british 19th century

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John Martin (1789–1854, England)

Dramatic landscapes 2

John Martin was an English Romantic painter and one of the most popular artists of his day. He was celebrated for his typically vast and melodramatic paintings of religious subjects and fantastic compositions, populated with minute figures placed in imposing landscapes. His dramatic and subjective style of composition was in stark contrast to the emerging schools of naturalism and realism, which led his work to fall out of critical favour soon after his death, however a revival in interest has occured towards the end of the 20th century, and now his major works are popular pieces of many museum’s collections.

Frederic Leighton, Flaming June, 1895, oil on canvas, 120 × 120 cm, Museo de Arte de Ponce. Source

Flaming June perfectly presents the classicist style of Lord Leighton. The female subject, draped in a sheer orange garment, sleeps as peacefully as a nymph, perhaps unaware that she is being watched.

“The Roses of Heliogabalus” (detail) (1888) by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836-1912).

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Centrefire Semi-Automatic Pistol with Stock from Germany dated about 1899 on display at the Royal Armouries in Leeds

The Mauser C96 “Broomhandle” had become very fashionable and the Mauser was most advanced and expensive. Such weapons were used by the Boers in South Africa, this one being seized by the Royal Scots Fusiliers.  The wooden holster-stock has been carved with ’R.S. Fusiliers, Boer War, 1899-1900-01-02’ set around a South African Republic coin.

The coin is the Krugerrand named after the man on it, Paul Kruger the third President of the South African Republic and famous for his opposition to the British Empire during the Second Boer War. He was a controversial figure not just for fighting the Empire but also for his treatment of Black Africans in the Republic

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David Roberts (1796–1864, Scotland)

Picturesque Sketches in Spain Taken During ye Years 1832 & 1833

David Roberts was a Scottish landscape painter, known for a prolific series of detailed lithograph prints of Egypt and the Near East that he produced from sketches he made during long tours of the region (1838–1840). These and his large oil paintings of similar subjects made him a prominent Orientalist painter. He was elected as a Royal Academician in 1841.

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Thomas Francis Dicksee (1819–1895, Engand)

Characters from Shakespeare

Thomas Francis Dicksee was an English painter, primarily a portraitist and painter of historical, genre subjects — often from Shakespeare. He exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1841 until the year of his death. His brother John Robert Dicksee was also a painter, and his children, Frank and Margaret likewise became painters. In The Dictionary of Victorian Painters, Herbert Dicksee is given as his son also, but according to the City of London School, where Herbert taught, he was the son of John Robert Dicksee.

Queen Victoria’s Beautiful Birthday Fan

This amazing fan was gifted to Queen Victoria on her 39th birthday (24th May 1858) by Prince Albert. The fan was almost certainly made in France by  Madame Rebours, who had been granted a royal warrant by Victoria. It features Victoria’s monogram VR below by a crown, and swags of lilies-of-the-valley (among other flowers) and ribbons. During the Victorian era, flower symbolism became immensely popular .Since this fan was commissioned for Victoria’s birthday her ‘birth flower’ (those lilies-of-the-valley) decorates the fan extensively. 

History Fact 7/100 - Admiral Nelson

Viscount Horatio Nelson, the First Duke of Bronté, was a flag officer in the British Navy. He was born in Norfolk, the son of a clergyman, and one of eleven children. He joined the Royal Navy at twelve, and ascended to the rank of Captain by the time he was twenty.

During the French Revolution, Nelson was in command of the Agamemnon, a 64 gun third rate ship of the line.
Nelson became known as a bold, rational man, with occasional disregard for his senior officers. During the Battle of Copenhagen, in order to avoid withdrawing his ship, he put his telescope to his blind eye and claimed he couldn’t see the signal.

Nelson’s strategic excellence was crucial at the Battle of the Nile, where the English fleet successfully destroyed the fleet of Napoleon. His most famous battle is Cape Trafalgar, where he led the English against a combined fleet of the Spanish and French, protecting England from invasion. Nelson was killed during this battle as he paced the quarterdeck, shot by a French sniper.

The body of Admiral Nelson was transported back to England, and he was given a state funeral.