it a bit more tender. Freeze the rest if you’re not going to be using it within the next few days.
  • Green onion/scallions - 1-2 will be good for one portion. Slice in thin disks, or on an angle if you’re fancy. Also you can use both the tops (green) and the bottoms (white), but that’s to your preference. I typically use these as a garnish, but you can add them in whenever you’d like.
  • Bok/pak choi - one of my favorite vegetables in the entire world. It can be found in most grocery stores nowadays, but is much cheaper at an Asian market if you have access to one. Cut off the very bottom part and then cut the pieces in half length-wise. Throw them in at the beginning if you like them softer, or in the last 3 minutes if you still want them a bit crunchy.
  • Spinach - just chuck in a handful whenever. Spinach can also be used frozen and is often cheaper to either buy it already frozen, or buy fresh in bulk and store it in your freezer to have forever. Get those vitamins!
  • Shredded carrot - you may not have the time/energy to shred carrots. Buy the pre-shredded kind and freeze whatever you have left over.
  • Corn - use frozen.
  • Mushrooms - slice thinly or buy pre-sliced. Add to broth toward the beginning.

Protein:

  • Tofu - silken tofu is usually the best option for this, but use whatever it is you have/can afford. Cut into small cubes and add whenever you’d like.
  • Soft-boiled egg - how to boil an egg or whatever your favorite method is.
  • Chicken - use leftover cooked chicken to add to your soup or slice a raw chicken breast thinly and poach it at a gentle simmer in the broth for 7-10 minutes or until it is white and opaque. It does take a little extra time, but you don’t actually have to do anything while it cooks and this will add extra flavor. Pre-marinated chicken is good for this as well (look for “Asian” flavors like soy, sesame, ginger, garlic, chili, etc.). Again, more expensive or time-consuming if you’re marinating it yourself, but it’s up to you. 
  • Shrimp - use pre-cooked frozen shrimp to save time and just dump in a handful. Buy the frozen stuff in bulk. Or, like with the chicken, poach raw shrimp in the broth until they are pink and opaque. 

Additional flavorings:

  • Garlic - either use a garlic crusher if you have it or just toss in thin slices into the pan with a little bit of veg or sesame oil for about 2 minutes, before you add your liquid. I buy pre-crushed frozen garlic that comes in little cubes and just pop them straight into whatever I’m cooking. There’s also that pre-crushed/chopped garlic in a paste or little jars. The pre-prepared stuff is more expensive than just buying bulbs of garlic BUT it will last you a while and saves a lot of time and energy.
  • Ginger - same as the garlic.
  • Chilis - chopped into thin disks. Take out the seeds and white part inside the chili if you don’t like it too spicy. Add as a garnish or into the broth if you like it a little spicier.
  • Hot sauce - use your favorite brand.
  • Chili oil - I got mine for about $1.50 and it’s a must-have for me in my soup. I drizzle a couple teaspoons on top when my soup is all done.
  • Soy sauce - light or dark soy is fine. Add as much or as little as you like.
  • Sesame oil - this is quite strong, so a little goes a long way. Use about a teaspoon.
  • Fish sauce, oyster sauce, rice wine/mirin/sake - these are great flavors but may be a bit harder to find and tend to be a little more expensive. Use about 1-2 teaspoons if you have it.
  • Cilantro - throw the stalks into your broth and strain them out afterward or just use the leaves as a garnish.
  • Lemon or lime - a squeeze to taste.
  • Sesame seeds - sprinkle on top.

Like I said, all the above ingredients are simply suggestions. It’s up to you to decide what you want, what you have the time and energy for, and what you can afford. This is just to show you the range of options.

Method:

  1. Prep whatever ingredients you’re using (slice/chop/take out of freezer). If you’re not using any, just go to step 2.
  2. Bring 2-3 cups of water to a boil. If you have an electric kettle, this will make the process much quicker.
  3. Add in your stock cube and miso paste and cook for about 2 minutes until they dissolve. You may want to stir a couple times just to help it along. 
  4. Add in whatever vegetables/protein/additional flavorings above suit your fancy and cook to your liking. 
  5. Add noodles and cook for 3 minutes. 
  6. Put food in bowl. Don’t worry about making it pretty. Garnish as you like.
  7. Put food in mouth. 

Done!

Put any leftover soup you may have into a tupperware or thermos and take it to work/school the next day. Or save it for 3-4 days in the fridge and heat it up when you’re hungry. 

