british versions

“The Office” Facts & Trivia
  • During the first season of the show, NBC seriously considered cancelling the show because other shows like Wife Swap were outdoing The Office’s ratings, but after Steve Carell’s “The 40-Year-Old Virgin,” the show made a breakout. 
  • Rainn Wilson, who played Dwight Schrute, originally auditioned for the role of Michael Scott. 
  • Originally, the TV show Parks & Recreation was supposed to be a spin-off show with Rashida Jones (who played Karen in The Office), but the spin-off idea was scrapped. 
  • The Office was originally supposed to air on FX or HBO before it landed on NBC with a wider audience. 
  • The episode “The Farm” in The Office’s final season was supposed to be a backdoor pilot for a new spin-off TV show starring Rainn Wilson (Dwight Schrute). However, NBC passed on The Farm and the episode was simply another one in a very long final season. 
  • Jenna Fischer (Pam) and Angela Kinsey (Angela) are best friends in real life. 
  • John Krasinski (Jim) and BJ Novak (Ryan Howard) went to high school together. 
  • Some of the writers of the show actually acted in the show. Mindy Kaling (Kelly), Paul Lieberstein (Toby), and BJ Novak (Ryan) were among them. 
  • Steve Carell almost missed out on being Michael Scott because he was working in another NBC sitcom titled “Come to Papa.” 
  • The Officer’s producers originally wanted to make Jim and Pam’s relationship an interracial love story. 
  • Oscar Nunez being gay was unplanned. He would not have been gay if not for a pink shirt he wore because of the wardrobe staff. 
  • When the show was still airing, tons of people came up to Jenna Fischer (Pam) and told her they were disappointed with Pam’s “strong willed personality and assertiveness.” 
  • John Krasinski (Jim) shot the videos of Scranton in the opening credits and theme song of the show. 
  • The opening credits of The Office revealed the real Penn Paper Building on Mifflin Avenue in Scranton.
  • The show’s cast often surfed the Internet in between takes. 
  • Four characters had the same name as the actors who played them - Angela Kinsey, Oscar Nunez, Phyllis Smith and Creed Bratton. 
  • The character Ryan Howard got his last name from a popular athlete. 
  • Brian Baumgartner (Kevin) and Ed Helms (Andy) were batch mates together in a school in Georgia.  
  • Poor Richard’s Pub is actually a pub in Scranton. 
  • The opening credits of The Office revealed a section of the Los Angeles Municipal Code. 
  • Steve Carell was never a fan of the British version of the show. 
  • Steve Carell placed a British flag on his desk in the show to honor the British version, although he didn’t even have a desire to watch it. 
  • Jenna Fischer kept her character Pam’s engagement ring in the series. 
  • The value of Pam’s engagement ring was around $5,000. 
  • The warehouse used in the basketball episode was really just below the actual office. 
  • Dunder Mifflin is now recognized by the Chamber of Commerce. 
  • Paul Giamatti was NBC’s first choice for the role of Michael Scott; however, Paul turned down the role. 
  • Before his audition, Steve Carell had only seen 5 minutes of the British version of The Office. 
  • Seth Rogan auditioned for the role of Dwight Schrute. 
  • Angela Kinsey originally auditioned for the role of Pam. 
  • Kate Flannery (Meredith) originally auditioned for the role of Jan. 
  • Phyllis Smith, who played Phyllis, was originally the casting director for the show, but producers loved her so much, they created a role for her. 
  • Oscar Nunez didn’t think the show would be a hit, so he kept his jobs as a server and babysitter after he got the role. 
  • Jenna Fischer’s real-life pregnancy was not an issue for writers because they were already planning a Pam-Jim pregnancy. 
  • Dwight Schrute was supposed to leave the show after the ninth season and have his own spin-off show titled “The Farm.” 
  • In the episode “The Launch Party,” John Krasinski accidentally signs Meredith’s pelvic cast with his name and not Jim’s name.
  • In the episode “A Benihana Christmas,” Michael, Andy, and Jim dine at the exact same Benihana restaurant that Carell’s character goes to in “The 40-Year-Old Virgin.”
  • Before the show, most of the show’s writers had never had a writing job before. 
  • Mindy’s roommate made an appearance in season two of the show, playing Brenda Matlowe, an executive from Dunder Mifflin corporate who came to evaluate Michael’s “leadership training exercise” in season two’s “Booze Cruise” episode. 
  • Before B.J. Novak was hired on the show, he was working as Ashton Kutcher’s lead accomplice on MTV’s Punk’d in 2003. 

