bringing up old news

Full transcript of Adam Lanza's 2011 radio appearance
  • BEGIN TRANSCRIPT:
  • (music fades out)
  • Host: Hello! We got the collapsible headphones here, but uh... we're back.
  • Co-Host: (inaudible) we got Greg on the phone.
  • Host: Oh! Greg. Okay. How's it going?
  • Lanza: Hi, good. Um, I'm a fan of your writing.
  • Host: Thank you.
  • Lanza: I'm sorry to bring up such an old news story, but I couldn't find anything that you said about the topic, and it seems relevant to your interests, so I thought I would bring up Travis the Chimp. Do you remember him?
  • Host: I don't.
  • Lanza: Well, um, he was a highly domesticated chimpanzee, who lived in a suburban home in Stamford, Connecticut.
  • Co-Host: Oh, yeah.
  • Host: Oh.
  • Lanza: And he was raised just like a human child, starting from the week he was born. By the time that he was fourteen years old, which would be somewhere around age twenty in human years, um...
  • Host: Uh-huh.
  • Lanza: ...he slept in a bed, he took his own baths, he dressed himself, he brushed his teeth with an electric toothbrush...
  • Host: (laughs) Really? When was this?
  • Lanza: Um... well.. (chuckles) this happened in early two-thousand-and-nine.
  • Co-host and Host: Oh!
  • Lanza: He ate his meals at a table, and he enjoyed human foods like ice cream, and used a remote control to watch television, and liked baseball games... and he even used a computer to look at pictures on the internet.
  • Host: Huh.
  • Lanza: And... (chuckles) it goes without saying that Travis was very overweight; he was two hundred pounds when he should have been around the low hundreds. And he was actually taking Xanax.
  • Co-Host: (laughing)
  • Host: Amazing.
  • Lanza: I couldn't find any information about why he was taking it, but it just seems to say a lot that he was given it at all. And, basically, I think Travis wasn't any different than a mentally handicapped human child.
  • Host: Hmm.
  • Lanza: But, anyway, one day in February 2009, he was acting very agitated, and at some point grabbed the car - his owner's - car keys, and went outside and started leaping from car to car, apparently wanting to go for a car ride. And he was acting very aggressively, so, his owner called her over to get her to help calm him down and get him to go back inside, and once she arrived, he immediately attacked her, and his owner tried to stop him, but couldn't, and she even resorted to stabbing him with a knife, but nothing worked.
  • And she said that after she stabbed him, he looked at her as if to say "Why'd you do that to me, Mom?" Because apparently that was what their relationship was like; no different than between a human mother and child.
  • So, after stabbing, she called the police, who arrived twelve minutes after the attack, at which point her friend was... pretty close to dead. And once the cruiser came up, Travis went over to it, tried to open the locked passenger door. He smashed off the side mirror, went over to the driver's door, opened it, and the cop shot him. He fled back into the house, where he went to his playroom and bled to death.
  • Host: Hmm.
  • Lanza: And... (chuckles) um, it might not seem very relevant, but I'm bringing it up because afterward, everyone was condemning his owner for, saying how irresponsible she was for raising a chimp like it was a child, and that she should have that something like this would happen, because chimps aren't supposed to be living in civilization, they're supposed to be living in the wild, among each other. But, their criticism stops there-
  • Host: Mmm-hmm.
  • Lanza: -and the implication is that there's no way that anything could have gone wrong in this life if he were living in this civilization as a human, rather than a chimp.
  • Host: Ah, indeed.
  • Lanza: Because, uh, he brings up questions about this whole process of child-raising.
  • Host: Yeah.
  • Lanza: Civilization isn't something which just happens to gently exist without us having to do anything, because every newborn child - human child - is born in a chimp-like state, and civilization is only sustained by conditioning them for years on end, so that they'll accept it for what it is, and since we've gone through this conditioning, we can observe a human family raising a human child - and I'm sure that even you have trouble intuitively seeing it as something unnatural - but when we see a chimp in that position, we immediately know that there's something profoundly wrong with the situation. And it's easy to say there's something wrong with it simply because it's a chimp, but what's the real difference between us and our closest relatives?
  • Travis wasn't an untamed monster at all. Um, he wasn't just feigning domestication, he was civilized. Um, he was able to integrate into society, he was a chimp actor when he was younger, and his owner drove him around the city frequently in association with her towing business, where he met many different people, and got alone with everyone. If Travis had been some nasty monster all his life, it would have been widely reported. But, to the contrary, it seems like everyone who knew him said how shocked they were that Travis had been so savage, because they knew him as a sweet child, and... there were two isolated incidents early in his life where he acted aggressively, but... summarizing them would take too long, so basically I'll just say that he didn't really any differently than a human child would, and the people who would use that as an indictment against having chimps live as humans do wouldn't apply the same thing to humans, so it's just kind of irrelevant.
  • Host: Uh-huh.
  • Lanza: Bu anyway, look what civilization did to him; it had the same exact effect on him as it has on humans. He was profoundly sick in every sense of the term, and he had to resort to these surrogate activities like watching baseball, and looking at pictures on a computer screen, and taking Xanax. He was a complete mess.
  • Host: Mmm-hmm.
  • Lanza: And his attack wasn't simply because he was a senselessly violent, impulsive chimp. Uhm, which was how his behavior was universally portrayed. Um, immediately before the attack, he had desperately been wanting his owner to drive him somewhere, and the best reason I can think of for why he would want that, looking at his entire life, would be that... some little things he experienced was the last straw, and he was overwhelmed at the life that he had, and he wanted to get out of it by changing his environment, and the best way that he knew how to deal with that was getting his owner to drive him somewhere else.
  • Host: Yeah.
  • Lanza: And when his owner's... owner's friend, arrived, he knew that she was trying to coax him back into his place of domestication, and he couldn't handle that, so he attacked her, and anyone else who approached them. And dismissing his attack as simply being the senseless violence and impulsiveness of a chimp, instead of a human, is wishful thinking at best.
  • Host: Mmm-hmm.
  • Lanza: His attack can be seen entirely parallel to the attacks and random acts of violence that you bring up on your show every week, committed by humans, which the mainstream also has no explanation for-and-
  • Host: No.
  • Lanza: -and, actual humans... I just- just don't think it would be such a stretch to say that he very well could have been a teenage mall shooter or something like that.
  • Host: Yeah. Yeah.
  • Lanza: And-
  • Host: Wow. Thank you, Greg.
  • Lanza: Yeah.
  • Host: That's quite a story. That's, uh, really apropos, isn't it? Travis the chimp.
  • Lanza: It's just that I'm a little surprised that I haven't heard you bring it up all because... (laughs) maybe I'm just seeing connections where there aren't any, but-
  • Host: Not at, I uh, think not. No, I just... I didn't catch that one. I didn't uh... maybe I was out of the country or something, I don't know, but I missed that it. Thanks very much, man.
  • Lanza: Thank you. Bye.
  • Host: Take care.
  • (Lanza hangs up)