Another pro tip: you can make the soup base in bulk and freeze whatever you don’t use. when you want soup but don’t want to go through the whole process again, stick the frozen soup in the microwave/melt in a pot on the stove, bring to a boil, add in your noodles/extras and you’re good to go.

Enjoy!

so you’re a witch on a budget…

ok i’m going to give you a hint

it’s called

cash liquidator stores


everything is like 99¢ there or less


think i’m lying??

LOOK AT THIS SHIT


That is Not All


fuckin 99¢ for a reed diffuser set? HELL YEA



Some good star shit for holding candles, ONLY $1.49



THESE THINGS



PLANNERS to plan out full moons and all that shit (yea I’m wearing pink socks they’re cute leave me alone)



$5 for a giant thing of sea salt



SPICES AND HERBS



for cursing some people who rly deserve it


AND I LIVE IN A SMALL TOWN

Imagine what YOU could find. go check it out sometime, fellow broke witches

💰✨Broke Witch Tips✨💰
  • Wal-Mart has incense sticks/cones in packs of 40 for 84¢ and a standard wood burners for 84¢ as well. Add the cost of a lighter and you can now cleanse anything for less than $4.00
  • If you want to get a little fancier, Wal-Mart also has decorative incense stick holders and cone covers from $4-$10 I have a flower blossom stick holder I got for $5 that not only looks adorable but comes with quite a bit of incense in the set
  • Around back to school time, notebooks are very cheap-for my first/rough draft grimoire I got a pretty pink composition notebook for 50¢ and a pack of pens for $1.00-use this to record all the information you want to put in your final draft grimoire here (and honestly it’s great to have just a little book that I don’t care if it gets battered up)
  • Like pasta? Save your sauce jars, wash them out well, and BOOM-spell jars.  I’ve been living off shells with Alfredo sauce and I’m saving up tons and tons of jars
  • DOLLAR STORES-literally most of my witchy stuff I got at my local dollar store. Dollar stores are the absolute best for finding candles. They have tall candles, short candles, tea candles, votive candles, scented candles, unscented candles, LED candles, candle holders, you name it, dollar stores have it. So far from my local dollar store I’ve gotten
    • 3 tall, unscented candles in glass jars (1 white, 1 yellow and 1 blue)
    • a 16 PACK of unscented tea candles. that’s right, SIXTEEN. for a DOLLAR. that’s less than 10¢ a candle
    • a really adorable holder for said tea candles
    • a 2 pack of white, unscented taper candles
    • a medium sized LED candle (batteries were included in this one, but that was the only one I could find with batteries included, however most dollar stores also sell batteries)
  • Don’t have the space for a big tabletop altar (also for closeted witches)? a tin of mints is around $2.50 and, empty of mints, makes a great tiny, hide-able altar space. it fits conveniently in a purse or bag and won’t arouse suspicion. Tape sigils to the inside, spell recipes on tiny cards, chants, a tea light and a lighter, the possibilities are endless
  • follow crystal shops on Instagram, a lot of crystal shops will have ‘flash sales’ on social media, so you can scoop up great crystals for a good price
The Domestic Garden Witch: Living in the Gutter

So maybe you’re a college witch with limited space and money, limited to the one window in your dorm. Or, maybe you’re a witch without extensive backyard space who wants to start up a magical garden. Perhaps you’re a kitchen witch who wants the freshest herbs right at her fingertips.

For many witches, having a garden seems to be a bit of a no-brainer. After all, plants and magic go hand-in-hand. Plus, when thinking of a witch, it’s hard not to think of a cottage in the woods with a little vegetable garden out front. Unfortunately for the majority of us, our cottage in the woods is a tiny flat, and our garden out front is a windowsill with limited space.

This is when it comes time to embrace your craftiness and bring your garden indoors! Not only does it place your garden in a convenient location, it also allows you to freshen the air, recycle what would otherwise harm the earth, and embrace your witchy green thumb!

Get Your Head Out of the Gutter! Now Get Dirty!

Growing up, my family had always been about thinking creatively when it comes to home improvement. After all, my mom’s family used to flip houses, and my dad’s family encourages frugality. After a while, certain projects just happen to crop up where you least expect it.

