british sovereign

HM’s full title

Her Majesty Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas Queen, Defender of the Faith, Duchess of Edinburgh, Countess of Merioneth, Baroness Greenwich, Duke of Lancaster, Lord of Mann, Duke of Normandy, Sovereign of the Most Honourable Order of the Garter, Sovereign of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Sovereign of the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, Sovereign of the Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick, Sovereign of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Sovereign of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, Sovereign of the Distinguished Service Order, Sovereign of the Imperial Service Order, Sovereign of the Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Sovereign of the Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, Sovereign of the Order of British India, Sovereign of the Indian Order of Merit, Sovereign of the Order of Burma, Sovereign of the Royal Order of Victoria and Albert, Sovereign of the Royal Family Order of King Edward VII, Sovereign of the Order of Merit, Sovereign of the Order of the Companions of Honour, Sovereign of the Royal Victorian Order, Sovereign of the Most Venerable Order of the Hospital of St John of Jerusalem.

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God save the Queen

Her Majesty Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas Queen, Defender of the Faith, Duchess of Edinburgh, Countess of Merioneth, Baroness Greenwich, Duke of Lancaster, Lord of Mann, Duke of Normandy, Sovereign of the Most Honourable Order of the Garter, Sovereign of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Sovereign of the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, Sovereign of the Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick, Sovereign of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Sovereign of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, Sovereign of the Distinguished Service Order, Sovereign of the Imperial Service Order, Sovereign of the Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Sovereign of the Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, Sovereign of the Order of British India, Sovereign of the Indian Order of Merit, Sovereign of the Order of Burma, Sovereign of the Royal Order of Victoria and Albert, Sovereign of the Royal Family Order of King Edward VII, Sovereign of the Order of Merit, Sovereign of the Order of the Companions of Honour, Sovereign of the Royal Victorian Order, Sovereign of the Most Venerable Order of the Hospital of St John of Jerusalem.

6 February 1952 - and counting

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Princess Royal

“Princess royal” is the title given to the eldest daughter of the British Sovereign, once bestowed it is for life.
It is Queen Henrietta wife of King Charles I who created the title for their daughter Princess Mary in 1642. The English Queen, née Princess of France wanted to bring in Engand, the French tradition of naming the eldest daughter of the King “Madame Royal”.  “Princess Royal” was chosen as its equivalent.
Princess Mary the first to hold this title died in 1660 and it is only until 1727 that the title was again used, it was for the eldest daughter of King George II and Queen Caroline, Princess Anne who married William Prince of Orange, granted at the age of 18 she hold it until her death in 1759. Next was Princess Charotte daughter of King George III and Queen Caroline, who died in 1828.
The fourth Princess Royal, was Queen Victoria and Prince Albert first child, Princess Victoria, bestowed by the title at the age of one year old, she died from cancer in 1901. And it is her niece who became Princess Royal in 1905, Princess Louise also Duchess of Fife, passed away in 1931 the year after Princess Mary only daughter of King George VI and Queen Mary, was became Princess Royal, until her death in 1965.
Princess Anne currently holds the title conferred it in 1987 by her mother Queen Elizabeth II.

She’s so dedicated and really determined to finish everything she’s started. She’ll want to hand over knowing she’s done everything she possibly could to help and that she’s got no regrets and no unfinished business; that she’s done everything she can for the country and that she’s not let anyone down – she minds an awful lot about that.
—  The Duke of Cambridge about his grandmother, The Queen.
Gather round royal fans...

I think we need a refresher about how royal finances work. 

Money spent on royal buildings comes from the Sovereign Grant. The amount of money the Queen gets is based on the yearly revenue from the Crown Estate. She doesn’t ask the government for money as and when she needs it, and she doesn’t get to decide how much she gets. They give her a lump sum and she spends it how she likes. 

