brown-brogues

6

Everyday Holtzmann

How to create a Jillian Holtzmann inspired capsule wardrobe


When I saw Ghostbusters: Answer the Call for the first time earlier this year, I fell in love with Jillian Holtzmann very quickly for a number of reasons. One of these reasons was her sense of style; she always looks so incredibly interesting and cool, and I knew I wanted to try and absorb some of a her quirky choices into my own wardrobe. I’ve posted a few ‘Holtzmann-inspired’ outfits and so far the response has been pretty positive. I’ve been working on creating a ‘capsule wardrobe’ in the style of Holtzmann - a capsule wardrobe is a collection of around 25 items of clothing which follow a similar style/colour scheme, and so can be combined in many different ways to create multiple different outfits. I know there are a lot of fans out there who have similar goals, and so I’ve decided to post my own collection as a kind of guide, which you’ll find under the cut below.

Keep reading

8

Like the creamy latte I drank from the soft moist breasts attached to your mum as she purred like a cat these lovely lil mocha brown and white brogues are awesome. I combined this outfit to look a little dandy and eccentric but ended up looking like I was going to start a Barber Shop Quartet. But unlike almost all Quartets I threw a little black in the colour mix to shake things up a little. A bit like the civil rights movement in Murica, shake things up a little bit for the better. And if you think me comparing dying my shoes to the struggle of the civil rights movement was bad then you should read my other reviews. But white privilege aside I do think the black stripe mirrored the black strip in my panama rather well along with a similar colour running through my heart and soul…

today’s assessment centre day ensemble consisted of this grey blazer, this blue shirt, grey checkered trousers (out of view of the camera, evidently) and these swanky brown suede brogue type shoes that i bought (out of view of the camera, too, evidently).

the look was completed with a side of ‘i really need a frigging nap right about now’.

What to Buy Your Man for Valentine’s Day

24 ways to show your loved one just how much you love him

The most romantic day of the year is less than two weeks away and rather than waiting until the last minute to get him something special, order him an outstanding gift online today. If you’re not sure what to get your significant other, you’ve come to the right place! Below are ten gifts ideas we know he’ll love. From awesome backpacks to everyday coats, scroll through 24 of our favorite Valentine’s a Day gifts for men.

Backpack

Coated-canvas and leather backpack

Backpack

Little America Nylon & Leather Backpack

Shoes

Thom Browne Wingtip Brogue Boot

Nike Free Flyknit Chukka

Suede-Trimmed Marbled Leather and Rubber Sneakers

Jacket

A.P.C. Denim outerwear

KENZO Jacket

ACNE STUDIOS Jacket

Scent

“Bergamote 22” perfume oil

Artisan Black Gift Set, Eau de Toilette Spray + After Shave Gel

Masculin Pluriel eau de toilette 70ml

Shades

OLIVER PEOPLES wafer sunglasses

Grey Wood Grain Sunglasses

Men’s Grey Round TB-011 Sunglasses

Watch

Philip Stein Chronograph Active Watch, 46mm

BN0024 in Brown

‘Ancher’ Perforated Leather Strap Watch, 40mm

Scarf 

ISSEY MIYAKE striped pleated scarf

Paul Smith Scarves - Red And Ecru Striped Wool-Mohair Scarf

Diamond-print silk scarf

Bracelet

X ALL_BLUES Men’s Oxidised Silver Bangle

Silver Bolt Cuff Bracelet

Nantucket Bracelet



independent.co.uk
Soldier of fortune: Tom Hiddleston is set to become 2012's hottest new
Twelve months ago, only fans of the BBC show Wallander or maybe those who saw him in Joanna Hogg's film Unrelated would've picked Tom Hiddleston out of a crowd. The past year has rather changed matters. Rarely, if ever, has a British actor made such an impression so swiftly – working back-to-back with Kenneth Branagh, Woody Allen, Terence Davies and now Steven Spielberg, he has not so much made a breakthrough as smashed his way into the public consciousness with all the force of a wrecking ball.

Twelve months ago, only fans of the BBC show Wallander or maybe those who saw him in Joanna Hogg’s film Unrelated would’ve picked Tom Hiddleston out of a crowd. The past year has rather changed matters. Rarely, if ever, has a British actor made such an impression so swiftly – working back-to-back with Kenneth Branagh, Woody Allen, Terence Davies and now Steven Spielberg, he has not so much made a breakthrough as smashed his way into the public consciousness with all the force of a wrecking ball.

