buchenwald

Today is the International Holocaust Remembrance Day. On January 27 1945, the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp was liberated by Soviet troops.

The above image shows just some of the thousands upon thousands of wedding rings confiscated by the Nazis from victims of the Holocaust. These rings were found by US troops after liberating Buchenwald in 1945.

(Department of Defense)

2

The Liberation of Buchenwald.

On 11th April 1945, American forces liberated the prison camp at Buchenwald, Germany. 

It was estimated that nearly 57,000 prisoners (mostly Jews) perished in Buchenwald during its eight-year existence as a Nazi concentration camp.

  •  Free Inmates of the concentration camp Buchenwald near Weimar, Germany, march to receive treatment at an American hospital after the camp is liberated by General Patton’s 3rd U.S. Army troops, in April 1945.
  •  Survivors gaze at photographer Margaret Bourke-White and rescuers from the United States Third Army during the liberation of Buchenwald, April 1945.
The story of how you met: a study in scarlet

In a way, Anderson was right; the case of Hope—Jefferson, Jeff the cabbie, and Sherrindford—was about revenge. Rache, German for revenge; Rachel, it’s not a name. If we are to begin from the beginning, the real beginning, a study in scarlet shall be conducted then. Scarlet as in red, in blood, and in Rache i.e. all things German.

I’ve noted in several of my meta posts that series 4 was about the past – events that happened but certain details went unnoticed or seemed inconsequential at the time. Reality perceived differently, or perhaps, incomplete. Pink, a lighter shade of red. A Study in Pink, the pink lady, Jeff Hope, Moriarty; A Study in Scarlet, the lady in red, Culverton Smith, Faith? No. Eurus? No.

Scarlet. Roses are Red. Rosamund?

It has always been about John Watson. Ever since day one.

Keep reading

Tears of a concentration camp survivor on 68th anniversary of Buchenwald liberation where Nazis killed 56,000 men 

With tears in his eyes as he holds roses in his left hand, Petro Mischtschuk poignantly stands on the grounds of a Second World War concentration camp where more than 50,000 people lost their lives.

The 87-year-old Ukrainian survivor of the appalling Buchenwald yesterday laid flowers at a ceremony marking the 68th anniversary of the liberation of the camp outside Weimar, eastern Germany.

Jews, non-Jewish Poles and Slovenes, religious and political prisoners, Roma and Sinti, Jehovah’s Witnesses, criminals, homosexuals, and prisoners of war died in the camp between 1937 and 1945.

(Source: The Daily Mail)

Today in history: April 11, 1945 - Prisoners at the Nazis’ Buchenwald concentration camp rise up inside the camp and liberate the camp.

Led by the communists imprisoned there, they forced the Nazis who ran the camp to flee. This was the only Nazi concentration camp where the prisoners liberated the camp themselves. When U.S. troops arrived shortly thereafter, they found the communist concentration camp survivors in control of the camp. For years leading up to that time, communist prisoners and other prisoners from many countries formed an underground resistance inside the camp that was united into a Popular Front Committee.

(image: Sculpture erected in 1958 by East Germany at Buchenwald commemorating the resistance to the Nazis inside the concentration camp.)

Via Freedom Road Socialist Organization (Fight Back!)