So when people say a certain royal spent x amount of money on something, this is not new money. This money had already been given to the Queen to spend how she sees fit. For example, let’s pretend Harry said that his house was falling apart and it needed renovations of £2million. That £2million would come from the taxpayer. But it would come from money that the Queen would have received from us no matter what. It was always going to be spent on something. I think people are under the impression that royals ask for £2million which is being taken away from schools or hospitals and given to them. It isn’t. It is money that the Queen always had in her possession, money she can choose how to spend, and money that would always have been spent one way or another. Now I am not saying whether I agree with spending quite that much money on renovations but I think people should understand how it works.

anonymous asked:

Why is it that in the English monarchy they can change their name they choose to rule in when they come into the throne?

Thanks for the question, Anon.

Do you mean why some British monarchs have chosen different regnal names than their first given names? As a general rule, while an English (or, rather now, British) monarch can choose a name under which to rule, most have stuck with their first baptismal names. Such changes only happened in three circumstances - almost in a row - and all in the last two centuries.

The first was Queen Victoria, who herself already had an unusual name - a (then, in England) very rare adaptation of her mother’s name, Victoire. When the child of the Duke and Duchess of Kent was born, the original plan was to name her Victoire Georgiana Alexandrina Charlotte Augusta, after her mother and her four sponsors (the Prince Regent, later King George IV; Tsar Alexander I of Russia; her paternal aunt Charlotte, formerly Princess Royal and then Dowager Queen of Wurttemberg; and her maternal grandmother Augusta, the Dowager Duchess of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfield). The Prince Regent, however, refused to allow his niece to have the typical royal names of Charlotte and Augusta, and declared that he could not have his name come before that of the Russian Emperor and would not sit for it coming behind. When, at the christening, the Prince Regent declared the child’s name Alexandrina, the Duke of Kent suggested adding another name, like Elizabeth; the prince refused, and instead said to “give her the mother’s name, then; but it cannot precede that of the Emperor”. Victoria was indeed known as “Drina” among some family members in her earliest years, but eventually came to be known simply as “Victoria”. (Interestingly, in 1831, the British government, with the king’s approval, suggested changing Victoria’s name to Charlotte or Elizabeth - more amenable to the public as names for a future sovereign, and in the former case the name of Victoria’s publicly beloved cousin, Princess Charlotte of Wales, who had been heiress to the throne until her death in childbirth a few years before Victoria’s birth. The Duchess of Kent initially agreed, but upon further consideration told Lord Grey that it would be “quite contrary” to her and Victoria’s feelings if the king persisted in wishing to change Victoria’s name. According to Victoria, writing after the fact, Lord Grey and the Archbishop of Canterbury felt that the public had come to know Victoria as “Victoria”, and thus agreed with the Duchess that her name should not be changed.)

Victoria herself had four sons (as well as five daughters), and named her eldest son and heir Albert Edward. Not content with naming her son after her beloved husband, she also wished the Prince of Wales to rule as “King Albert Edward” when he came into the throne (though no English or British sovereign has ever taken a double regnal name, unlike, say, two Kings of Italy and two Popes). “Bertie”, as he was known all his life, had very different ideas, and when he came into his throne declared publicly that he wished to rule only as Edward. He would not “undervalue the name of Albert”, inherited “from my ever to be lamented, great and wise Father” (who at this point had been dead for nearly half a century, and whose death Victoria had always blamed on Bertie himself); instead, he desired that the name of Albert “should stand alone”. Whether or not he personally desired to separate himself from the ever-moralizing and stuffy father who had roundly censured him after his first affair - and the mother who thought of him as a disappointment - is not recorded.

Bertie named his second son George, who eventually succeeded to the throne as King George V (his elder son, Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence, died before his father ascended the throne). George’s two oldest sons were Edward (who was called “David” in the family, after the last of his given names; his last four baptismal names were the names of the patron saints of England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales, respectively), and Albert (christened Albert Frederick Arthur George). When Edward succeeded (as Edward VIII) and then abdicated in favor of his brother, Albert took as his regnal name “George”. In doing so, the new King George VI hoped to imply continuity with his respected father and restore confidence in the monarchy, deeply shaken by the abdication crisis of Edward.