So, I’ve got a question for the Australian tumblr - why does your version of GBBO look like it was shot in a Playmobil kitchen? 

Types of Literary Criticism

NEW CRITICISM, or: “READ THE FUCKING TEXT”


  • Also known as ‘practical criticism’.
  • This theory was dominant in the US and UK between the 30s and 70s. 
  • A formalist, decontextualised approach to literature where the text is examined independently of other influences.
  • Explores the essential elements of language, imagery, symbolism, figures of speech, ambiguity, irony, paradox.
  • Pretty huge span of approaches - for example, within Shakespearean new criticism you had A.C. Bradley’s character-based critique, Harley Granville-Barker’s study of stagecraft, G. Wilson Knight’s exploration of image and theme, and L.C. Knights’ suggestion that Bradley is a douche and Shakespeare was a poet, not a dramatist. (Yeah, fuck you, Knights.)


HISTORICIST CRITICISM, or: “IT’S ALL ABOUT THE HISTORICAL CONTEXT, DUH”

  • Funnily enough, this approach believes that historical context influences interpretation.
  • Stuff like: religion, political idealism of the time, cultural shifts, social attitudes, war, colonialism (although that’s a whole other bag of cats, see below), pop culture references and in-jokes, and anything that might have influenced the text during the era in which it was written.
  • Within historicist criticism there should be a distinction between text and context; history is the background that the text passively reflects.
  • Buuuut often this approach reveals more about the critic’s political/social/personal values than the period they are studying. Natch. 


LIBERAL HUMANISM, or: “STORIES ARE JUST A REFLECTION OF THE AUTHOR, DUDE”

  • Popular at the beginning of the 1900s - literature and art are timeless, revealing a universal truth about humanity.
  • Like, writers are totally free agents whose intentions shape the meaning of their writing, man. 
  • Like, human consciousness shapes language, culture and society, NOT the other way around.


MARXISM, or “WE’RE ALL SLAVES TO THE ECONOMY” 

  • A criticial theory systemised in the 20s, based on the materialist philosophy of Karl Marx (1818-83) and Friedrich Engels (1820-95) whereby the material circumstances of life are determining factors in the individual’s experience.
  • So, like, the economic organisation of society shapes culture, politics, philosophy, religion, education, law and art.
  • So, like, fuck liberal humanism; people are shaped by their environment, NOT the other way around. Authors and their works are basically products of society. 
  • These guys believe that art reflects changing economic conditions and class values. There’s a little cross-over with historicist criticism in the approach that literature should be interpreted within the context of the period and its political inflections - often with a focus on the lower classes.
  • Get yourself familiar with the Marxist concept of ‘ideology’ - a function which ‘naturalises’ the inequalities of power through a complex structure of social perceptions which renders class division invisible. 
  • Yeah. It’s heavy, dude.


STRUCTURALISM, or: “LANGUAGE IS EVERYTHIIIING!”

  • Based on the linguistic theory of Ferdinand de Saussure (1857-1913)
  • The belief that language shapes humanity, culture, communication, and the way we perceive the world. Yay, go language.
  • Structuralism was a radical theory during the second half of the 20th Century whose central argument opposed liberal humanist ideas (Recap: lib-humans reckoned that human consciousness creates language and culture - structuralists reckoned the complete opposite. At this point everyone is basically being completely contrary for the sake of it.)


POST STRUCTURALISM, or “WE’RE SORT OF ON THE FENCE ABOUT LANGUAGE SO JUST GO WITH IT”

  • A critical theory prominent in France in the 1960s, primarily associated with philosopher Jacques Derrida and critic Roland Barthes - a reaction against structuralism as well as a development of it. <sigh>
  • Ok, so this language thing? How about we agree that reality is constituted through language BUT language itself is unstable and beyond our control. Like, language is an unreliable narrator, yeah? Yeahhh.
  • Essentially, it’s language that speaks, not the author. So let’s call it THE DEATH OF THE AUTHOR because we are needlessly dramatic. 
  • So, like, literary texts don’t present a single or unified view and the author cannot claim authority on interpretation. (The curtains are blue…)
  • You can trace a whole thread of critical development here from formalist criticism to structuralism to post-structuralism and later to deconstruction - all of which are concerned with the ambiguity and contradictions within text and language. To make it even more confusing, new historicism (see below) can also be seen as post-structuralist since it places stress on a text’s connection to culture rather than relying on the autonomy of the text itself.
  • Time for a stiff drink.