anonymous asked:

The "protesting" of Milo at Berkeley devolved to rioting even if there were peaceful protests. Stop spreading misinformation, at this moment I'm tempted to side with the professional troll who's a loose cannon rather than the ignorant blogger who obviously can't be bothered to do a half-decent Google search. Congrats, Ms. Resistance, you and your buddies not only made Milo the good guy/injured party, if only briefly, you further angered Cheeto Man and made yourselves look bad. Congratulations!

this is the timestamp on this ask, this is not some ask i got belatedly:  April 5th 2017, 8:40:00 pm

So you’re probly the same shitty anon who sent the same ask about Milo Yikesdotcom on my thg blog, but sure, you side with the Nazi, and I’ll side with Berkeley students, I think I’m good and know which side of history i’m on.

Transcript of Adam Lanza’s Call to AnarchyRadio

On 20 December 2011, Adam Lanza called in to a talk radio program, AnarchyRadio, broadcasted on KWVA 88.1 FM out of the University of Oregon. The show is hosted by John Zerzan, a writer described by The Atlantic as “an intellectual leader of the anarcho-primitivist movement, an ideology that regards technology as a destroyer of human communities.” The reason for Lanza’s interest in Zerzan’s writings is plainly evident in the call itself; Lanza calls to share a story about “Travis the Chimp,” a domesticated chimpanzee that in 2009 “snapped,” and viciously attacked 55-year-old Charla Nash, a friend of the chimp’s owner. The attack was seemingly random, nearly cost the victim her life, and ended when the chimp was shot by police. Lanza outlines
how the chimp’s violent episode can be explained by his upbringing “as if he were a [human]
child,” and argues that Travis’s “civilized” upbringing was what led to his attack.

