british king

  • King George III: It's not easy being British
  • King George III: The reason being it is impossible for me, as a British person, to walk into any museum, in any nation on the planet earth, without, within five minutes, start to feel guilty.
  • King George III: You have no idea what that feels like!
  • King George III: (to americans) You will, OH, you will!
  • King George III: One day all this shame will be yours my American friends

Quotes that are NOT Shakespeare:

1. How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. (Elizabeth Barrett Browning)

2. When I saw you I fell in love and you smiled because you knew (Arrigo Boito)

3. Expectation is the root of all heartache (unknown, but not Shakespeare)

Quotes that ARE Shakespeare:

1. Fie, foh, and fum / I smell the blood of a British man. (King Lear)

2. If you can mock a leek, you can eat a leek. (Henry V)

3. I’ll do it in my shirt (Love’s Labour’s Lost)

Conclusion: ????

Check your goddamn sources and revel in the fact that real Shakespeare is far more entertaining than faux Shakespeare.

3

The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, New York, July 31, 1924

What this article fails to mention is that Lois Sturt supposedly had a passenger in the car when she was pulled over - the Prince of Wales, future King Edward VIII.

The lower image, from the Springfield Missouri Republican, August 31, 1924, shows the future king playing “Chasing Clues” and slumming with a Tallulah Bankhead.

6

02/04/2017: Queen Maxima and King Willem Alexander of the Netherlands, Princess Catharina Amalia of the Netherlands, Princess Beatrice of York, Queen Anne-Marie and King Constantine of Greece, Crown Prince Pavlos and Crown Princess Marie Chantal of Greece, Princess Maria Olympia, Prince Nikolaos of Greece, and former Queen Sofia of Spain attended the wedding of Filippos Lemos and Marianna Goulandris in London, England. Marie Chantal and Pavlos’ son, Prince Odysseus-Kimon, also served as a ring bearer in the wedding. Princesses Alexia and Ariane of the Netherlands also served as flower girls. .

2

Celtic Coin of the Dobunni King Corio

This is a ‘Tree Type’ gold stater of the Dobunni tribe. It was struck circa 20 BC  to AD 5 during the rule of Corio. On the obverse is the image of a tree-like emblem known as a Dobunnic Tree, with a pellet below. The reverse bears the name Co[rio] above a triple-tailed, stylized Celtic horse, with a wheel below and other symbols in the field.  The Dobunnic Tree’s meaning is unclear although corn, ferns and a form of a wreath have all been suggested as explanations.

The Dobunni were one of the Iron Age tribes living in the British Isles prior to the Roman invasion of Britain (43-84 AD). They lived in the southwestern part of Britain that roughly coincides with the English counties of Bristol, Gloucestershire and the north of Somerset, although at times their territory may have extended into parts of what are now Herefordshire, Oxfordshire, Wiltshire, Worcestershire, and Warwickshire. Their capital acquired the Roman name of Corinium Dobunnorum, which is today known as Cirencester. Unlike the Silures, their neighbors in what later became southeast Wales, the Dobunni were not a warlike people and submitted to the Romans before they even reached their lands. Afterwards they readily adopted the Romano-British lifestyle.

Corio was a 'king’ of the southwestern Dobunni. No one knows if 'king’ is the correct term for their leaders however, it is likely that this is what the Romans called them. The Dobunni rulers are only known from names found on their coinage and the exact order of each of their reigns has yet to be determined. Some of the other Dobunni kings’ names are Anted, Eisu, Aatti, Comux, Inham and Bodvoc.

King’s College Chapel, Cambridge, United Kingdom