NEW HISTORICISM, or “IT’S THE CIIIIRCLE OF LIIIIIIFE - ART AND HISTORY ARE STUCK IN AN INFINITY LOOP” 

  • A term coined by Stephen Greenblatt (Shakespeare-critic-extraordinaire) in the 80s - a reaction against old historicism (where text is a reflection of historical background) and a move away from Marxist and post-structural theories.
  • New historicism asserts that the text is an active participant in historical development.
  • So, like, art and literature help to create the cultural values of the period in which they are produced. BUT, we are also formed and tied to cultural ideologies, so it ain’t all about the text. 
  • Involves close reading of the text, taking into account political ideology, social practice, religion, class division and conflict within society.
  • A pessimistic take on Foucault: the belief that we are ‘remarkably unfree’ of the influence of society and socio-political power operates through the language of major institutions to determine what’s normal and demonise ‘otherness’.
  • Seriously. Fuck society. 


CULTURAL MATERIALISM, or “WE NEED A BRITISH VERSION OF NEW HISTORICISM”

  • We can’t let the Americans monopolise this kind of criticism.
  • Goddamn Greenblatt.
  • So consider this: how much freedom of thought do we actually have? Does culture shape our identities or can we think independently of dominant ideologies? Huh? Huh? Are we saying anything new yet? 
  • Basically, a historicist approach to political criticism with a revised conception of the connection between literature and culture. 
  • Culture is a complex, unstable and dynamic creature which offers an opportunity for the radical subversion of power and society.
  • Unlike historicism or Marxism, cultural materialists believe the author is able to achieve a degree of independence from prevailing structures of power and discourse. 
  • Often demonstrates optimism for political change - once again, critical theory reflects the critic’s personal opinions and hopes for change in present day society. Literary criticism can change the world, man.
  • Some crossover into feminist/queer/post-colonial theory, because FUCK ALL THOSE OLD WHITE GUYS.


FEMINIST THEORY, or: “LET’S RECONSIDER 100 YEARS OF CRITICISM FROM A PERSPECTIVE THAT ISN’T CIS/MALE”

  • Following the women’s movement of the 1960s, feminist theory was established in the 70s and 80s and founded on texts Le Deuxieme Sex by Simone de Beauvoir and Sexual Politics by Kate Millett.
  • Explicitly political – similarities to new historicism and cultural materialism - challenging the subordinate position of women in society and deconstructing/contesting the concept of essentialism, whereby men and women have intrinsically separate qualities and natures. 
  • Often seen as an attack on the Western literary canon and the exclusion of female writers throughout history. Focuses on female characters and authors, exploring the influence and restrictions of patriarchy, and constructions of gender, femininity and sexuality (both in text and culture).
  • Feminists influenced by post-structuralism tend to disregard the positive discrimination of women writers, claiming “it is language that speaks, not the author.”
  • Feminism and psychoanalytical theories (esp Freud and Lacan) contributed to the erosion of liberal humanist ideas, redefining human nature and the concept of child development, and exploring the psychology of patriarchy and male-dominated culture. 


GAY/LESBIAN CRITICISM AND QUEER THEORY, or: “LET’S RECONSIDER 100 YEARS OF CRITICISM FROM A PERSPECTIVE THAT ISN’T CIS/MALE/STRAIGHT”

  • During the 80s, queer theory was influenced by post-structuralist ideas of identity as being fluid and unstable, and investigates the role of sexual orientation within literary criticism from a social and political viewpoint.
  • An opposition to homophobia and the privilege of heterosexual culture and an exploration of themes that have been suppressed by conservative critical theory.
  • A look at LGBQTA, non-binary characters and authors and their influence within a historical, political, religious and social context.
  • The end of ‘gal-pals’ and ‘no-homo’, fuckboys.


POST COLONIAL THEORY, or: “LET’S RECONSIDER 100 YEARS OF CRITICAL THEORY FROM A PERSPECTIVE THAT ISN’T WHITE”

  • A critique on the English canon and colonial rule with a focus on canonical texts written during periods of colonisation.
  • An exploration of cultural displacement/appropriation and the language and cultural values thrust upon/developed by colonised people.
  • Post-colonial theory gives voices to colonial ‘subjects’ and looks at the impact on individual and collective identity, as well as the complexity of colonial relationships and interaction.
  • Gonna have a lot to do with politics, history, social ideology, religion and international/race relations, obvs. Stay woke.
latimes.com
After a rocky year, Fifth Harmony is in control — and tighter than ever
Fifth Harmony is at a crossroads. Having lost a member in a public fallout right after the group brokeout, the girls are in full control of their sound and brand. Will they finally make it big?
By Gerrick D. Kennedy

Inside a Burbank rehearsal studio, the women of Fifth Harmony — surrounded by the thousands of album booklets they’ve autographed for fans, the most dedicated of whom are known as “Harmonizers” — are having an emoji debate.

