buddhist boy

Originally posted by neonearthtone

A spell for cutting off toxic friends and making amazing friends! 🔮

I decided to combine some asks I had about spells for friendships!! Make sure you move on from bad friends as you deserve better.

You’ll need:

🌙 A black candle and a yellow candle

🌙 Rosemary

🌙 A jar/sachet

🌙 A pen and paper

🌙 A nail or safety pin

🌙 Rose quartz

🌙 Jasmine incense


Method:

🌙 Start by meditating and drawing your circle! Call on any deities you like.

🌙 Now, light the yellow candle, the black candle and the jasmine incense.

🌙 Write on the paper all the traits you would like in a friend. Remember to be specific! You could also draw the rune for wunjo (below) on the back of the paper.

🌙 Pass the rose quartz, rosemary, and paper through the incense smoke and place them in the jar/sachet. Pass the nail through but instead keep it out.

🌙 Now take the nail or safety pin. If using a sachet, thread it through the top and dip the sharp side in the black candle wax. If using a jar, you could either tape it on the bottom of the lid after dipping it in the wax, or push it through the cork depending on the type of jar you used. This will act as a barrier against toxic friendships.

🌙 If you used a jar, you can seal the top with the yellow wax. Otherwise just leave the sachet as it is. Feel free to pass the whole thing through the incense again.

🌙 You’re done! With the sachet, you can carry it around or put it under your pillow. Same with a tiny jar. If a big jar, place it under or next to your bed or even in your bag. Expect new, better friendships!

Some tips!!

🌙 You can’t make new friends if you keep your old, shitty ones. Take your chance to leave them and don’t look back no matter what, even if it’s tempting!

🌙 Also, if the gemstones are too big for a small jar, I’ve totally hit mine with a shovel in my garden to make them fit lmao.

flickr

Little monk by Patrick Foto ;)
Via Flickr:
Little monk walking at old temple, Salay Bagan Myanmar

CHILDREN OF THE WORLD / BHUTAN - As I travel around the world on various assignments, I never tire of taking photos of children. Not only are they so picturesque as only children can be, but they also represent a hope in them that can’t be found in any other type of images. In their joys and in their despair, in their riches and in their poverty, my heart goes out to them. I want to lift them up to the word and shout, “Look, this is the future! The future is in their hands!” I sometimes wonder, though, what kind of future will they have … These two young novice monks were outside of the Punakha Dzong in Bhutan. Bhutan’s dzongs are ancient fortress-like monastic and administrative centers scattered cross the country. The full name of this one is the Pungtang Dechen Photrang Dzong (meaning “very awesome dzong the palace of great happiness or bliss.”) I always have mixed feelings whenever I see young monks like this. They are very picturesque! But at the same time I wonder what kind of life they live, given to monastic orders by their families, oftentimes to incur spiritual favor. The monastic system is very strong in Bhutan, and Buddhist monks are highly respected.

NEPAL, Kathmandu : A group of Nepalese Buddhist boys pose as they attend Bratabandha, a coming-of-age ceremony in Kathmandu on March 5, 2014. In Newari culture of the Shakya caste, the heads of young boys are shaved and they wear a dress of a monk during the Bratabandha ceremony, which combines chudakarma and upanayana, among the hill communities of Nepal. AFP PHOTO/Prakash MATHEMA

A group of Nepalese Buddhist boys pose as they attend Bratabandha, a coming-of-age ceremony in Kathmandu. In Newari culture of the Shakya caste, the heads of young boys are shaved and they wear a dress of a monk during the Bratabandha ceremony, which combines chudakarma and upanayana, among the hill communities of Nepal

Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images