broadband

Internet Providers By Zip Code

Change of plans. I’ve been working on my website about broadband Internet and finding it quite time consuming. Both of us don’t have a lot of time to work on it after work and it is also rather boring to do sometimes.

And then I find Internet providers by zip code on these other sites, like the Broadband Map and Broadband Now and stuff like that. Not sure if I can offer anything more or better than they do.

It’s kinda discouraging to try and create a new site like that when there are already so many other big established ones with such a head start. Sigh. Not sure what the next steps will be, but sites about Internet providers and the state of broadband in America, well, that might have to wait.

Unfortunately for the commission, all the lipstick in the world can’t disguise this pig.
—  Ajit Pai, Federal Communications Commission, arguing that the FCC doesn’t have the authority to interfere with state sovereignty. The FCC then voted to forbid states from restricting city-run broadband internet before going on to talk about whether to enforce net neutrality rules.
Launching Our Broadband Site

Times are tough and paying for hosting and domains and templates and stuff like that is off the table for now, so we set up a Weebly with a friend. For now, we are calling it the Broadband Guide. After we register a domain name that has something to do with high speed Internet providers (most of the ones I thought of are taken), then we’ll know what the permanent name is.

For now, we’ll just build it on Weebly and expand it (for free). You can pay for Weebly pro, but we just need the free version right now. I’ve got a friend with a zip code database that I’m going to merge with my ISP data.

The broadband Internet industry is several billion dollars in size. All we want is a few thousand per month, then we can quit our jobs. Time to get started.

The proliferation of new smartphone owners, including Americans without home broadband access, has not been enough to close the most significant gaps in the digital divide, according to a new Pew Research Center study.

“The Smartphone Difference,” released this week, shows that smartphone owners relying on the technology as their only link to the Internet are more likely to use it for a job hunt or to access other vital services. They’re also more likely to have their smartphone service cut off due to financial hardship.

And that momentary inconvenience could be “the difference between hearing back from a job and being able to apply for a job,” said study coauthor Aaron Smith. “This could affect their financial situation in a meaningful way.”

A microplasma is created by focusing intense laser pulses in ambient air with a microscope objective in the lab of University of Rochester Institute of Optics Ph.D. student Fabrizio Buccheri and his advisor, Professor Xi-Cheng Zhang. Besides visible light, the microplasma emits electromagnetic pulses at terahertz frequencies that can be used to detect complex molecules, such as explosives and drugs. Credit: Photo by J. Adam Fenster / University of Rochester

Generating broadband terahertz radiation from a microplasma in air

I’m Louis, She’s Eleanor

I trust you can tell which is which in our photo, :P

We’re newly weds, starting out, just got married in January 2015. We met at our jobs in the Comcast customer service department. That’s right, everybody in America hates us, but we love each other.

As billing reps, we know your pain when it comes to Internet service. Hey, we don’t cause it, we just try to help sort it out and fix it.

Working for Comcast? Well, it has it’s ups and downs. Most people don’t have much of choice beyond the cable company for getting high speed Internet. If you are having a touch time learning your options, you can always check for all local Internet providers by zip code at sites like the Broadband Map or ones we found on this other Tumblr page.

Of course, most of you will still go with cable Internet, since it’s the fastest, but hey, America companies don’t really like competition, now do they?

We’re starting this blog because we want to quit our jobs! We’re starting up a new site about finding broadband Internet providers, reviewing them, and just comparing them against each other and ISPs in other countries. We both know a lot about the inner workings of Internet service providers, so we’ll try to help you understand how to really pick a good one, or at least deal with the bad ones, if you don’t really have a choice, :)

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5 things you didn’t know about…fibre optics

‘Silica is thematerial of choice for most optical fibres, because it boasts good transmission over a wide range of wavelengths.’

1. Optical fibres consist of a core, surrounded by a cladding layer, and an outer buffer later that acts as a protective coating.

2. They are produced by drawing large-diameter preforms into thin fibres at temperatures up to 2,200oC.

3. Most are coated with a UV-cured urethane acrylate during the drawing process for protection.

4. In 2011, the bandwidth record for an optical fibre was set at more than 100 terabits (100x1012 bits) per second.

5. In medicine, endoscopes made of fibre optics allow doctors to view or operate on patients with minimal interference.  

For more on the history of fibre optics, read Anna Ploszaski’s Material of the Month piece here bit.ly/1og5IGX

Vivint Becomes First Wireless Internet Service Provider (WISP) to Offer Fiber-Fast Speeds Through the Air 

Vivint, a leading provider of smart home technology, today announced Vivint Internet, a pioneering broadband service that offers residential customers high-speed Internet access through the air. The service is a fast and affordable alternative to the high-speed services offered by competing Internet service providers. Vivint Internet offers symmetrical 100 Mbps download and upload speeds for…

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New Post has been published on http://edgysocial.com/will-the-fcc-ignore-our-complaint-did-att-commit-perjury-claiming-it-had-covered-100-percent-of-21-states-with-broadband/

Will the FCC Ignore Our Complaint? Did AT&T Commit Perjury, Claiming it had Covered 100 Percent of 21 States with Broadband?

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Rumors are flying that the proposed AT&T-DirecTV merger is a done deal. And yet, it appears that the FCC ignored our complaint, which outlined that AT&T may have committed perjury during the previous AT&T-BellSouth merger. In 2008, AT&T claimed it had fulfilled a merger commitment to have 100% of their 21 state territory covered with broadband, (al…
Business – The Huffington Post

Republicans Voice Opposition To Subsidizing Broadband For The Poor

Republicans Voice Opposition To Subsidizing Broadband For The Poor

Tom Wheeler, the chairperson of the Federal Communications Commission released a plan last week that would create a program that subsidizes broadband internet service for poor people. The plan calls for an expansion of the Lifeline phone subsidy program created by Ronald Reagan in 1985. In addition to expanding the program to cover internet subsidies, the plan also will work to crack down on…

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In the end, though, the reason Google has invested in fiber is less important than the practical outcome of that investment. In effect, what the company is doing—both in building these networks and in pushing national providers to upgrade—is providing a public good whose spillover benefits are likely to be immense, and one that neither the government nor the private sector was doing much to deliver. This is somewhat similar to what Google did, on a smaller scale, back in 2008, when the FCC was auctioning off sections of the airwaves to wireless providers. The FCC had announced that if bids for a certain slice of the spectrum exceeded $4.6 billion, it would attach an open-access requirement that existing wireless providers didn’t want to have to follow. So Google placed a bid that was above the FCC’s price. It did so not in the expectation of winning (though it was prepared to spend the money if it did) but, rather, in order to ensure that regardless of who won—in this case, Verizon—the open-access requirement would go into effect. … 

What Google’s doing, in these cases, is using its deep pockets in the interest of broader social ends, with seemingly little concern for short-term returns. This strategy has historical precedent. In the early years of the American republic, there was little appetite for government spending on public works, like roads and canals. But the country needed better roads to facilitate the growth of trade and commerce. So the states turned to private companies, which built turnpikes that they then operated as toll roads. In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, hundreds of these companies invested millions of dollars in laying thousands of miles of road, in effect providing the basic infrastructure for travel in the United States.

… the shareholders—who were typically local merchants and manufacturers—saw their investments in turnpikes as a way to collectively provide a public good that, not incidentally, would also deliver benefits to them as business owners and consumers. They knew, of course, that other businesses would benefit from these roads even if they didn’t invest in them (the nature of a public good being that everyone can use it). But that didn’t mean the investment wasn’t worth making. It’s hard not to see a similar logic underlying much of what Google does