They want to use the digital icons to accompany the online reveal of the track list for their upcoming self-titled album, due Aug. 25 via Syco Music/Epic.

Dinah Jane Hansen, 20, suggested a finger pointing downward as a clue for the album’s lead single, “Down,” but the rest weren’t as easy.

“We need to go quicker, guys,” Ally Brooke Hernandez, 24, instructed as they struggled to stifle giggles.

After all, there’s other, more important business for Fifth Harmony to convey in 2017.

“We should mention we wrote most of these,” said Normani Kordei, 21.

Co-writing and ownership of records is a first for these women — since being put together on the U.S. edition of the televised singing competition “The X Factor,” the members of Fifth Harmony, which also includes Lauren Jauregui, 21, have struggled to assert their independence and prove they’re singular artists who are not just a made-for-TV creation.

We’re so in sync, the four of us. When you have a strong unit, there’s no stopping you.

— Lauren Jauregui

That Fifth Harmony even made it to album No. 3 is something of a feat. Just a few months ago, the group was parting ways — acrimoniously — with one of its founding members as rumors of conflict hit a fever pitch.

And yet in recent weeks, the act has filmed two music videos — including a sexy, lo-fi clip for “Angel,” its new single that was produced by Skrillex and carries hip-hop-inflections — and its members are rehearsing for a tour and Fifth Harmony’s debut at the MTV Video Music Awards on Aug. 27.

“It’s the most monumental moment of our careers,” Kordei said. And the turnaround couldn’t have come quicker. Though the act seemed to be coming into its own with last year’s well-received release “7/27,” there was enough behind-the-scenes drama to fill a whole other reality show.

In December, the group appeared to be in crisis when it announced that singer Camila Cabello had exited just hours after a performance.

The group claims Cabello informed them via her representatives that she was out, something Cabello has rebutted.

And then things got messier.

Shortly after news of Cabello’s departure broke, a recording was leaked of Jauregui tearfully telling Hernandez that the group was being treated like “literal slaves.”

They were exhausted from touring — a period in which more than one member lost loved ones — and frustrated by a lack of creative fulfillment. From the beginning, Fifth Harmony has said that it had zero say in collaborators or the creation of its music, often receiving songs the day before studio sessions.

Often, its members say, the anxiety was crippling, and they started to resent performing. The dream of being the preeminent girl group of its generation was proving to be anything but.

We’ve been taking leaps of faiths — and trusting ourselves.

— Dinah Jane Hansen

“We lost the magic of it all,” Hansen added. “We were doing songs just to do songs.”

The magic, such as it was, began in 2012 when the thenteens entered the short-lived U.S. edition of “The X Factor” as solo contestants. They fizzled out but were then packaged as a group by Simon Cowell and then-Epic Records Chairman L.A. Reid.

Fifth Harmony took third place in the competition, scoring a joint deal with Epic Records and Cowell’s Syco Music.

Though a wave of boy bands had found recent success — including One Direction (assembled on the British version of “X Factor” — no girl group had managed to hit it big like Danity Kane, Pussycat Dolls, Destiny’s Child, the Spice Girls or TLC did in their prime.

Today, pop is dominated by assertive yet solo female artists, and Fifth Harmony risked looking like a relic from another era. And that doesn’t even consider the simple challenge of cultivating chemistry among a group of teenage girls who met on a TV show.

“When you get in a group, you have to go in understanding it’s not just about you and your ideas. It is a collaboration,” said TLC’s Rozonda “Chilli” Thomas. “When you think of [girl groups], most of them don’t stay together, because it’s not easy at all. Chemistry is something you either have or don’t have.”

Epic worked heavily to sell Fifth Harmony, keeping the group on the road constantly, often booking concerts at malls. “Every season, for 4½ years … I was a zombie,” Jauregui recalls.

From the outside, there was much to celebrate.

Fifth Harmony’s 2015 debut, “Reflection,” saw the group pick up where Destiny’s Child and TLC had left off, with an album full of slinky dance-pop and R&B/hip-hop-informed girl power anthems — with breakout single “Worth It” becoming one of the year’s biggest earworms.

The act then made history last year as the first girl group to score a top 10 Billboard Hot 100 smash in nearly a decade with the snappy “Work From Home.”

