british academy of film and television

7

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2016)

Directed by David Yates

Cinematography by Philippe Rousselot

30 Days Idol Challenge - Bonus Day 10 - & Awards

Day Ten of @devikafernando Challenge brings us “& Awards”


Mr.Hiddleston being such a gifted and talented performer, presenter, and presence on stage made this difficult. So I wrote down all movie/television/theatre award appearances on pieces of paper (there were a lot!), and randomly picked them out of a container.
My cat may or may not have eaten one.

February 2009 Whatsonstage.com Awards
pre:

awards:


January 2012 British Academy Film Awards – Orange Wednesdays

bonus from afterparty february 7, 2012:


Plenty more after the cut!


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10

Alice in Wonderland

46 in x of animated feature film history
Release: Jul. 26th, 1951
Country: USA
Director: Clyde Geronimi, Wilfred Jackson, Hamilton Luske

“On a golden afternoon, young Alice follows a White Rabbit, who disappears down a nearby rabbit hole. Quickly following him, she tumbles into the burrow - and enters the merry, topsy-turvy world of Wonderland. Memorable songs and characters (the Mad Hatter, the Cheshire Cat, Tweedle-Dee and Tweedle-Dum)  highlight Alice’s journey, which culminates in a madcap encounter with the Queen of Hearts - and her army of playing cards.

The history of Walt Disney’s association with Lewis Carroll’s Alice books (Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass) stretches all the way back to his childhood. Like many children of the time he was familiar with them and had read them as a school boy. In 1923, when Disney was still a 21-year-old filmmaker trying to make a name for himself at the Laugh-O-Gram Studio in Kansas City, one of his shorts was Alice’s Wonderland, which was loosely inspired by the Alice books. The short featured a live-action girl (Virginia Davis) interacting in an animated world. Disney left for Hollywood and used the film as a sort of pilot to show to potential distributors. Margaret J. Winkler of Winkler Pictures agreed to distribute the Alice Comedies, and Disney partnered with his older brother Roy O. Disney and re-hired Kansas City co-workers including Ub Iwerks, Rudolph Ising, Friz Freleng, Carman Maxwell and Hugh Harman to form Disney Bros. Studios (later Walt Disney Productions). The series began in 1924 before being retired in 1927.

In 1938, after the enormous success of Snow White, Disney revived the idea of making an Alice feature and officially registered the title Alice in Wonderland with the Motion Picture Association of America and hired storyboard artist Al Perkins and art director David S. Hall to develop the story and concept art for the film. A storyreel was complete in 1939, but Walt was not pleased as he felt that Hall’s drawings resembled original illustrator Tenniel’s drawings too closely and that the overall tone of Perkins’ script was too grotesque and dark. Walt shelved production on Alice in Wonderland shortly after the screening.

In 1945, shortly after the war ended, Disney once again revived Alice in Wonderland and assigned British author Aldous Huxley (Brave New World) to re-write the script. However, Walt felt that Huxley’s version was too much of a literal adaptation of Carroll’s book. Background artist Mary Blair submitted some concept drawings for Alice in Wonderland. Blair’s paintings moved away from Tenniel’s sketchy illustrations by taking a modernist stance, using bold and unreal colors. Walt liked Blair’s designs, and the script was re-written to focus on comedy, music, and the whimsical side to Carroll’s book.

Through various drafts of the script, many sequences that were present in Carroll’s book drifted in and out of the story. This resulted in many characters being written out. The Doorknob was the only character in the film that did not appear in Carroll’s books.

In an effort to retain some of Carroll’s imaginative verses and poems, Disney commissioned top songwriters to compose songs built around them for use in the film. A record number of potential songs were written for the film, based on Carroll’s verses—over 30—and many of them found a way into the film, if only for a few brief moments. The original song that Alice was to sing in the beginning was titled ‘Beyond the Laughing Sky’. However, Kathryn Beaumont had difficulty singing, and it was decided that starting the film off with a slow ballad would be a little risky on audiences. The song, like so many other dropped songs, was not used by the producers. However, the composition was kept and the lyrics were changed. It later became the title song for Peter Pan (which was in production at the same time), ‘The Second Star to the Right’.

At the time, these creative decisions were met with great criticism from Carroll fans, as well as from British film and literary critics who accused Disney of ‘Americanizing’ a great work of English literature. Disney was not surprised by the critical reception to Alice in Wonderland – his version of Alice was intended for large family audiences, not literary critics – but despite all the long years of thought and effort, the film met with a lukewarm response at the box office and was a sharp disappointment in its initial release. This was the first Disney theatrical film to be shown on television, in 1954.

The film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Scoring of a Musical Picture, but lost to An American in Paris.

Almost two decades after its original release, Alice in Wonderland suddenly found itself in vogue with the times. In fact, because of Mary Blair’s art direction and the long-standing association of Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland with drug culture, the feature was re-discovered as something of a ‘head film’ among the college-aged and was shown in various college towns across the country. The Disney company resisted this association, but then, in 1974, the Disney company gave Alice in Wonderland its first theatrical re-release ever. This re-release was so successful it warranted a subsequent re-release in 1981. By the 1980s, the initial consensus of the film proved to be outdated. The film gained critical acclaim and became one of the most popular Disney movies of all time.”

