broadcast medium

every single mcr album character is adopted by me. the killjoys? gracie? cherri and blue and the whole comics crew? the patient? fear and regret? colton haynes and his ghostly gf? even mother war herself? emily? bonnie and clyde? helena the corpse bride? even the unnamed bullets people?? all my kids, they deserve some attention. my city now.

TAZ DESERVES A MOVIE FOR EACH STORY ARC, FULL PRODUCTION PULL OUT ALL THE STOPS, GIVE IT TO ME HOLLYWOOD!!! THE BALANCE ARC WAS AN INCREDIBLE STORY WITH REPRESENTATION, POSITIVE THEMES AND AN AWE-INSPIRING PLOT, PLEASE HOLLYWOOD!!! GIVE ME A GODDAMN BROADWAY MUSICAL BRING THESE BOYS TO LIFE IN EVERY MEDIUM! BROADCAST THEIR STORY ACROSS EVERY PLANE OF REALITY! DO IT!!!!!

Endless List of Favorites

→ things: Old Time Radio

The old-time radio era, sometimes referred to as the Golden Age of Radio, was an era of radio programming in the United States during which radio was the dominant electronic home entertainment medium. It began with the birth of commercial radio broadcasting in the early 1920s and lasted until the 1950s, when television superseded radio as the medium of choice for scripted programming. During this period radio was the only broadcast medium, and people regularly tuned into their favorite radio programs, and families gathered to listen to the home radio in the evening. A variety of formats and genres were created for the new medium, many of which later migrated to television: radio plays, mystery serials, soap operas, quiz shows, talent shows, variety hours, situation comedies, children’s shows, cooking shows. X

Star Trek Discovery Review

WARNING     -     MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS    -    READ AT YOUR OWN RISK

The wait is finally over, and ‘Star Trek: Discovery’ is underway.  Last night saw the premiere of the first two episodes. ‘The Vulcan Hello’ and ‘Battle At The Binary Stars’.  As has been mentioned everywhere, this ‘Star Trek’ comes in a very different television landscape than any other ‘Trek’ series.  As such, the storytelling methods have changed, as well as the medium of broadcast.  Theis ‘Star Trek’ promises to tell more of an arc of a story than any of its predecessors (with the except of the later seasons of ‘Deep Space Nine’).  Now the question is how will the series hold up in viewers minds.

We spend these first two episodes getting to know First Officer Michael Burnham and Captain Phillippa Georgiou and to a lesser extent Lieutenant Saru.  Sonequa Martin-Green, Michelle Yeoh, and Doug Jones bring a good familiarity to the roles and manage to make it feel as though they have been serving aboard a ship together for years.  The shock of the two episodes (which I’m not going to specifically reveal) comes as a disappointment as a result of this comradery.  Hopefully, we’ll still somehow get to see more of it.  

As a show lead, Martin-Green brings a humanity to Michael Burnham that we haven’t necessarily seen in previous shows.  Characters like Kirk, Picard, etc were expected to be leaders and as such almost incapable of misstep.   Perhaps it’s the freedom given by not having Burnham in charge that allows for such an immediately real character.  It will be interesting to see the progression of this character, who has such a shift in standing right off the bat.

The Klingons are at once new and familiar.  The portrayal of the race is similar to what we have seen since ‘The Next Generation’.  The 24 houses of the Klingon race appear to each have their own characteristics instead of being solely family divisions.  What appears to be a unifying trait should sound very familiar in the current political environment.  The Klingons want nothing to do with the Federation because they feel that they will lose something of themselves if they do.  Being set 10 years before the events of the original series, we know that peace won’t be achieved, but getting to a neutral zone will be the challenge.  

‘Discovery’ is off to a compelling start.  The storytelling is tight with a much more modern feel than previous ‘Star Trek’ series.  It does seem to benefit from being freed from network restrictions and tells a more adult story.  With the costs of war being portrayed so realistically, the drama is that much more compelling.  The uncertainty of the road ahead almost demands you pay it attention, which is what any show should do.

Chicago Broadcasters introducing the New Ampex VRX-1000 Videotape Recorder (Later to be renamed the Mark IV), at the National Association of Radio and Television, March 14, 1956.

things i have no chill about:
  • danger days
  • the 4th studio album by american alternative rock band my chemical romance
  • mcr’s last original album
  • the album that came after the black parade
  • the album that is often disregarded for the sake of mcr’s stereotypical emo image i am bitter
  • the album that was released by reprise records on november 22, 2010
  • produced by rob cavallo
  • mixed by chris lord-alge
  • 15 tracks
  • 2 bonus tracks
  • 6 single releases
  • 1 world tour
  • danger days: the true lives of the fabulous killjoys

HC: There is an expression in the Zones,“don’t write their name on the mailbox“. It is used against negative thinking when a killjoy has disappeared and it is unknown if they are alive or dead. Example: 

Poison: Kobra should’ve been back days ago. What if he got himself ghosted?

Cherri: Don’t write his name on the mailbox just yet. We don’t know what might be keeping him, I’m sure he’s fine.

So here’s a thought I’ve had for a while...

The Black Parade and the Phoenix Witch are essentially the same thing. TBP is based on the belief that death comes for you in the shape of your favourite memory - in the Patient’s case, that’s seeing the marching band as a kid. In the Zones, however, many people grow up with legends and the faith of the Phoenix Witch, so that’s what death looks like to them, because that’s what they imagine it to look like. To some Killjoys, who don’t believe in the Witch or follow another religion, it might look different.
Both the Witch and the Black Parade serve the same purpose: to guide and bring peace to the souls of those who die in battle, be it an actual war, a rebellion like the killjoys’, or the battle against illness and your own demons, like the Patient.

One of my favourite things ...

 …about the Dangerverse is how open it is in terms of interpretation and representation. there are multiple characters whose gender and/or sexuality is purposely ambiguous, the way the gay relationships are introduced and portrayed is pretty natural and chill, and gee confirms vaya and vamos as genderfluid and encourages people’s gender headcanons on twitter, and everyone in the fandom is super accepting of each other’s interpretations, and that’s just another reason why I love danger days and everything it gave us so so incredibly much.

Fun Ghoul: Everyone’s like whoa, ants can lift 50 times their weight. A fucking leaf is like 50 times their weight. I’ll fight an ant right now.

Kobra Kid: nice to see you’re finally taking on someone your own size.

(insp.)