Yet the women in Fifth Harmony said they it felt burnt out and controlled by the label — like “puppets,” they agree. The women pushed though teary onstage breakdowns, infighting and family feuding.

“It came to a point where I’d catch myself onstage and realize, ‘I’m not feeling this,’” Kordei said. “It scared me, because this is what I want to do for the rest of my life.”

Today, the women are relaxed and comfortable discussing their recent history. They’re dressed in active wear — Kordei’s shirt has “Phenomenal Woman” emblazoned across it, while Jauregui is wearing the anti-discrimination top Frank Ocean recently made famous — and their faces are makeup-free.

Jauregui reflected on the stress of the past.

We’ve been grateful to have a machine behind us. But we definitely needed respect — and we had to demand it.

— Ally Brooke Hernandez

“You’re in front of so many people that you know love you,” she said. “To be in a space where you don’t connect or when you feel bored in that kinda setting …”

“You feel guilty,” Kordei offered.

“It’s overwhelming to have your whole, entire life planned for something you don’t feel passionate about,” said Jauregui, the room falling silent. “You’re not seeing your family, your friends. You’re not doing anything for yourself. It was depressing, draining and sad. Now, it’s a whole different thing.”

In fact, the members of Fifth Harmony had long been fighting for the autonomy and respect that they are only now receiving. In late 2015, Hernandez contacted outspoken L.A. music lawyer Dina LaPolt, who helped the group clean house.

LaPolt got them new management with the powerhouse firm Maverick and helped transfer the Fifth Harmony trademark from Cowell to its members, giving them complete ownership of the brand.

A more favorable contact with Epic was then negotiated, but the women still weren’t in the driver’s seat when it came to music.

Everything we’ve been through, the ups and downs, I really believe it was to shape and mold us for this moment.

— Normani Kordei

“We were 15, 16 and 19 when we started,” Jauregui said. “We didn’t have any basic understanding of business, and we’re being thrown into this world of wolves where they really screw you over with contracts. We were really in a line of adversity.”

After Cabello’s departure, the women realized they wanted to work on repairing the group’s dynamic as well as its relationship with the label in order to become more vocal about its career ambitions. “We all got on the same page … and fought for our say,” Hansen said.

A key ally was Epic A&R executive Chris Anokute, who joined their team during the recording of “7/27.”

“They were uninspired, beaten up, bruised. They weren’t gelling,” Anokute said. “You could tell there were some things going on between the girls … issues with management. They started venting their insecurities and desire to write songs, and I realized they were never a part of it.”

Anokute pushed Reid to commit to another album after the turmoil with Cabello (Reid left the label in May), bolstering the group’s confidence.

“We are being more respected this time around,” Hansen said. “We are in a place where we know what we want and who we are. We’ve recognized our truth and what we have to offer — and our power.”

I love these girls and consider them sisters. I have such high visions for us, the four of us. Everything that has come true this year has been validation.

— Ally Brooke Hernandez

Fifth Harmony finding its voice shows on the new album — its title a nod to the group’s newfound independence.

The album was recorded in seven weeks at Santa Monica’s Windmark Recording, and the women co-wrote more than half of the songs on the project — splitting into pairs and penning the type of tunes they’ve wanted to do alongside handpicked producers, including Dreamlab, the Stereotypes, Harmony Samuels, the Monsters & Strangerz and Tommy Brown.

The record is raw, soulful, sexy and fully the group’s own vision.

On a recent afternoon, the pop of a Champagne bottle echoed around a boardroom inside Epic Records’ headquarters on the Sony lot in Culver City.

Cheers, air kisses and hugs awaited the ladies as they filed into a room stuffed with label staff gathered to hear Fifth Harmony’s new album — a mountain of tacos and bottles of tequila and Champagne awaiting them.

Before the music began, acting Epic President Sylvia Rhone led the room in a toast.

“To the baddest ladies in the business — it’s a pleasure to have worked with you guys,” Rhone said, her glass of Champagne hoisted high above her head as the women looked on with glassy eyes, clutching one another’s hands.

“It finally feels like we are living our lives. We’ve taken ownership,” Kordei said. “It’s been there all along, but maybe we weren’t confident enough or bold enough. This time, we’ve got the extra fire … and we don’t care what anyone else has to say.

“I kinda wish it could have been like this all along,” Kordei said with a sigh.

Jauregui, unarguably Fifth Harmony’s most outspoken member — she’s the first to admit group members barely listen to their earlier work — takes a bolder stance.

“We would have freaking dominated,” she said.

