british columbia

news1130.com
KKK flyers popping up in Chilliwack (Canada)
Some people woke up to find Ku Klux Klan recruitment flyers at the end of their driveways.

It seems a trend happening in the United States has shown up in Chilliwack.

Some people woke up to find Ku Klux Klan recruitment flyers at the end of their driveways.

“At the end of the driveway and in the bag was a bunch of rice, and there was also this sheet of white paper. I was curious so I opened it up, and it was this Ku Klux Klan propaganda,” says Cameron, who lived in Sardis.

There were no other flyers left at any other houses on his street. He’s not sure why he was chosen, but he wasn’t alone.

Cameron says he heard from other Chilliwack residents on Facebook who found similar flyers.

“There’s this sort of memo thing that landed on their driveways as well.”

RCMP won’t confirm if they’re investigating this particular flyers, but say there is an investigation into “flyers”.

KKK flyers have been showing up in several American cities over the last week as well.

vancouversun.com
Coquitlam apartment fire leaves 50 Syrian refugees homeless
Coquitlam Mayor Richard Stewart said the fire was started by a plumber doing repair work in one of the suites. While the plumber suffered minor burns, no one else was injured, he said.

About 50 Syrian refugees, one of whom was the victim of a pepper-spray attack in January, are homeless after a fire tore through their Coquitlam apartment block late Thursday morning.

Resident Ahmed Shakh Mussa said he was awakened around 10:30 a.m. by someone banging on the door, telling him  to leave the building.

He and dozens of others then watched as thick plumes of black smoke billowed from the roof of the only home they have ever known in Canada.

Many of the people cried as they watched the building burn, said Mariam Abadzid, who lives in another apartment block in the complex.

Coquitlam Mayor Richard Stewart said the fire was started by a plumber doing repair work in one of the suites. While the plumber suffered minor burns, no one else was injured, he said.

A total of about 200 people were evacuated from the building, Stewart added, but it was only the one block of about 12 units that was destroyed by the fire. It’s unclear when the other 150 residents will be able to return to their units.

Stewart described the residences as “tinder-dry, very old buildings.

“I’m astounded that the fire department could extinguish it and protect the other three sections (of the building).”

The refugee families were staying in the complex because Concert Properties, which is developing the site as a new highrise, offered up units in the existing 60-year-old building for refugees to stay in for their first year in Canada.

The displaced families went to an evacuation centre near the Poirier recreation centre, and will be put up in hotels for at least three nights by the city, Stewart said.

“After that, we’ll be looking for a longer-term solution. We’re trying to locate buildings in the same situation as this one, partly empty for whatever reason. We’ll look everywhere to identify a solution.”

The Immigrant Services Society of B.C., which was responsible for housing 1,564 government-assisted Syrian refugees who have arrived in Metro Vancouver since November, will also be involved in finding replacement housing for those displaced by the fire, said Kathy Sherrell, associate director of settlement services.

But NDP MLA Selina Robinson said this will be a challenge because the housing complex the refugees were staying in was the last affordable housing complex in the area.

“There’s no place to go,” said Robinson, adding that there has been no recognition by either the provincial Liberals or the municipal government that “this precious rental stock was being eroded.

“There had been hundreds of affordable housing units in that area, but they’ve been coming down because of (new development along) the Evergreen (SkyTrain) Line.”

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pressprogress.ca
Christy Clark skipped human rights vote for a secret fundraiser, but went to the photo op anyway
Is BC Premier Christy Clark trying to take credit for something she didn't actually do?

Did BC Premier Christy Clark try to take credit for something she didn’t actually do?

On Monday, Clark bailed on voting for an important bill recognizing “gender identity or expression” in the province’s Human Rights Code.

Where did she go? According to the premier’s office, Clark missed the vote because she had to go to Vancouver for a secret BC Liberal fundraiser.

But if you want more details, you’re out of luck – the BC Liberals won’t say where the fundraiser took place or who Clark was hitting up for money, telling reporters they’ll need to wait until next year to find out:

But if the premier was too busy raising money for the BC Liberals to actually show up and vote on a matter of human rights, she didn’t seem to mind participating in the photo op.

Although she was nowhere to be found when votes were cast Monday evening at the BC Legislature, Clark was all smiles for cameras on the front steps of the Legislature Monday morning alongside “human rights advocates and community members.”

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dawsoncreekmirror.ca
Site C critics ‘disappointed’ by Trudeau Site C approvals
Critics of the dam say the approval quashes any hopes they had of the new government delaying or further reviewing Site C.
By Jonny Wakefield

Justin Trudeau’s government has authorized its first set of Site C permits, allowing construction to continue on the controversial $8.8 billion project.

Critics of the dam say the approval quashes any hopes they had of the new government delaying or further reviewing Site C.

“Up until now, the Trudeau government had not issued a permit on this project,” Ken Boon, a Peace Valley farmer and opponent of the project said in an interview.

The permits allow BC Hydro to block the flow of the Peace River and disrupt fisheries—activities which require federal approval. The initial permits needed for construction were issued under Prime Minister Stephen Harper. The B.C. government approved Site C in Dec. 2014.  

“It’s very disappointing,” Boon said. “There was somewhat of a delay happening under the Trudeau government as far as issuing these permits, and we took that as a positive sign that they were looking at this more seriously.”

Boon said the new permits amount to a stamp of approval from the new government, which promised to renew a “nation-to-nation” relationship between Ottawa and First Nations.

The West Moberly and Prophet River First Nations continue to challenge the project in court, saying flooding the Peace River Valley will disrupt their ability to exercise Treaty rights. The two nations will be in federal court in Montreal this September.

“This looks like they’re breaking their promises to First Nations people on a renewed relationship. It is very disappointing,” Boon said.  

Site C will generate around 1,100 megawatts of electricity and flood 83 kilometres of the Peace River Valley.