So it should come as no surprise that eventually it came time to change the rain gutters. By the time Dad was finished, we still had a few extra feet of unused gutter, so Mom decided to put it to good use. I still wish I had taken pictures of her gutter garden! Regardless, it’s a simple project, and if you’re an engineering student, you can easily adapt this same project for PVC or other materials that are used for your university projects!

The concept is fairly easy. Cap off the ends of the gutters, drill drainage holes, lay down a layer of gravel to encourage drainage, add soil, and add plants. Voila! Your very own gutter garden! It’s also a cost effective project, as gutters aren’t overly expensive and can often be picked up or repurposed from other home improvement projects. But the nifty thing here is what these gardens can be used for.

In the home, they can be hung up on the walls for decoration, or they can be hung up in the kitchen to provide an easy-access herb garden. If hung closer to the ground, catnip can be planted for your feline’s drug-induced pleasure. The possibilities are near-endless!

Because rain gutters are designed to run along roof edges, they can be set up in ways where they curve or turn at an angle. Consider ways in which you can wrap the garden around corners or along walls to create a visually stimulating indoor garden!

How Can I Witch This?

As usual with container gardens, think of ways in which you can bring some magic to the container. Correspond your color with intent, or decorate with sigils, symbols, and crystals! In the gravel layer, add a crystal or two to promote growth, health, and prosperity. Select plants that correspond to your intentions, and place the planters strategically in the home.

Rain gutters are particularly useful for a bit of magic, too! How? Well, consider their purpose. The movement of water around the home to avoid stagnation, and the draining away of excess. Use your rain gutter garden to encourage energy movement in the home, draining away negative energy and encouraging a fresh flow of positive intention!

May Your Harvests Always Be Bountiful! )O(

songsandeyeglasses  asked:

How do you redecorate without breaking your fragile bank account??

I love this question! Everything on this list is under $30, and most of it can be purchased from the safety of your dorm room couch.

Decorating on a Budget

1. Plants: Plants are my personal favorite decor (apart from Xmas lights). They’re inexpensive and look great in any location. If watering a plant every day doesn’t work for your schedule, get a cactus! I water my cacti twice a week.

2. Xmas Lights: I try to distance myself from people who say that Xmas lights are just “seasonal”. I have three different strands of lights up all year long, one in each room and one on my outdoor balcony. These lights are perfect for parties, romantic evenings, etc. 

3. Candles/Incense: Dorm room or apartment landlord permitting, candles and incense really help an apartment feel more homey. They also help stave off the smell of your cat’s litter box, which is always a plus.

4. Posters: Posters aren’t as expensive as you think they are, but poster frames are ridiculously expensive. And you can’t buy the cheap ones, they fall apart instantly- you have to buy the $40 ones. My advice to you, buy posters and hang them up carefully with pushpins or tape.

5. Clocks: Buy a cool clock off Society6 or RedBubble for $25. It’s my belief that the right clock can help brighten up an otherwise dull-looking room. I bought my boyfriend this Bob’s Burgers clock for his birthday last year.

6. Shower: You don’t need to use the low-grade weak shower head that came with your bathroom. You can buy color changing shower heads and spa quality shower heads on Amazon for $25. Go forth! Always keep your old shower head somewhere safe, and put it back on when you’re ready to move out. There are lots of great and truly unique shower curtains out there on the internet, but they’re expensive. You’re better off buying one from Target or Walmart.

7. Night lights: I am the sort of person who always needs to pee at 3am. I have always used night lights in my bathroom and kitchen because they’re so much better than blundering around in the dark. Similar to the Xmas lights, they help create that “mood”. I have these cute little lava lamp night lights.

8. Glow in the dark stars: Just trust me on this.

9. Chalkboard paint: Dorm room or apartment landlord permitting, chalkboard paint can help turn your room into a perpetual canvas. A friend of mine from college did this to his incredibly small room, and it looked so good.

10. Beaded curtain: Beaded curtains help make small spaces appear larger. We have a beaded curtain hanging in our hallway currently, and it’s great. You don’t need a super expensive one that was handmade by the indigenous people of wherever. Just a simple one to put in a doorway or hang on the wall to change your space.

budget/healthy vegan grocery list & meal planning

so I do shopping for a house of 4, and one of the people I live with has type 2 diabetes. So I thought I’d share the types of things I get that are both healthy and cost effective.