Caught Up In You 1

Pairing: Eggsy Unwin x Reader

Warning: Swearing, Stalking, Angst, Sass, Anxiety, potential life of death situations. I’m not really sure. But it’ll have cute fluffy pieces too.

Being famous isn’t always a piece of cake, sometimes you down right regret it. when a fan starts sending you frightening letters, claiming his love for you, and declaring you as his property when you’re about to start your Europe tour. Your manager and tour team start making calls to get you help. When a man shows up asking for the details of the stalker, things he’s sent, the letters, pictures.
The Kingsman agree to help you out, sending Eggsy and Merlin to your aid. When you and Eggsy start to get close, the media starts running a whirl wind of rumors. Sending your stalker on a new craze and Eggsy’s boss on a rampage. Will Eggsy keep you safe, or will you continue to regret your career choice??
 

Keep reading

WLW TV Recommendations for Everyone Sick of the BYG Trope

So, I know that most of us are tired of the representation we get and of wlw characters getting constantly killed off. I wanted to write a post about all the shows that don’t fall into this trap - I have included three shows that do at some point kill off a wlw, however this is either because - in the case of the first two - almost all of the main characters are wlw and the deaths aren’t particularly offensive, or - in the last one - the death is irrelevant, doesn’t have to be watched + and doesn’t have to affect the story (…I’ll explain later, it’ll be in my second post). This post will focus on wlw-centric shows, and then I’ll be making future posts on shows with one or more main wlw character, and then shows with side wlw characters.

WLW-Centric Shows

Shows which feature majority wlw characters and/or explore primarily wlw themes.

Banana

Drama. Banana is the counterpart to C4′s Cucumber (a drama about a group of gay men living in Manchester) - it consists of 8 25-minute episodes, each focusing on a different character, all of whom are LGBT+. Three focus on mlm, four on wlw, and one on a straight trans woman. All of them vary in tone and offer very different topics. Most of the characters also appear in Cucumber as side characters or guest stars, and vice versa. How good is the representation? Much more racially diverse than most of the shows on this list (unfortunately) with around half of the episodes focusing at least partly on POC. Some sensitive portrayals of living with mental illness and taking care of someone with a disability. Could use more bi/pan characters - as far as I know none of the primary characters are bi/pan, though there is a main bi guy in Cucumber who appears as a side character in Banana. Status: Completed.  Where can I watch it? If you live in the UK, it’s available on 4OD. It’s also pretty easy to find links online.

Faking It

Comedy. Faking It starts off with a potentially offensive premise - in a hilariously liberal high school in Texas, two best friends are mistaken for a couple and decide to keep up the facade once they realise it’ll gain them popularity. However, by the end of the pilot, one of the girls has realised she has feelings for her best friend and from there on out the show becomes about her getting to grips with her identity, and the relationship between the two girls. The first season is the best, and unfortunately after that its original premise starts to get somewhat watered down as it tries to be an ensemble show - however that ensemble features a gay guy and an intersex girl, and side characters include a number of gay and bi girls, gay guys, a trans guy, and a bi guy (there’s also an asexual who pops up for about two seconds). Both Karma and Amy, our love interests slash best friends, are confirmed by the writers to be wlw, but unfortunately the show was cancelled before one of them could come to terms with her sexuality. How good is the representation? There’s a lot of representation but it’s not always handled in the best way! A number of characters express overt biphobia and aren’t always called out on it - bizarrely, considering Karma + Amy are both portrayed to be bi/pan. Mostly white cast. Status: Completed. Where can I watch it? Super easy to find links online!

Lip Service

Drama. Lip Service follows a group of WLW living in Scotland. It’s basically the less offensive, British version of The L Word. I don’t see it mentioned much and yet it’s one of the gayest shows out there so you should definitely give it a go! There is a character death in S2 and it’s unfortunately when the character is feeling happy about a love interest, but I’m giving it a pass since literally all of the main characters are wlw. How good is the representation? As you can see, the show is overwhelmingly white. There is also very little bi rep - all of the main WLW are lesbians apart from one whom I’m not sure whether is gay or bi, and only one bi love interest. The characters are also all cis. Status: Completed.  Where can I watch it? Easy to find links online.

South of Nowhere

Drama. South of Nowhere follows a relatively conservative family who move to LA, but its primary narrative is the romantic relationship between their teenage daughter Spencer, and the new girl she meets, Ashley. It’s soapy and often over-the-top, but the relationship between the two girls is well-done. It’s also one of the only shows where the WLW couple get a very overtly happy ending. How good is the representation? Throughout the first two seasons there’s a well-done narrative about police brutality against black people and the alienation of being a black kid in a white family (Spencer’s brother, Clay, is adopted) but they unfortunately end that narrative pretty badly. The portrayal of Ashley’s sexuality isn’t great in that, after seeing all 3 seasons, she seems to be pretty clearly bisexual and yet very often refers to herself as gay - however, this is a mid-00s show so I’ll forgive them. Status: Completed.  Where can I watch it? Easy to find links online.