JOHN ZERZAN: Here we go … hello. We got the collapsible headphones here but, uh,we’re back.
SHOW RUNNER: [Unintelligible] … we’ve got Greg on the phone.
ZERZAN: Oh, Greg, okay, how’s it going?
ADAM LANZA: Hi, good. Um. I’m a fan of your writing. Um.
ZERZAN: Thank you.
LANZA: I’m sorry to [bring up?] such an old news story but I couldn’t find anything that you said about the topic, and it seems relevant to your interests, so I thought I would bring up Travis the Chimp, do you remember him?
ZERZAN: I don’t!
LANZA: Well, he was the highly domesticated chimpanzee who lived in a suburban home in Stamford, Connecticut.
SHOW RUNNER: Oh, yeah.
ZERZAN: Oh.
LANZA: And he was raised just like a human child, starting from the week he was born. By the time that he was fourteen years old, which would be somewhere around age twenty in human years —
ZERZAN: Uh-huh.
LANZA: — um, he slept in a bed, he took his own baths, he dressed himself, he brushed his teeth with an electric toothbrush.
ZERZAN: [laughs] Really? When was this?
LANZA: Um. Well, this happened in early 2009.
ZERZAN: Oh

SHOW RUNNER: Oh.

LANZA: Um.

ZERZAN: Uh-huh?
LANZA: He ate his meals at a table and enjoyed human foods like ice cream and he used a remote control to watch television and liked baseball games. And he even used a computer to look at pictures on the internet.
ZERZAN: Huh!
LANZA: And, [chuckles] it goes without saying that Travis was very overweight. He was two hundred pounds when he should have been around the low hundreds.
ZERZAN: Mmhm.
LANZA: And he was actually taking Xanax.
SHOW RUNNER: [laughs]
ZERZAN: Amazing.
LANZA: I couldn’t find any information about why he was taking it, but it just seems to say a lot that he was given it at all. And, basically, I think Travis wasn’t really any different than a mentally handicapped human child.
ZERZAN: Hmm.
LANZA: But anyway, one day in February 2009, he was acting very agitated, and at some point grabbed the car — his owner’s car keys, went outside and started beeping from car to car, apparently wanting to go for a car ride, and he was acting very aggressively, so his owner called her friend over to get her to help him to calm down and go back inside, and once she arrived he immediately attacked her and his owner tried to stop him but couldn’t and she
even resorted to stabbing him with a knife, but nothing worked. And she said that after she stabbed him he looked at her as if to say, “Why’d you do that to me, Mom?” Because apparently that was what the relationship was like, no different than between a human mother and a human child.
ZERZAN: Hmm.
LANZA: So after the stabbing, she called the police, who arrived twelve minutes after the attack, at which point her friend was pretty close to dead. And once the cruiser came up,Travis went over to it, tried to open the locked passenger door. He smashed off the side-view mirror, went over to the driver’s door, opened it, and the cop shot him. He fled back into the house, where he went to his playroom and bled to death.
ZERZAN: Hmm .. .
LANZA: And um, [chuckles] this might not seem very relevant, but I’m bringing it up because afterward, everyone was condemning his owner for saying how irresponsible she was for raising a chimp like it was a child. And that she should have known something like this would happen, because chimps aren’t supposed to be living in civilization, they’re supposed to be living in the wild,among each other.
ZERZAN: Mhmm.
LANZA: But, their criticism stops there and the implication is that there’s no way anything could have gone wrong in his life if he had been living in this civilization as a human rather than a chimp

ZERZAN: Ah, indeed.

