british 19th century

Anonymous - The British Library Board - Flowers And Water (083439) Japanese Blockprints (Olga Hirsch collection of decorated papers, bequeathed to the British Library in 1968) Late 19th Century Chiyogami, with Chrysanthemums symbolizing Imperial Japan, and Red Carnations suggesting romantic love (© 2016 The British Library)

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Thomas Francis Dicksee (1819–1895, Engand)

Characters from Shakespeare

Thomas Francis Dicksee was an English painter, primarily a portraitist and painter of historical, genre subjects — often from Shakespeare. He exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1841 until the year of his death. His brother John Robert Dicksee was also a painter, and his children, Frank and Margaret likewise became painters. In The Dictionary of Victorian Painters, Herbert Dicksee is given as his son also, but according to the City of London School, where Herbert taught, he was the son of John Robert Dicksee.

Bird mask of the Tsimshian people, used in initiation ceremonies.  Artist unknown; 19th century.  Collected in Nisga’a territory at the mouth of the Nass River, British Columbia, Canada; now in the Louvre.

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John Martin (1789–1854, England)

Dramatic landscapes 2

John Martin was an English Romantic painter and one of the most popular artists of his day. He was celebrated for his typically vast and melodramatic paintings of religious subjects and fantastic compositions, populated with minute figures placed in imposing landscapes. His dramatic and subjective style of composition was in stark contrast to the emerging schools of naturalism and realism, which led his work to fall out of critical favour soon after his death, however a revival in interest has occured towards the end of the 20th century, and now his major works are popular pieces of many museum’s collections.

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David Roberts (1796–1864, Scotland)

Gothic paintings

David Roberts was a Scottish landscape painter, known for a prolific series of detailed lithograph prints of Egypt and the Near East that he produced from sketches he made during long tours of the region (1838–1840). These and his large oil paintings of similar subjects made him a prominent Orientalist painter. He was elected as a Royal Academician in 1841.