Breakfast

  • Instant oatmeal (we buy sugar free brown sugar flavor, but you can also just buy a big tin of instant oatmeal and add stevia or sugar free maple syrup and cinnamon+allspice)
  • Bananas (good to add in oatmeal)
  • Cereal and a milk alternative (most cereals besides kellogs are vegan, try to find a cereal and milk that’s fortified with b12)
  • French toast (mash a banana with either 3/4c milk alternative or the juice from a can of chickpeas, then add a tsp vanilla, 1-2tsp cinnamon, and ¼ tsp allspice. dip bread in mixture on both sides and then fry in a pan with 1 tbsp butter/coconut oil/nonstick spray on high heat and fry till desired on both sides. makes about 6 slices and is super good topped with syrup!)
  • Tofu scramble with toast (to make tofu scramble add onion powder, garlic powder, salt, pepper, nutritional yeast and break up the tofu in a skillet with a fork and heat it up) goes great with a side of baked beans too


Lunch

  • sweet potato and beans (microwave sweet potato 6-9 minutes depending on size, rinse beans and microwave for 1-2 minutes and then season both the beans and sweet potato however you like!)
  • chickpea salad sandwich (microwave 1/2c chickpeas for about 25 seconds, then mash them with a fork and add 1 tbsp hummus, garlic powder, onion powder, dill weed, parsley all to taste and 1-2tsp spicy brown mustard) tomato slices are a good addition
  • Veggie hummus wrap (buy cauliflower and broccoli by the head, it’s cheaper. Spread hummus on a tortilla. Chop up cauliflower, broccoli, and carrots(or veggies of choice) and assemble the wrap)


Dinner

  • Burritos (microwave instant brown rice to instructions, then add hummus and salsa. microwave beans and season as desired. assemble burrito with rice, lettuce, beans, and guacamole(optional). It’s even better if you turn a skillet on high and grill the tortilla first and assemble the burrito in the skillet, then slide it onto a plate once it’s nice and browned on the outside and wrap it up! Takes maybe 2 minutes extra to do this but it’s so worth it)
  • Curried veggies with rice (I just microwave frozen veggies and then add them to whatever curry I’m making. Walmart carries a “golden curry” that comes in a shiny box and dissolves in water to make a thick curry sauce. But there are tons of other options for curry sauce out there!)
  • Soups like progresso (their tomato basil soup, garden vegetable, lentil soup are vegan just double check the labels!) Campbell’s condensed tomato soup is also vegan. It’s also really good to add some cooked rice to tomato soup!


Snacks

  • Cauliflower/fresh veggies or rice cakes with hummus
  • Popcorn (tons of “buttery” microwave popcorns are vegan. But you can also buy a jar of popcorn kernels, paper bags, and add 1c of kernels with a tiny bit of olive oil to it and fold the top of the bag so it doesn’t open and microwave for 1-2 minutes or until kernels have mostly stopped popping, then add salt and/or nutritional yeast!)
  • Canned fruit or fresh fruit that’s in season/on sale
  • Apples or oranges (buy them by the bag)

I’m sure there’s things I’m missing and I know this list isn’t super extensive but this is what we’ve been keeping in the house recently for dietary reasons while also being concious of our low budget. I’ll add more if I think of anything but feel free to ask questions or add to this list!


Being poor while trying to eat healthy can be a challenge, but it isn’t necessarily impossible either.

The Dollar Tree

Is YOUR best friend if you have a small budget.

They carry Most of your Basic needs and other stuff too.

Soap/ Body wash (Men, Women and Kids)

Deodorant (Men and Women)

Lotion  (Men, Women and Kids)

Toothpaste, Toothbrushes, Floss,  Mouth Wash 

Razors (Men and Women)

Face Wash, Acne Wash and Acne products

Feminine Hygiene products( Pads, Tampons, Feminine wash, wipes, spray and douche.) 

Condoms, warming jelly, tests.

Medicine/ Vitamins/ Cough Drops

Socks, pantyhose, tights, t shirts, scarves, house shoes, baby clothing. 

Wash Cloths, bath rugs, bath sponges

Other bath products and organizers.

Kids Toys

School supplies

Makeup, combs, brushes, shampoo, conditioner, hair color, hair oils and gels.

Perfume, Cologne, Body Sprays (Men and Women)

Frozen Food, Canned Food, Snacks, Juice, Milk, Eggs, Cheese, Soda

Food organizing, food spices, food utensils 

Room Spray

Toilet paper, Paper Towels, plunges. 