(source)
(source)

9

The Duchess of Cambridge’s Gowns

From November 16, 2010 until April 24, 2017

  1. April 29, 2011- The Wedding
  2. April 29, 2011- The Wedding Dinner
  3. June 9, 2011- ARK Gala
  4. July 9, 2011-Day 2 of Official Visit to Los Angeles: BAFTA “Brits to Watch” Reception
  5. October 13, 2011- 100 Women in Hedge Funds Gala
  6. October 26, 2011-In Kind Direct Charity Event
  7. November 10, 2011- National Memorial Arboretum Dinner
  8. December 19, 2011- Sun Military Awards
  9. January 8, 2012- War Horse Premiere
  10. May 8, 2012- Thirty Club
  11. May 11, 2012- Our Greatest Team Rises Gala
  12. September 13, 2012- Day 1 of Official Visit to Malaysia: Dinner
  13. September 18, 2012- Day 1 of Official Visit to Tuvalu: Traditional Dinner
  14. November 8, 2012-St. Andrews University’s 600th Anniversary Campaign Dinner
  15. December 16, 2012-BBC Sports Personality of the Year Awards
  16. September 12, 2013- Tusk Conservation Awards
  17. October 24, 2013- 100 Women’s Hedge Fund Gala
  18. December 4, 2013- Diplomatic Reception
  19. December 5, 2013-Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom Premiere
  20. December 11, 2013- Natural History Museum Alive 3D Advanced Screening
  21. February 11, 2014- The Portrait Gala at the National Portrait Gallery
  22. October 21, 2014- Wildlife Photographer of the Year Awards
  23. November 13, 2014- Royal Variety Performance
  24. December 9, 2014- Day 3 of Visit to New York: St Andrews 600th Anniversary Dinner
  25. December 14/15, 2014- Friends Wedding
  26. October 20, 2015- State Visit From China: Dinner
  27. October 26, 2015- Spectre Royal Premiere
  28. October 27, 2015- 100 Women in Hedge Funds Gala
  29. December 8, 2015- Diplomatic Reception
  30. April 7, 2016- Reception before India and Bhutan Tour
  31. April 10, 2016- Day 1 of Official Visit to India: Dinner Gala & Reception
  32. April 11, 2016- Day 2 of Official Visit to India: Queen’s Birthday Party
  33. April 12, 2016- Day 3 of Official Visit to India: Bohag Bihu Festival
  34. April 14, 2016- Day 1 of Official Visit to Bhutan: Dinner
  35. April 15, 2016- Day 2 of Official Visit to Bhutan: Reception
  36. April 21, 2016-Queen Elizabeth II’s 90th Birthday Dinner
  37. June 9, 2016- SportsAid’s 40th Anniversary Dinner
  38. June 22, 2016-A Taste of Norfolk Dinner for East Anglia’s Children’s Hospices’ Nook Appeal
  39. July 6, 2016- Art Fund Museum of the Year Award
  40. November 3, 2016- Recovery Street Film Festival; A Street Cat Named Bob Premiere
  41. December 8, 2016- Diplomatic Reception
  42. February 12, 2017- British Academy of Film and Television Awards
  43. March 17, 2017- Day 1 of Official Visit to Paris: Gala Dinner
  44. March 28, 2017- 2017 Portrait Gala at the National Portrait Gallery
  45. April 4, 2017- 42nd Street Premiere in aid of East Anglia’s Children’s Hospices
8

Harvard awards 10 honorary degrees

Dame Judi Dench, Doctor of Arts

Dame Judi Dench is a celebrated actress who has garnered wide popular and critical admiration for a career marked by outstanding performances in both classical and contemporary roles.

Over her 60-year career, she has been revered for her work in television, film, and on stage. Dench gained international recognition for her legendary role as M in seven James Bond films.

Dench has won numerous major awards, including an Academy Award, 10 BAFTA Awards, eight Laurence Olivier Awards, and a Tony Award for Best Actress. In recognition of her many achievements she received an OBE (Order of the British Empire) in 1970, became a Dame of the British Empire in 1988, and in 2005 was awarded a Companion of Honour.

A few caps from the Commencement Morning Exercises.  I managed to snag them while at work.  Better ones to follow later.

Black Classic Excellence

Originally posted by navybeanqueen

Jo Baker (Josephine Baker)  was an American-born French dancer, jazz and pop music singer, and actress, who came to be known in various circles as the “Black Pearl,” “Bronze Venus” “Jazz Cleopatra”, and even the “Creole Goddess”. BornFreda Josephine McDonald in St. Louis, Missouri, Josephine Baker became a citizen of France in 1937. She was fluent in both English and French.Baker was the first black woman to star in a major motion picture, Zouzou (1934), or to become a world-famous entertainer. 

Originally posted by nostalgiagolden

Dorothy Dandrige  was an American film and theatre actress, singer and dancer. She is perhaps best known for being the first African-American actress to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance in the 1954 film Carmen Jones

Originally posted by imthehuman

Mae Mckinney

Dubbed “The Black Garbo” in Europe because of her striking beauty,McKinney was one of the first African-American film stars in the United States, as well as one of the first African Americans to appear on British television.

Lena Horne  was an American jazz and pop music singer, dancer, actress, and civil rights activist.  Horne joined the chorus of the Cotton Club at the age of 16 and became a nightclub performer before moving to Hollywood, where she had small parts in numerous movies, and more substantial parts in the 1943 films Cabin in the Sky and Stormy Weather. Because of the Red Scare and her political activism, Horne found herself blacklisted and unable to get work in Hollywood. Her career spanned over 70 years appearing in film, television, and on Broadway

Originally posted by jacquesdemys


Originally posted by nitratediva

Francine Everett  was an African-American actress and singer who is best known for her performances in race films, independently produced motion pictures with all-black casts that were created exclusively for distribution to cinemas that catered to African American audiences.