Even he can’t quite fathom it. Recently he went back to Rada, where he trained. “Some of the staff wanted me to come back and give dispatches from the front line, to give an illustration of what students might expect on the other side of their training,” he explains. “I sat in this room where I’d practised sword-fights and sonnets and Stanislavsky and it felt like I was there yesterday. And I remember saying, ‘I’m supposed to be sitting in the chairs where you are, listening to Mike Leigh or Michael Sheen or whomever.’ I couldn’t believe I was the person giving the talk.” k

We first meet in a private members’ club in Covent Garden, where Hiddleston and I have been assigned use of the fourth-floor library. Seated on an orange plastic chair, he’s tall, thin and handsome in an angular sort of way. His eyes are a fierce blue and his forehead high, supporting a mop of tight brown curls. The handshake is firm, the dress sense preppy – brown brogues, black jeans, and a navy blazer fitted over a white T-shirt. With his Eton education, he seems quintessentially English, though his father was born in Greenock. “When Scotland played England [at rugby], I would support Scotland with him,” he confides.

Given that he turns 31 next month, it’s not that Hiddleston is particularly young to achieve his successes. It’s just the rapidity of his rise that is so shocking. Much of it can be contributed to Branagh. After Hiddleston played his fellow detective in Wallander, and acted alongside him in a West End production of Chekhov’s Ivanov, Branagh wanted his co-star for Thor, the 2011 Marvel Comics blockbuster that he (rather surprisingly) directed. Hiddleston was earmarked for the role of Loki, the god of mischief in Norse mythology and the film’s main antagonist.

He was brought in by Branagh to read for the role, and when the studio executives saw the audition tape, they went wild. “They said, 'Who is that guy? Why haven’t we heard of him before?’” It was a question the rest of Hollywood has since been asking. Woody Allen got in quickly, writing him a letter to ask him to play F Scott Fitzgerald in his delightful fantasy Midnight in Paris. “I didn’t audition,” says Hiddleston. “I didn’t even know he was making a film. He just said, 'Dear Tom, here’s the script, I’d love you to play the part. We’re shooting in Paris in the summer.’”

Also cast in Terence Davies’ recent Terence Rattigan adaptation The Deep Blue Sea (playing Rachel Weisz’s lover), at the same time, he got the call to meet Spielberg for his new film, the First World War epic War Horse. “I remember going home that night and thinking 'What is happening to my life? How did I get here? I’m about to meet one of my heroes! Don’t fuck it up!’” He didn’t. By the time they finished, Spielberg leant across the table and offered him the film there and then. “I nearly whooped, wept, laughed and cried.” Even his agents were shocked.

Then again, it’s not hard to see what entranced Spielberg. Hiddleston must have seemed perfect for the role of the noble British officer, Captain Nicholls. He may not have any military experience, but it’s in his blood. His paternal grandfather was in the Royal Artillery, while his mother’s father was in the Navy. His own father, a scientist by trade, once ran a company that supplied artificial limbs to soldiers returning from the Falklands. Then there’s his father’s great uncle – the last Tom Hiddleston in the family – who was a sergeant in the British Army before he was killed in action, in 1916.

“I always found the extraordinary loss of life in the First World War very moving,” he says. “I remember learning about it as a very young child, as an eight- or nine-year-old, asking my teachers what poppies were for. Every year the teachers would suddenly wear these red paper flowers in their lapels, and I would say 'What does that mean?’ And in history, the next thing you learnt was that there was this terrible, terrible war, from 1914 to 1918, when the country lost an entire generation of young men. And I remember that really affecting me at a very young age.”

As a child, Hiddleston’s “musical instrument of choice” was the trumpet. When he was 12, he was selected at school to play the Last Post on Remembrance Sunday. “I remember feeling the weight of that,” he says. “That I was heralding the two minutes’ silence.” He even told Spielberg that “Americans don’t really understand” the British attitude to the Great War. “It was quite a European war until 1917, when the Americans joined up. They don’t have the same sense of the loss of innocence and the cataclysmic loss of life. A whole generation was wiped out.”

