brooklyn museum

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As the 2018 Grammy nominations show, hip-hop’s dominance was greater than ever over the past year, and Spotify’s RapCaviar playlist has played no small role in consolidating the genre’s strength.

To celebrate the three breakthrough hip-hop artists of the year, the company is launching the inaugural RapCaviar Pantheon, which will pay tribute every year to rising stars in unique artistic formats. According to a press release, the artists were decided by a combination of data and curation, in keeping with the curatorial approach of the RapCaviar playlist. For the launch, the company has created three life-size sculptures of this year’s inductees — Metro Boomin, SZA and21 Savage, which will be unveiled in an exhibition Thursday night at the Brooklyn Museum.

“Across time, people have had the desire to immortalize others for their contributions to society. And for hip hop, that time has come,” said Seth Farbman, Spotify’s Chief Marketing Officer. “Not only has hip hop dominated music culture, it has influenced American culture and we are honored to have artists who are breaking down barriers and shaping culture, as the first inductees of the inaugural RapCaviar Pantheon program.”

Ancient Egyptian limestone statue of a married couple named Nebsen and Nebet-Ta. Artist unknown; 18th Dynasty, reign of Thutmose IV or Amenhotep III (ca. 1400-1352 BCE).  Thought to come from Dahamsha; now in the Brooklyn Museum.  Photo credit: David Liam Moran/Wikimedia Commons.

Eastman Johnson (1824-1906)
“A Ride for Liberty - The Fugitive Slaves”
(1862)
Oil on paperboard
Located in the Brooklyn Museum, New York City, New York, United States

Johnson portrayed an enslaved family charging for the safety of Union lines in the dull light of dawn. The absence of white figures in this liberation subject makes it virtually unique in art of the period—these African Americans are independent agents of their own freedom. Johnson claimed to have based the painting on an actual event he witnessed near the Manassas, Virginia, battlefield on March 2, 1862, just days before the Confederate stronghold was ceded to Union forces.

Beaded elephant mask of the Bamileke people, Cameroon, worn by members of the Kuosi masking society (an elite society made up of royalty and other men of high rank).  Artist unknown; 20th century.  Now in the Brooklyn Museum.  Photo credit Brooklyn Museum.

Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933)
“On the Way between Old and New Cairo, Citadel Mosque of Mohammed Ali, and Tombs of the Mamelukes” (1872)
Oil on canvas
Located in the Brooklyn Museum, New York City, United States