LANZA: [And?] I’m so interested in Travis, um, because he brings up questions about this whole process of child-raising. Um.
ZERZAN: Yeah.
LANZA: Civilization isn’t something which just happens to gently exist without us having to do anything, because every newborn child — human child — is born in a chimp-like state,and civilization is only sustained by conditioning them for years on end so that they’ll accept it for what it is. And since we’ve gone through this conditioning, we can observe a human family raising a human child, and I’m sure that even you have trouble intuitively seeing it
as something unnatural, but when we see a chimp in that position, we [visually?] know that there’s something profoundly wrong with the situation. And it’s easy to say there’s something wrong with it simply because it’s a chimp, but what’s the real difference between us and our closest relatives? Travis wasn’t an untamed monster at all. Um, he wasn’t just feigning domestication,
he was civilized. Um, he was able to integrate into society, he was a chimp actor when he was younger, and his owner drove him around the city frequently in association with
her towing business, where he met many different people, and got along with everyone. If Travis had been some nasty monster all his life, it would have been widely reported, but to the contrary, it seems like everyone who knew him said how shocked they were that Travis had been so savage, because they knew him as a sweet child. And — there were two isolated incidents early in his life when he acted aggressively, but summarizing them would take too long, so basically I’ll just say that he didn’t act really any differently than a human child
would, and the people who would use that as an indictment against having chimps live as humans do wouldn’t apply the same thing to humans, so it’s just kind of irrelevant.
ZERZAN: Mhmm.
LANZA: But anyway, look what civilization did to him: it had the same exact effect on him as it has on humans. He was profoundly sick, in every sense of the term, and he had to resort to these surrogate activities like watching baseball, and looking at pictures on a computer screen, and taking Xanax. He was a complete mess.
ZERZAN: Mhm.
LANZA: And his attack wasn’t simply because he was a senselessly violent, impulsive chimp.Um, which was how his behavior was universally portrayed. Um, immediately before his attack, he had desperately been wanting his owner to drive him somewhere, and the best reason I can think of for why he would want that, looking at his entire life, would be that some little thing he experienced was the last straw, and he was overwhelmed by the life that
he had, and he wanted to get out of it by changing his environment, and the best way that he knew how to deal with that was by getting his owner to drive him somewhere else.
ZERZAN: Yeah.
LANZA: And when his owner’s — owner’s friend arrived, he knew that she was trying to coax him back into his life of domestication, and he couldn’t handle that, so — he attacked her, and anyone else who approached them. And dismissing his attack as simply being the senseless
violence and impulsiveness of a chimp, instead of a human, is wishful thinking at best.
ZERZAN: Mmm-hmm.
LANZA: His attack can be seen entirely parallel to the attacks and random acts of violence
that you bring up on your show every week —
ZERZAN: Mmm …

LANZA: — committed by humans, which the mainstream also has no explanation for, and —

ZERZAN: No.

LANZA: — and actual humans — I just don’t think it would be such a stretch to say that he very well could have been a teenage mall shooter or something like that.

ZERZAN: Yeah, yeah.

LANZA: And —
ZERZAN: Wow. Thank you, Greg.
LANZA: Yeah, I —
ZERZAN: That’s quite a story. Yeah, that’s, uh, really apropos, isn’t it.
LANZA: Yeah.
ZERZAN: Travis the Chimp.
LANZA: It’s just that I’m a little surprised that I never heard you bring it up at all because [chuckles] maybe I’m just seeing connections where there aren’t any, but —
ZERZAN: Not — I think not, no, I just, I didn’t catch that one, I didn’t, uh — maybe I was out of the country or something, I don’t know but I missed it. Thanks very much, man.
LANZA: Thank you. Bye.
ZERZAN: Take care. Wow. Very well articulated, I think. Okay, well, uh, uh, I guess we
better move on .. .

Garnet and Steven’s relationship is a metaphor for coming out of the closet.

In the first season, Garnet is doing her best to take the place of leader among the Crystal Gems, and, like Rose before her, has begun to live a life of secrets. She keeps up a constant facade of composure and wisdom, and refuses to let herself appear anything less than capable. Pearl and Amethyst needed someone to steady them in their grief, and when Garnet became that person, by shoving her own emotions and needs to the side, they began to see her as flawless. True, they were letting their pain rule their common sense – G can’t be perfect, she’s got her own problems, and of course they know that, deep down – but at least, having fought through the war and grown up with her, Pearl and Amethyst know Garnet’s history.

Though we aren’t yet clear on the whole story, we have to assume Rose was Garnet’s ticket to free expression on Earth. Garnet could be who and what she was without fear because Rose – and the other gems – would protect her. Earth is not Homeworld; Rose is not like the other Diamonds. But Rose dies, Pearl and Amethyst are overwhelmed, and suddenly Garnet is very exposed. She dons both a mask of leadership and of fearlessness, because she cannot rely on the other Gems to cater to her when they are so obviously hurting.

Enter Steven, and a new stressor sits atop Garnet’s pile of concerns. Not only does she have to help the newest Crystal Gem discover his abilites and guard his life, but also teach him about their culture. Steven has never reacted with anything but enthusiasm, but there is always the chance that he’ll hear a snippet of their lore and react badly. What if the concept of fusion disgusts him? What if he agrees with Homeworld, and thinks it should be avoided? What if he simply doesn’t understand the want for fusion outside of battle? The concept is awfully intimate for humans, after all.