Though on one level an old-fashioned family film, War Horse doesn’t shrink from the reality, with jaw-dropping battle scenes every bit as shocking as Spielberg’s own Saving Private Ryan. Based on the novel by Michael Morpurgo (already the inspiration for a hit play), the story follows a horse bought by a Devon farmer (played by Peter Mullan) and raised by his son Albert (Jeremy Irvine), who names him Joey. When war breaks, the steed is sold to Captain Nicholls – “this agent of separation”, as Hiddleston calls him, “who divorces the horse from his boy”.

Hiddleston plays Nicholls with just the right level of nobility, promising to get Joey back to Albert when the war ends. “Other writers might have made him quite bluff, disciplinarian and possibly cruel. But Michael Morpurgo makes him kindly and decent, upstanding and modest, which I found very moving. That was one of the things that attracted me to the part. Having dug around in so much damage as Loki, here was a man with such a sensitive soul who found himself in uniform, and fighting on the front line.”

Hiddleston will be returning to the “wounded, troubled pain and volatility” of Loki this summer. After watching Thor emerge as one of last summer’s biggest hits (it took $450m globally), he is now the lead villain in The Avengers – which, if you’re a fan of the Marvel Comics universe at least, will be the blockbuster movie to end them all. It pits the all-conquering Loki against the titular posse of superheroes, gathered together from such recent smash-hit films as Iron Man, Captain America and, indeed, Thor.

Not surprisingly, given the exalted company that sort of get-together entails, Hiddleston calls the experience “entirely surreal”. “There was one day when, as Loki, I was sat on some steps, staring at the Avengers in front of me. It would be quite odd just to look at a grouping that involves [such actors as] Robert Downey Jr, Scarlett Johansson, Chris Evans, Samuel L Jackson, Mark Ruffalo, Jeremy Renner and Chris Hemsworth. But the fact that they were dressed in the most outlandish hero costumes was bizarre! And I thought to myself, 'This is the dizzy heights.’”

Still, he must be getting used to this state of disorientation after the year he’s just had. Ask him to put it into words, and he can only talk in clichés. “It all happened so quickly, I’m just concentrating on putting one foot in front of the other,” he tells me. What about fame? Is he worried about losing his anonymity? “I’m trying to cross every bridge when I come to it. I think it would be very dangerous to start planning the date at which I will be unable to go to Sainsbury’s.”

Fortunately, he has a stable upbringing to keep those feet anchored. Born in London, Hiddleston grew up in Wimbledon, the middle child of three (he has an older and younger sister). When he was 10, his parents moved to Oxford, after his father James won a job as managing director of a pharmaceutical biotechnology company with links to the university. “He was really stimulated by being an executive go-between, between these two worlds.”

Before Hiddleston’s mother got pregnant with his elder sister and gave up her work to concentrate on parenthood, she was an arts administrator and casting director for an opera company, having trained as a stage manager. “When I was in my teens, she was always one to suggest possibly going to the Picturehouse [arthouse cinema] rather than the Odeon,” he says. “So she was always peppering my appetite for Jurassic Park and Terminator 2 with an appetite for [Michael Winterbottom’s] Jude or whatever.”

Given this comfortable environment, it’s tempting to look for autobiographical details in Hiddleston’s work. In particular, Archipelago, his second film for Joanna Hogg, a story of upper-middle-class upheaval – or as he puts it, “the implicit tensions and struggles that happen within every family”. His subtle, painful turn as the aimless Edward is arguably his best to date, as the director mined him for information on what it’s like to be a young man of his age. “Joanna asked direct questions: what keeps you up at night? What nags at the corners of your soul in darker moments?”

He may well have thought back to his own family discord, when his parents divorced when he was 12. “It was very difficult and I always say that it made me who I am,” he told one interviewer last year, “because it made me take responsibility for my life and I saw my parents for the first time as human beings, not as perfect love machines. They were both very badly hurt. I mean, it’s hard enough when you’re ending a short-term relationship, isn’t it? I can’t imagine what it’s like to end a 17-year marriage. But I’m so proud of them and I couldn’t do without them and as a result [of the divorce] I have grown-up, intimate relationships with both of them.”

