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ON NATIONAL PUBLIC LANDS DAY TODAY, WE ALSO CELEBRATE NATIONAL HUNTING AND FISHING DAY!

Did you know? More than 3,000 species of wildlife occur on BLM’s more than 245 million acres in 23 States, dispersed over some of the Nation’s most ecologically diverse and essential habitat. BLM-managed lands are vital to many threatened, endangered and “at risk” species, including the California condor.  A cooperative conservation and recovery effort between private, state, federal and tribal partners, and the American public has helped California condors recover from the brink of extinction.  Seventy-five of the world’s 439 condors live throughout northern Arizona within the BLM-managed Vermilion Cliffs National Monument.

Hunters have a long tradition of wildlife conservation, and are an important partner in the future recovery of California condors. How can hunters help condors? Lead poisoning is the primary cause of condor deaths in the wild. Lead bullets fragment and remain in the carcass of the animal, where they are ingested by the birds and a single carcass can expose an entire group of birds to lead poisoning.  Hunters can help reduce the amount of lead available to condors by switching to non-lead ammunition.

Hunters have proven to us that with education they are willing to voluntarily do the right thing for condor recovery by using non-lead ammo. –Alan Zufelt, Condor Program Coordinator, Arizona Game and Fish Department

Learn more about the science of condor recovery and our National Public Lands Day condor events: http://mypubliclands.tumblr.com/search/condors