bucephalus

Rare Coin with Alexander the Great’s Horse, Bucephalus, Struck in 281 BC

Excessively rare, less than ten examples are known of this Greek silver tetradrachm of King Seleukos I Nikator. This coin, minted in Pergamon, shows what is believed to be the horned image of the mighty warhorse of Alexander the Great, Bucephalus. The reverse is inscribed BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ΣEΛEYKOY with an elephant walking to the right, a bee above and an anchor below.  

This coin was only struck for a brief period of time. It is thought that the issue was a commemorative one, struck to mark the victory of Seleukos I over Lysimachos at the battle of Corupedium. The horse on the obverse of the coin is perhaps a reference to Alexander’s own mount, Bucephalus. A huge horse and thought to be untameable, it is reported by Plutarch that Alexander won Bucephalus when he was a thirteen-year-old boy after he subdued it, and that only he was able to ride the animal. There are contradictory accounts of the fate of Bucephalus, some stating that he died of natural causes, and others that he perished following the battle of Hydaspes in 326 BC.

An alternative interpretation of the obverse of this coin could be a commemoration of the horse that enabled Seleukos’s flight from Babylon in 316 BC. The addition of the horns to the horse signifies that it is an heroic animal. The elephant that appears on the reverse of the coin was a symbol of Seleucid might, in use since the reconquest of India in 304-303 BC.

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2/19 Goofus the Peacock sneaks home after flying next door to court the neighbor’s blind horse with his shiny butt and fancy dancing again.

I am going to be kind of annoyed if he manages to father any man-eating horses with peacock tails, which I am assured are totally a thing by Very Accurate Medieval Biology Texts That Were Definitely Not Written On A Dare, and then I get eaten by a very fancy horse.

It’s spring, when a young peacock’s fancy lightly turns to thoughts of unleashing anthrophagous monstrosities upon a soft and sleepy world.

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Bucephalus

Bucephalus or Bucephalas (Ancient Greek: Βουκέφαλος or Βουκεφάλας, from βούς bous, “ox” and κεφαλή kephalē, “head” meaning “ox-head”) (c. 355 BC – June 326 BC) was the horse of Alexander the Great, and one of the most famous actual horses of antiquity. Ancient accounts state that Bucephalus died after the Battle of the Hydaspes in 326 BC, in what is now modern Pakistan, and is buried in Jalalpur Sharif outside of Jhelum, Pakistan. Another account states that Bucephalus is buried in Phalia, a town in Pakistan’s Mandi Bahauddin District, which is named after him. The value which Alexander placed on Bucephalus emulated his hero and supposed ancestor Achilles, who claimed that his horses were “known to excel all others—for they are immortal. Poseidon gave them to my father Peleus, who in his turn gave them to myself." source | edit.

Bucephalus or Bucephalas (c. 355 BC – June 326 BC) was Axelander the Great’s horse and one of the most famous actual horses of antiquity. Ancient accounts state that Bucephalus died after the Battle of the Hydaspes in 326 BC, in what is now modern Pakistan, and is buried in Jalalpur Sharif outside of Jhelum, Pakistan. Another account states that Bucephalus is buried in Phalia, a town in Pakistan’s Mandi Bahauddin District, which is named after him.