Talking of relationships, there is some confusion I want to clear up with Hiddleston. In the past, it’s been erroneously reported that Hiddleston was secretly married to the actress Susannah Fielding. Already featured in FHM last year, the Hampshire-raised 26-year-old made one of her first screen appearances in an episode of Wallander with Hiddleston back in 2008. Just checking, I say, but are you? “I am definitively not married. That was a big mistake. Don’t know where it came from.” But you are in a relationship right now? “Well, erm, I dunno actually,” he says, shyly. “That’s kind of an awkward answer, isn’t it?”

We leave it at that – after all, Hiddleston is not the sort you find kicking back in the centre pages of OK! magazine, even if his ever-growing circle of female admirers call themselves “Hiddlestoners”.

It was during his school days at Eton that he discovered acting, which he then continued at Cambridge. Reading Classics at Pembroke – the same college that legendary comic Peter Cook went to, he says proudly – he joined the Amateur Dramatic Club. “I love the acting community at Cambridge,” he says. “It’s really quite committed and serious, since the days of Derek Jacobi and Ian McKellen right through to Emma Thompson and Hugh Laurie.”

From Eton to Cambridge and on to Rada sounds as traditional an English education as you could get, I suggest. “In some ways it does and in some ways it doesn’t. Since my education, I’ve done quite untraditional things. There are very few Etonians who went to Rada. And far fewer Etonians – certainly when I was there – went to Cambridge. I don’t know whether it’s the same now. Most people I knew went to Oxford, because it seemed more of an easy bridge.”

Arriving at the time of the Laura Spence affair – the high-flying state-school pupil who was refused a place at Oxford, allegedly because of her working-class background – he says the entrance examiners put him through his paces. “They made sure I was able to think for myself and stand on my own two feet, intellectually. Cambridge is a meritocratic place. I know this sounds odd, but I met more kinds of people there than I’ve probably met in any place in my life. It seemed to be so international, and there were people from all walks of life, all backgrounds. Any chips on any shoulders had to be very swiftly removed, in any direction.”

When we speak for a second time, just before Christmas, Hiddleston has been “knee-deep in mud, blood and warrior poetry”, playing the title role in a new Sam Mendes-produced BBC film of Shakespeare’s Henry V. With plans to shoot Henry IV Part 1 and 2 in early 2012 – in which he will reprise the role as Prince Hal – it truly feels as though he’s taking over from his fellow Rada alumnus Branagh, who famously directed himself in his 1989 film of Henry V. Already dubbed “Branagh’s boy” in the press, Hiddleston clearly sees him as a mentor. “I trust him implicitly,” he says.

I ask whether he chatted with Branagh about taking on the role of Henry V. “Over the years, we’ve talked about it,” he admits. “He was very kind. He sent me an email when he found out. He just said, 'I heard about the Henrys. The very, very best of luck. You’ll have a fantastic time.’ I was going to ask him about it, then I thought, 'I don’t know.’ What I took from that email was that I had his blessing, in a sense. And I do feel Shakespeare is like an Olympic torch that gets passed on from generation to generation.”

Never mind the Bard: Hiddleston has taken the torch from Branagh, it seems, as he goes once more unto the breach.

Our special pair~~~ MarkJin (Mark x Jr.)

Words: 5,089

Genre: FLUFF, FLUFF, FLUFF (yo! call up your dentists, oh those cavities will be rolling in)

Summary: Where Mark may be getting deported, but Jinyoung is too busy forgetting plans and instead opting for the movies with an—average—fencer from Hong Kong………..but its not like Mark cares or anything.

(I’m sorry i turned this into a total chickflick, so sorry in advance…..but you may want to read it first :P)

Keep reading

idk i have a headcanon that sherlock was super geeky at uni – thick rimmed glasses, always wearing polo shirts and jumpers and nice khaki trousers and brown brogues, his nose always buried in his books, hair everywhere all wild like a mad scientist as he performed experiments 

he may have been mocked for it, teased to an inch of his life which is why he changed so much, maybe even why he turned to drugs other than to calm his brain, but i can picture him all geeky acing all his tests, reading all the books in the library and just being super dorky and adorable  

4

Dressing down a suit. Take 3

Take 3 of wearing a suit without a tie (See take 1 & Take 2).

Worsted flannel navy chalk stripe suit, khaki pique cotton polo shirt, brown oxford suede brogues, brown felt hat and a paisley scarf.