buccal cavity

youtube
  • fistula 瘻孔 ろうこう
  • gastric juice 胃液 いえき
  • oral cavity 口腔 こうくう 
  • buccal cavity 頬側口腔 きょうそくこうくう,
  • hard palate 硬口蓋 こうこうがい
  • soft palate 軟口蓋 なんこうがい
  • uvula 口蓋垂 こうがいすい
    • (the colloquial term is 喉ちんこ のどちんこ)
  • nasopharynx 鼻咽頭 びいんとう
  • nasal cavity 鼻腔 びくう
  • teeth
    • incisor 門歯 もんし or 切歯 せっし
    • canine 犬歯 けんし
    • premolar 小臼歯 しょうきゅうし
    • molar 臼歯 きゅうし or 大臼歯 だいきゅうし
      • (the chemical term is molar モル濃度 もるのうど)
  • masticate 噛み砕く かみくだく
  • bolus 食塊 しょっかい
  • parotid gland 耳下腺 じかせん
  • sublingual gland 舌下腺 ぜっかせん
  • submandibular gland 顎下腺 がっかせん
  • saliva 唾液 だえき
    • salivary amylase 唾液アミラーゼ
  • gastric pit 胃小窩 いしょうか
  • gastric gland 胃腺 いせん
  • secretory cell 分泌細胞 ぶんぴつさいぼう
  • parietal cell 壁細胞 へきさいぼう
  • hydrochloric acid 塩酸 えんさん 
  • denature 変性させる へんせいさせる
  • pepsinogen ペプシノーゲン
  • chief cell 主細胞 しゅさいぼう
  • pepsin ペプシン
  • enteroendocrine cell 腸管内分泌細胞 ちょうかんないぶんぴさいぼう or 腸内分泌細胞 ちょうないぶんぴさいぼう
  • regulatory hormone 調節ホルモン ちょうせつホルモン
    • serotonin セロトニン
    • histamine ヒスタミン
    • somatostatin ソマトスタチン
  • G cell G細胞 じーさいぼう
  • gastrin ガストリン
  • cephalic phase 脳相 のうそう or 頭相 とうそう
  • gastric phase 胃相 いそう
  • reflex arc 反射弓 はんしゃきゅう
  • intestinal phase 腸相 ちょうそう
  • chyme 粥状液 かゆじょうえき or 消化粥 しょうかがゆ or 糜粥 びじゅく
  • vomit 嘔吐 おうと
It is by no means certain that horses connect pressure in the mouth with the rider.  They have not evolved to expect that another animal can apply pressure to the inside of the buccal cavity via a piece of metal.  This cognitive aspect may account for the apparent tolerance (or habituation) horses show when allowing heavy handed riders to mount them time after time.  It is therefore unnecessary and inappropriate to complicate a rider’s interventions by giving them anthropomorphic labels, such as ‘asking’ (e.g asking the horse to lower its head), ‘encouraging’ (e.g. using the inside leg to encourage forward movement) and 'supporting’ (e.g. applying the outside rein to support the impulsion).  It may be the intention to use words that are common in everyday usage and convey an attitude of cooperation rather than supremacy, but the abiding problem with the use of an anthropomorphic framework to explain rider-horse interactions is that it can disguise and justify abuse of horses that offer undesirable responses, even though these may have been accidentally induced/trained by humans.  So, most horses benefit when science provides mechanistic explanations of equitation, even though some horse people argue that this is undermining the bond they share with their horses (McGreevy, 2007).
—  Paul McGreevy & Andrew Mclean ~ Equitation Science