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Little monk by Patrick Foto ;)
Via Flickr:
Little monk walking at old temple, Salay Bagan Myanmar

CHILDREN OF THE WORLD / BHUTAN - As I travel around the world on various assignments, I never tire of taking photos of children. Not only are they so picturesque as only children can be, but they also represent a hope in them that can’t be found in any other type of images. In their joys and in their despair, in their riches and in their poverty, my heart goes out to them. I want to lift them up to the word and shout, “Look, this is the future! The future is in their hands!” I sometimes wonder, though, what kind of future will they have … These two young novice monks were outside of the Punakha Dzong in Bhutan. Bhutan’s dzongs are ancient fortress-like monastic and administrative centers scattered cross the country. The full name of this one is the Pungtang Dechen Photrang Dzong (meaning “very awesome dzong the palace of great happiness or bliss.”) I always have mixed feelings whenever I see young monks like this. They are very picturesque! But at the same time I wonder what kind of life they live, given to monastic orders by their families, oftentimes to incur spiritual favor. The monastic system is very strong in Bhutan, and Buddhist monks are highly respected.

NEPAL, Kathmandu : A group of Nepalese Buddhist boys pose as they attend Bratabandha, a coming-of-age ceremony in Kathmandu on March 5, 2014. In Newari culture of the Shakya caste, the heads of young boys are shaved and they wear a dress of a monk during the Bratabandha ceremony, which combines chudakarma and upanayana, among the hill communities of Nepal. AFP PHOTO/Prakash MATHEMA

A group of Nepalese Buddhist boys pose as they attend Bratabandha, a coming-of-age ceremony in Kathmandu. In Newari culture of the Shakya caste, the heads of young boys are shaved and they wear a dress of a monk during the Bratabandha ceremony, which combines chudakarma and upanayana, among the hill communities of Nepal

Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images