Sugar Rush

Comedy. Sugar Rush takes place in Brighton and follows 15-year-old ‘queer virgin’ Kim, as she navigates coming to terms with her lesbian identity, her infatuation with her straight best friend, and her eccentric family. It’s super fun and light and basically the diary-style teen comedy young wlw need (you’ll enjoy it if you’re older, too!) How good is the representation? The cast is largely white (sensing a theme here), and Kim definitely displays some biphobia (I can’t remember whether she gets over that or not) as well as making some immoral decisions (afaik these are portrayed as such though). Overall it’s pretty good for something released in 2004. Status: Completed. Where can I watch it? It can be a tricky one to find but I’ve personally had good luck with DailyMotion. DVDs are available.

The L Word

Drama. The most classic of all WLW shows, The L Word follows a group of WLW living in LA and generally having a lot of sex and getting into a lot of drama. It has a lot of issues but if you still feel able to watch is a lot of fun and super addictive. How good is the representation? The first 2 seasons are great in terms of bi rep, but bizarrely and unfortunately the show becomes super biphobic as it goes on. It can also unfortunately be very transphobic (this will be expanded upon in the triggers section). Again, very white. Two wlw characters are killed off but I’m giving it a pass because everyone’s a wlw. Status: Completed.  Where can I watch it? Should be easy to find links anywhere online! DVDs are available.

Transparent

Dramedy. Transparent follows a Jewish LA family after the father comes out as a trans woman - three of the five main characters (pictured above) are WLW, and the focus of the show is on how all of these characters relate to their own genders and sexualities and how that affects their relationships with another. It’s a beautiful, poignant slice-of-life show. How good is the representation? The main trans woman is played by a cis man, which is a con, but all of the trans female side characters are played by trans women. The bisexual wlw never says the word bisexual, and I personally feel they could’ve gone into more depth regarding one character’s realisation of her sexual identity - however, this is really a cut above the rest. Frustratingly, also mostly white. There’s a potentially very triggering scene regarding a trans woman character - as a cis woman I’m not sure I can say whether it’s offensive or not, but I’ll explain more in the triggers section. Status: Still Airing. Where can I watch it? On Amazon Prime, otherwise, it’s easy to find links online.

You Me Her

Comedy. You Me Her explores the polyamorous relationship between two bi/pan women and one straight man. I’ve yet to see it but I hear that it’s well done and a sensitive portrayal of bi/pansexuality and polyamory. Status: Still Airing. Where can I watch it? Easy to find links online.

Please let me know if you need help finding the shows, and if you watch them and enjoy them! Trigger warnings are below the read more (will contain spoilers).

Keep reading

Ask: Okay so I know I’m submitting your own art to you but it’s just so I could ask a question and to make sure you knew what I was talking about.
What exactly is the teddy version of England? My friend posted the reference picture of six different types of Arthur on a discord server and I was wondering if you could explain it.


Me: Sure thing. So Teddy Boy is a British SubCulture that pop up during the 1950′s it’s kinda like the British version of Rockabilly but with Edwardian fashion. 

anonymous asked:

Will Marvel ever use Captain Britain in the movies?

I sure hope so! I would love a ‘Captain Britain’ movie in phase 4. So long as they don’t water down the British-ness. The success of ‘Kingsman: Secret Service’ really got my hopes up for a Captain Britain movie as the tone would be very similar. Many people who aren’t familiar with the character think he’s just a British version of Captain America but they are similar in name only. 

A Captain Britain movie could have everything - action, humor, superpowers, secret agents, magic, dimension hopping. It’s like James Bond meets Doctor Who meets Harry Potter with superpowers thrown in. They could utilise British attractions and culture similar to how the ‘Kingsman 2′ trailer has done with the black cab chase scene. It could be really great and honestly I would welcome more MCU movies not set in the US.

