buddhism books

We were told how Buddhists did not pray but only meditated, and there was an actual skeleton in the cupboard to encourage meditation on the transiency of life. We were also told about the precepts which lay people take at the moon’s quarters. I was greatly impressed by the fact that they were sensible ones, like not telling untruths, instead of ones about not committing murder towards which I had never had the least inclination.
—  Marie Byles, Journey Into Burmese Silence
The Tao Summarized: 5.5) A Point of Relativity

The Tao Summarized: 5.5) The Point of Relativity

All philosophical writers have the same goal: to describe the world as thoroughly as they can.

All philosophers have one thing in common: They all fail to completely achieve their goal.

What that means in useful terms is that no school of philosophy has all of the right answers, while at the same time almost every school of philosophy has SOME of the right answers.

An attempt to get a complete…

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loganfiasco asked:

What do you read to aid your understanding of self, growth and quest for wisdom if I may ask. I'm inspired by your depth of reflection.

I haven’t really read anything if I’m honest it’s more observation and personal reading I read a book modern Buddhism that made me understand more about how we attach ourselves too much to things and people and it ruined our inner peace and happiness that kind of helped but this is me mostly just free styling and observing x

Love and Compassion in the Visuddhimagga  A Conversation with Maria Heim

http://www.bcbsdharma.org/insight-journal/?utm_source=BCBS+Insight+Journal+May+3%2C+2015&utm_campaign=IJ+May+3%2C+2015&utm_medium=email                                          Join Maria at BCBS this June 13 for her day-long course.Maria Heim is Professor of Buddhist Studies in the Religion Department at Amherst College, MA. She specializes in Pāli Buddhism, and her recent book is entitled The Forerunner of All Things: Buddhaghosa on Mind, Intention, and Agency. She is currently working on a book on emotions in premodern South Asian texts and a second book on interpreting the Buddha’s words. She will teach a course titled Love and Compassion in the Visuddhimagga at BCBS on June 13.

anonymous asked:

ally i really want to get into crystals but i don't know where to begin, any ideas?? xx

I’d recommend heading into your closest spiritual shop, one that has books on buddhism, yoga, veganism, holistic health, meditiation etc and also crystals! The people working there will be able to tell you a little about each of their properties, and there may even be some handy brochures or books. If you don’t have any stores like that nearby, hop onto a website like this that explains the metaphysical properties of stones:

http://www.crystalvaults.com/crystal-encyclopedia/crystal-guide

Google and YouTube are probably good places to explore too!

Mindfulness

The book I read to research this post was Mindfulness: How To Stop Worrying Richard Carroll which is a very good book that I bought from kindle. This book is only around 30 pages so is quite short. Minfulness was originally used by Taoists and gradually students studying meditation and yoga. It is good for coping with many kinds of stress related illness like depression and anxiety. It can also…

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What would a selfless spirit of healthful heartfelt goodness be like?

Quite humbly and respectfully, I am speaking of the ‘spirit’ with which one goes about doing what one does…one’s demeanor or mien. In my ages-old arts it is coined as ‘shen.’ Again, “what would a selfless spirit of healthful heartfelt goodness be like?” Would it be light and free, yet full of dignity, decency, goodness, and grace? Would its selflessness be consistent with resplendently…

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katieloveslace asked:

Hi! You said you're done and I totally understand, but when you're feeling a bit better, could you tell me wtf dark buddhism is????????

I’m calmer now :)

Anyway, Dark Buddhism is both a book and a philosophy. The philosophy melds Zen Buddhism, Objectivism, and psychology to create an understanding of the world that doesn’t really accurately reflect any of the three. From Buddhism, the author takes meditation and a belief in impermanence, but rejects the doctrine of no-self and the importance of compassion; from Objectivism, the author takes morality, the existence of the self, and A is A, but rejects the static view of the world and the belief that one can control everything that happens to oneself; and from psychology (although I’m a bit hazy on this), the author takes the importance of self-esteem and (again) the idea of self.

Zen and Objectivism are the two most important aspects; psychology serves as a check on both of them, keeping them grounded to empirical evidence.

The meaning/purpose of life in Dark Buddhism is happiness, which is expressed thus:

There are two types of happiness, and each reflects a respective pillar of Dark Buddhism. First from traditional Buddhism, happiness comes from within. Happiness is being completely at peace and in harmony with life, the universe, and everything. It is very much being part of the “flow” of the universe without particular attachments, either attachments to the past or present or material attachments. The second form of happiness is the more material kind of happiness, which we in the West are more familiar with and which jibes with Ayn Rand’s Objectivist ideals. This is happiness in one’s accomplishments, it is happiness in the arms of your lover, and it is happiness when you get recognition at work for a job well done. This form of happiness is externally based-even when the happiness is derived from the self, it is how the self acts and interacts with respect to the external world.

Free Kindle Book - [Religion & Spirituality][Free] Zen Buddhism: A Beginner's Guide Book On Achieving A Healthy And Happy Life Through Zen: Find Peace Through Zen and Discover The Ultimate Happiness (Zen - Meditation - Buddhism - Mindfulness Books 1)

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Free Kindle Book - [History][Free] Buddhism: A Beginners Guide Book For True Self Discovery and Living A Balanced and Peaceful Life: Learn To Live in The Now and Find Peace From Within - ... - Buddha / Buddhist Books By Sam Siv 1)

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BUDDHIST ARTIFACTS AS THE SUPPORT OF SPIRITUAL REALIZATION

I WOULD LIKE TO SAY a few words abut the significance of Buddhist art in Tibet. As you might know, in Tibetan art most of the artifacts are representations of Buddhist teachings. Tibetans regard them as objects of homage and sources of inspiration and for making merit, but not as materials to decorate their homes. For Tibetans, the sacredness of the religious objects is so profound that when I was in my teens, my teacher used to tell us, “When you are examining or looking at an image, you are not supposed to think or say, ‘this is a good image or this is a bad image,’ but you are supposed to think or say, 'the artist was skilled or not skilled,’ otherwise you are grading a sacred object as if it were an ordinary object.” Their respect for and devotion to religious representations arc not just a cultural or intellectual response, but a deep-rooted feeling and a spontaneous expression from the heart.

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