Laundry Detergent, Dryer Sheets, dirty laundry containers, hangers, moth balls. 

Trash Bags

Cleaners (Room, Floor and Kitchen)

Pet Food, Pet Supplies, Pet Toys

Home Decoration, Crafts, Books, DVD’s, Cell Phone Chargers/ Cases,Gift Ideas and much more.

 THEY ALSO TAKE BRAND COUPONS!!!

Dollar Tree should be your VERY Best Friend if you are on a small monthly budget… or just like getting good deals.

anonymous asked:

Hello, I'm the anon who's freaking out about being thrown into adulthood, and thank you for your previous help. 1.) How do I mamage/budget a minimum wage salary? 2.) I've never been great with any sort of organization, but would you mind teaching me about home organization and important paper organization?

Okay, so this post will be about budgeting on minimum wage, and later in the day I will also post about paper organization. Enjoy!

Budgeting on Minimum Wage

Overview

The average minimum wage in the US is $7.25/hr. Even working full time at 40 hours a week, that’s only a profit of $290 before taxes. This is not a fair living wage! You are worth way more than this amount! I strongly encourage you to start looking for another job that pays better, look for something around the $10-$15 range. 

While $7.25 is atrocious, thousands of people around the world support families on much less. If they can do it while supporting children, so can you! To live off a minimum wage budget you need to declare yourself independent. If your parents are still claiming you as a dependent YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO DO THIS. I also recommend that you have the highest amount possible taken out of your taxes so that you get money back from your state at the end of the year, instead of being in debt to them.

What I’ve done is come up with a budgeting plan based off some made up factors and my own personal experience.

Housing

1. City life. Forget about the city! Apartments located in cities can be three times as expensive as apartments in small towns or villages. On top of the extra expense, they’re much smaller and have less amenities included. I’d much rather live in a one bedroom apartment with a dishwasher and a conveniently located Laundromat, than a literal closet with no windows on a fifth floor walkup. Look for apartments twenty minutes to a half hour outside of your closest city. Now you have the close conveniences of a city, with none of those pesky city prices that your budget can’t handle.

2. College towns. Shop around and look at apartments by local colleges. Large colleges with have apartment complexes within walking distance of the school grounds. Landlords know that college students have less money (you might even be a college student yourself) and adjust their prices accordingly. Even apartments next to ivy league schools are priced this way, so don’t be discouraged by the institution’s “prestige”.

3. Locale. Your safety is more important than your bank account. It doesn’t matter if you live in Section 8 housing or in an affluent suburb. Some apartment complexes and neighborhoods are just safer than others. I live in a heavily populated and upper middle class suburb, and the first year I moved in, a drunk woman tried to throw a beer bottle at my car. Thankfully this is the only time this happened to me, but it made me feel unsafe in my environment. Before signing a lease, walk or drive around your prospective home’s neighborhood at night. Take in the atmosphere, and make sure it’s one where you could comfortably run to the local supermarket at 10:30pm and pick up toilet paper.

4. Roommates. Living on minimum wage requires that you find one or two roommates to help split the rent. The more the better! Get together with your more responsible friends, so at least you’re living with people whose company you enjoy. There are lots of “roommate wanted” forums and message boards for you to browse on the internet, but always bring a responsible adult with you before meeting a stranger. Please. Bring your mom if you have too.

Food

1. Low-spoon food. I created this post a few months ago which offers lots of suggestions about cooking and shopping on a budget.

2. Online recipes. Here are some of my favorite online Tumblr cookbook resources. 

3. I also regularly update my cooking on a budget tag. 

Misc Expenses

1. Gas. Shop around and find the cheapest gas in your area. Avoid gas stations next to colleges, highways, and in touristy areas. Look into getting as gas rewards card from your favorite supermarket. I get 10 cents off a gallon with Stop & Shop every time I do a big shop. 

2. Dollar store. Get to know your local dollar and bargain stores. You can buy everything from pots and pans to bed sheets there. These stores often sell bulk ramen for $1 and large cans of crushed tomatoes for 75 cents. That’s enough food for you to live off of for several days. When shopping, I make three grocery store stops to ensure that I spend the least amount possible on my pantry needs. I go Dollar Store, Stop and Shop, and then to my local organic grocery store. I’m going to make a list of things that I buy at Dollar Stores and things that I don’t buy at Dollar Stores soon!