Also, the soundtrack would be amazing. Just use iconic songs from British rock bands like Sex Pistols, Led Zeppelin, The Rolling Stones, Queen, Pink Floyd, Dire Straits, The Who, The Kinks, The Clash etc. Basically writes itself. 

modern outsiders headcanons

sry there are so many, i am trash for this

-two-bit nd ponyboy have seen every episode of friends…twice
-one time a girl made soda watch titanic on a date since he’d never seen it nd he complained nd rolled his eyes, but by the end soda had cried harder than her
-darry has the side eye nd “jim halpert looking at the camera” face perfected
-dally nd johnny like watching the teen titans go cartoon together
-steve actually loves horror movies nd constantly makes evie watch them with him
-steve nd soda are trying to make it big on vine
-johnny is a film fanatic nd always appreciates good directing nd cinematography
-ponyboy went through a percy jackson phase
-dallas is the only one who didn’t cry when the gang watched up (darry won’t admit he cried, but he did)
-darry also shed a few tears during inside out bc he’s feeling the pain of growing up so strongly, but he’ll never admit it
-sodapop nd johnny love scooby-doo especially the older ones
-cherry has dressed up as black widow nd daphne before for halloween
-sometimes people compare cherry to kat stratford nd she’s one hundred percent ok with that
-two-bit started panicking when hostess went out of business nd was SO relived when they made a comeback
-sodapop knows every word to worth it by fifth harmony
-johnny has watched the oscars at the curtis’s every year for as long as he can remember nd he always writes down his predictions/what or who he wants to win
-evie is a huge fan of halsey, marina nd the diamonds nd haim
-dallas knows almost every word to legend by drake nd sometimes when he’s driving alone, he’ll blast it nd maybe sing along a bit
-sodapop’s favorite disney movie is peter pan
-ponyboy is jealous of anyone who can find their name on a coca-cola bottle so once johnny handed him one can that said “share a coke with a dreamer” nd another that said “share a coke with a superstar”. it made pony’s week
-darry’s guilty pleasures are family feud nd house hunters (international)
-all the curtis boys are amy winehouse fans bc of their mother
-steve loves top gear (the british version) bc there’s lots of cool cars nd it also makes him laugh his ass off. two-bit likes watching it with him too sometimes
-darry sometimes gets too into football games when they watch them
-steve likes clueless nd knows the lines in it more than he’ll ever admit bc it’s one of evie’s favorite movies
-fight club is the only movie dallas rly, rly liked
-cherry is all abt those high-waisted skirts
-two-bit, steve nd soda all rly liked wizards of waverly place
-darry can’t stand meghan trainor (actually none of the gang can, but darry finds her most unbearable)
-ponyboy has like 48275 pictures of sunsets on his phone nd half his instagram feed is sunsets
-steve has an android bc he actually believes they’re better than iphones
-johnny loves eating at olive garden nd getting all the free breadsticks (once he nd two-but tried to sneak some out)
-darry doesn’t understand half the slang the rest of the boys use so he usually just raises his eyebrows nd nods
-steve is jealous of evie’s crushes on zayn nd tyler posey
-evie makes steve watch teen wolf with her when sylvia is unavailable
-evie nd slyvia give each other makeup tips nd look up makeup tutorials together so both of them always look absolutely amazing
-sylvia is a fan of bikini kill nd girlpool
-sodapop nd two-bit believe in aliens nd are always watching conspiracy documentaries or the x files
-ponyboy almost never gets off netflix unless he feels like reading instead
-dallas’s guilty pleasures are the movie heathers nd nicki minaj songs
-steve woke sodapop up on his seventeenth birthday by blasting dancing queen by abba nd singing along while dancing on soda’s bed
-ponyboy thinks rachel shouldn’t have gotten off the plane
-johnny’s favorite book is to kill a mockingbird nd he read the sequel the day it came out
-darry read all the hardy boys books when he was younger
-ponyboy used to love the magic treehouse books
-cherry is excited af for wonder woman in the batman vs superman movie nd also for the just wonder woman movie
-evie nd slyvia also watch project runway together
-two-bit, steve nd darry are the only ones who rly like superhero movies
-dally was jokingly going to vote for donald trump, but darry nd ponyboy talked some sense into him (thank god) nd now he’s reluctantly voting for bernie sanders along with everyone else
-sodapop also knows all the words to gimme more by britney spears
-one time when they were younger, steve nd soda did this whole routine to wannabe by the spice girls nd mrs.curtis filmed the whole thing
-two-bit nd dallas are actually huge star wars fans
-ponyboy thinks arctic monkeys are overrated
-sylvia wishes she could be on the same level as rihanna
-ponyboy nd johnny love christmas movies
-the whole gang likes to watch the office together
-when a preteen first discovering cologne/body spray, dally always put on too much axe
-darry never likes memes but when two-bit first showed him this john cena one, he almost fell out of his chair he was laughing so hard