As a mildly interesting last note, when our current Queen Elizabeth (who was christened “Elizabeth Alexandra Mary”) was asked what regnal name she would like to use, she is said to have replied “Why, my own, of course. What else?”

I’m glad you asked this, Anon; this is a subject I love nerding out about, as you can tell.

The Queen Regent (NFriel)

anonymous asked:

Hello Zoe! Can you explain to me what's the fuzz all about Brexit (in layman's term pls)? What's your stand in this issue?

Most of the posts you will see online are angry at the outcome of the EU referendum, so I’m assuming you’re asking why everyone is upset? I’m not an expert but this is what I’ve gathered so far…

Here are a few (of many reasons) why people think that leaving the EU will be bad for the UK, and for the EU. 

1. Cultural diversity is something that makes the UK what it is, and as someone who has lived in London I can say that the reason why so many talented and valuable people immigrate to London (/ the UK in general) is because they believe that it is a welcoming place (or was on its way to becoming one) for immigrants. The diverse culture is also a reason why people go to study at universities in the UK, and why they are such great institutions in the first place through embracing a global view. Modern Britain is a result of immigration. Immigrants have contributed much more to the UK than what many argue they have taken away financially. In this day and age, it has ceased to be the norm for people to  define themselves by a single country or homeland; many people simply identify as European and the referendum outcome has sadly failed to reflect that. 

2. The Free Movement of People is enshrined in EU law and gives many people an opportunity to work in the UK (and vice versa, for British nationals to work in other Member States). For example, the NHS (public healthcare) workforce is ¼ people from other Member States…this part scares me especially. Although leaving the EU doesn’t mean EU nationals will not be able to work in the UK, it will definitely not make it any easier, and leaves a lot of futures uncertain. 

3. Some people who argue for Brexit base their assertions on ‘British Sovereignity’, which is ridiculous and archaic. The referendum was a pivotal moment to show solidarity over hostility, and I’m shocked that sovereignty is even an argument…its kind of another way of saying ‘Make Britain Great Again’. 

4. A lot of positive environmental policies in the UK are the result of being in the EU, such as regulations to do with air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. The EU provides Member States with a legal framework to implement policies (waste management and toxic substances to name a few more) and I don’t have to explain why this is a good thing. 

5. Leaving the EU could trigger a recession. Today, the pound dropped to the lowest its been in the last 30(? I believe) years. Many argue that the older generations (who mostly voted to leave the EU) have voted to leave behind a mess for the younger generation (who mostly voted to remain) to clean up. This is especially important given graduates and people under 30 will be statistically more heavily impacted by a recession. Furthermore, leaving the EU will not happen overnight; by Article 50 of the Treaty of Lisbon the UK must give a 2 year notice period during which the terms of exit and plans for the future will be sorted out, and it may take up to a decade for renegotiations to bear fruit; this will lead to a stand still or ‘limbo’ period and diminish remaining confidence in the UK market. 

6. Regarding the GCC, many argue that Brexit will shift attention from the Middle East peace process to trade in the MENA region to boost the unstable UK economy (which we see evidence of today). Read more about this point here

7. As a student especially interested in Intellectual Property law, Brexit would probably result in a lot of administrative complexities; the UK would have to figure out its path with regards to EU unitary patent (UPS) and trademark (EUTM) schemes that would have made life a lot easier by granting protection for all EU Member States via a simplified process. Other areas of law such as competition and employment are based on legislation heavily derived from EU law, and this is going to be a tumultuous process to say the least. 

I hope this makes it a bit easier…keep in mind that there are also many other valid reasons why people want to leave, but I’m with the ‘remain’ side hence the focus on the above points. You can search them up online if you want to know more.