3. Cable. We are living in the digital age- you don’t need cable television. Use Netflix or Hulu or whatever. It will save you tons of $$. 

4. Internet. As far as internet speed goes, if you’re living with roommates you will probably need a higher speed. Living by yourself, choose a lower one. Most internet companies offer large discounts to new subscribers. These typically only last a year, but will save you serious money. Make sure to take note of when this discount expires, and contact the company before it does. If you don’t, they’ll begin charging you the full amount without notice.

5. Verizon. I just want to take a moment to talk about how much I love Verizon because they have literally saved me so much money in the three years I’ve been with them. After you sign a contract with a new internet company, they charge you a bunch of ridiculous fees like “activation fees” and “installation fees”. I called Verizon and was like “I’m a poor college student, I can’t afford this” and they were like “don’t worry, we’ll waive the fee”. I signed a two year contract with them that saved me $80 on a high-speed internet bill per month (my price being only 50.99 a month). After the contract expired I call them and they put me on a month to month, keeping the price absolutely the same. TLDR- get Verizon if you can.

6. Utility. Get on a monthly budget with whatever utility company services your new apartment. Although it may seem like the cheaper option, paying the actual amount of electricity you spend per month is the more expensive. It’s also unpredictable, and a minimum wage budget won’t allow for it. See this for more info.

7. Amazon. I buy a lot of my beauty, cleaning, and cat products online. Amazon offers Prime shipping free for a year with a student email address, and then offers it at a greatly reduced price after the year. If you are a student, snap up that free deal ASAP. If it’s in your budget, I’d greatly recommend investing in Amazon Prime.

8. Saving money. It’s so important to attempt to break way from the “paycheck to paycheck” vicious cycle. Living this way does not allow for emergency expense money, and trust me, sometime soon you will need emergency expense money. Your cat might get sick or your car may die, whatever it is, it’s always smart to have at least $500 squirreled away. I’m gonna level with you, things have been tight for my budget and I haven’t been able to save anything for the past three months. But this month I will!

Example Budgets

Full Time

Working with the $7.25/hr and 40hr/week model, here’s an example budget for living on minimum wage. That’s $1,160 a month without taxes.

Housing: Let’s say you’re sharing an apartment with two close friends, the rent being $1,500 without any amenities. That rent split three ways is $500 each.

Gas I commute twenty minutes every day, and I drop about $20-$25 a week on gas. That’s $100 on gas a month.

Food: I do one big shopping a month with my boyfriend. We drop around $180 and that’s including toiletries and soap and stuff. So maybe you’ll spend about $100 a month on all your shopping needs.

Cable/internet:  Hopefully you took my advice and skipped cable. Let’s say you’re paying around $50 per month for internet. Split three ways that’s $17 each.

Laundry: Hopefully you’re not like me and are only spending around $20 on laundry per month.

Random expenses: Because there always are some. Let’s just tack on another $100.

With everything added up, you still have around $290 left before taxes! That money can go into a savings account, and after several months, you’ll have that $500 worth of emergency money saved.

Part Time

Working with the $7.25/hr and 25hr/week model, here’s an example budget for living on minimum wage. That’s $725 without taxes.

Housing: In this case, you need to look for apartments in the $800-900 range. In my area, one bedroom apartments go for around $1000, so you may need to get creative with your roommate (I don’t think you could have more than one roommate in this situation). Buy dividers to split the bedroom or studio in half! Let’s say your rent is $850 with nothing included, that’s $425 each.

Gas You’re still looking at a large gas bill per month, so it may be more inexpensive to ride a bike or use public transportation. Let’s say you use public transportation, and spend around $50 a month on that. Or maybe you and your roommate can split gas expenses and share a car?

Food: Pinch those pennies! Use some of those budget cookbooks I linked above to help you cook healthy and delicious meals for under $4 each. See if you can only spend $80 a month on groceries.

Cable/internet:  Hopefully you took my advice and skipped cable. Let’s say you’re paying around $50 per month for internet. Split two ways is $25 each.

Laundry: Hopefully you’re not like me and are only spending around $20 on laundry per month.

Random expenses: Because there always are some. Let’s just tack on another $100.

That leaves you $25 to put in your bank account, if that. This is a paycheck to paycheck situation, and you will probably need to get another source of income to feel secure. But you can still do it!