british and american

A member of the Royal Artillery observes the effect of his battery’s bombardment on rebel positions in Charlestown, South Carolina, 1780. The subsequent surrender of Charlestown’s five thousand-strong Continental Army garrison was the worst defeat suffered by the Patriots during the Revolutionary War.

How to ... with someone who is Deaf / Hard of Hearing (HoH)

Communicate with a Deaf/HoH Person

DO:

Ask them their preferred method of communicating (paper & pen, voiced, Sign language)

Don’t:

Assume just because they’re d/Deaf/HoH that they all know Sign Language.

DO:

Face them when speaking as most d/Deaf/HoH lip read. Body language/facial expression is important too.

Don’t:

Face away, cover mouth, exaggerate on lip movement, chew while talking.

DO:

Talk to them normally, just like anyone else. We are normal human beings, we just can’t hear.

Don’t:
YELL, Talk slow with exaggerating lip movements, as if they are ‘stupid’

DO:

If they ask you to repeat, do so. If they ask from a specific point, don’t repeat the entire sentence, just from the current point on.

Don’t:

say “Never mind” “I’ll tell you later” or ignore them when they ask to repeat. We want to be engaged in the conversation too. Saying “Never mind” is like a swear word to the d/Deaf/HoH Community.

Get Their Attention:

DO:

tapping their shoulder, move hand slightly in their vision view, stomp ground, tap table, or flash light (most common in group setting)

Don’t:

Shake them madly, wave your hands wildly in their vision view, or flicker lights rapidly.

Deaf and Hard Of Hearing People are just like everyone else, we just can’t hear. We are capable of doing anything/everything a hearing person can. 

sam cant actually fly, hes just so annoying the earth repels him

12 Reasons To Learn (American) Sign Language

1. Easily communicate UNDERWATER

2. You can talk when your MOUTH is FULL

3. Understand and help end AUDISM

4. Speak right through a CLOSED WINDOW and still be understood.

5. Talk across a CROWDED ROOM without yelling

6. Quietly chat at the MOVIES without being rude

7. Learn a language that’s UNIQUE VISUAL SPATIAL & GESTURAL

8. COUNT to TEN and HIGHER on just ONE hand

9 It’s a 3D language - 3D GLASSES NOT NEEDED

10. Satisfy your FOREIGN LANGUAGE requirement 

11 It will never be TOO LOUD or TOO QUIET to sign to someone

12 Get to know some wonderful people in the DEAF COMMUNITY (Possibly the best reason of all!)

2

February 9th 1964: Beatles on Ed Sullivan

On this day in 1964, the British band the Beatles made their first appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show in the USA. This performance, watched by a record 73 million - which accounted for around 40% of the American population at the time - began the so-called ‘British Invasion’ when British music made its mark on America. On February 7th 1964, the Beatles had arrived at New York’s John F. Kennedy airport to a crowd of over 4,000 fans. The band was beginning to take off in America, with their hit ‘I Want to Hold Your Hand’ having risen to number 1 in the charts. On the Ed Sullivan Show, two days after their arrival, the four-man band from Liverpool performed hits such as ‘All My Loving’ and ‘She Loves You’. The Beatles were already popular in their native Britain, but their success in America forever established them as a world famous musical sensation. The performance on the Ed Sullivan Show is credited with beginning the worldwide spread of ‘Beatlemania’.

The Army of Immigrants

Records of men who camped at Valley Forge, expose the myth of farmers throwing down their plows to fight for land they’d owned for generations.

Enlisted ranks were largely landless men in their teens or early twenties, unmarried and poor.  The army offered steady wage, food, whiskey, and clothes, so patriotism was not often the driving factor of their enlistment.  A study of 710 New Jersey Continentals showed almost all came from lower economic classes and only a small number had a profession at all.

In addition to being landless, most were not American-born. Before the revolution, over 300,000 Irish had immigrated to North America, and their bitterness of British oppression helped lead the drive for independence. In most New England Continental regiments, 10-20% of the men had Irish surnames, and in middle states that percentage was consistently higher. Units from Maryland, New Jersey, and Delaware were usually around 45% Irish. In The First Pennsylvania, 315 of 660 men were Irish-born and another 215 listed “America” as their place of birth, likely second-generation immigrants.  

After the Irish, German-born men held the second-largest percentage, making up somewhere from 10-20% of the rank-and-file soldiers at Valley Forge.  They were the largest ethnic group in the United States at the time, mostly settled in New York and Pennsylvania.  

Additionally, almost 10% of Washington’s army, camped at Valley Forge, was made up of African or African American soldiers.  Many enlisted voluntarily, but it’s true that some were given as bounty for their masters to avoid enlistment.  And, many served through to the end of the war, finding better treatment among enlisted ranks as ‘brother soldiers’.

info from: “No Meat, No Soldier: Race, Class and Ethnicity in the Continental Army” Charles P. Neimeyer