He adores Opal, and fuses with Connie. He reacts (mostly) well to both. But anxiety still nags at Garnet about explaining herself – what if she reveals Ruby and Sapphire, and Steven sees her differently? What if he feels like she’s been lying to him his whole life? What if he no longer views her as a person, but as an action? What if he no longer trusts her, or demands she unfuse?

Garnet tightens her mask, and hesitantly plans to show him. When he’s older, she thinks. On his birthday. Later, later. Then we’ll show him who we are. Who I am. A little longer, and he might understand.

The invasion by the Homeworld gems blatently exposes Ruby and Sapphire, and when Garnet becomes herself once again, her first words are, “I’m sorry.” Her visor is gone, and her eyes wide. She stutters. I’m sorry that I am what I am, I’m sorry I didn’t tell you, I’m sorry if you can’t trust me, I’m sorry, I’m sorry, I was afraid you wouldn’t love me.

But from that moment on, Steven is starry-eyed and enamoured. Not only does he accept that Garnet is a fusion, but he’s absolutely thrilled about the idea. He asks her about it at every opportunity. What is it like? What are they like? Can I meet them? Do they each rule over different parts of you? He asks, and he digs for answers – even when she says, “You’ve fused, you know what it’s like,” he insists that no, he doesn’t, because Garnet is different, Garnet is unique, and he wants to know every detail of what it’s like for her. When Connie asks how Garnet is already in a relationship, Steven proudly tells her that Garnet is a fusion, and she’s perfect as she is. He validates her.

Pearl and Amethyst are used to the idea of Garnet being a fusion, and they never bother to bring it up. It’s old news, to them. But Garnet has been, since the moment Steven came into her life, worrying. What if he doesn’t trust me? What if he doesn’t understand me? What if he hates me? She took every anxiety about her identity and hid it under the same mask that she was using to lead. Garnet is fearless. Garnet has no flaws. Garnet is strong and has future vision to tell her that everything’s going to be okay. She comes off as immensely stoic in the first season, because she’s trying so desperately to keep up that image, for the sake of the Gems and Steven. But during Jailbreak, Steven gains insight to Garnet – she has fears; she was scared when Ruby and Sapphire were apart. She has flaws; fusion is seen as dirty. She has moments of weakness and future vision isn’t reliable. Steven understands that Garnet isn’t infallable, something Pearl and Amethyst haven’t been able to do.

In season two, Garnet is quite obviously a very different gem. She’s so, so smiley, and confesses when she’s worried, and offers Steven information she would have hesitated about before. She trusts him to watch her back and absolutely gushes when he asks about Ruby and Sapphire. She’s happy. Not perfect, not healed, not flawless. But her secret is out, and she feels safe. Steven, like Rose before him, is willing to learn about and support her.

All this draws a striking parallel to the lives of many people in the LGBTQ+ spectrum. Whether for lesbians, asexuals, trans folk, aromantics, or whatever else, it’s easy to see Garnet’s life as a representation of the experience and fear of coming out. For the majority of her life, Garnet has pretended to be something she’s not. She doesn’t willingly introduce herself as a fusion. Steven didn’t know what Garnet was before he met, and created his own opinions of her as he grew up – Garnet was terrified that if she revealed her true self, he wouldn’t be able to let go of those opinions, and would use them against her.

(“I just never pictured you marrying a woman.”; “You’re just confused.”; “Society says it’s wrong, and I agree.”; “Wouldn’t you rather be normal?”; “You’re going through a phase, and you’ll look back on this and be so ashamed.”; “What if you change your mind?”; “It’s not right.”)

Instead, when Steven get excited and quizzes Garnet on her life, he identifies himself as someone who isn’t going to judge or try to change her. Not only does he acknowledge her decision, as Pearl and Amethyst have, but asks her to detail it to him. She has an outlet, finally, for expressing herself. When in the presence of others, Garnet - and we who are not cis/het - keeps up a persona: I am the leader, I am what you think I am, I have no fears and no flaws. You can trust me, I am not different. But how often, on this website, and in queer-safe spaces offline, have folks laughed, “I’m so gay,” or “Yes, look at me, blending with the heterosexuals.”? When LGBTQ+ people feel like they’re around others who understand, they can go on about their differences endlessly, with vigor and humor. No one wants to hear transphobic or gay-bashing jokes, but when you’re queer and you’re with people that are also queer or at least accepting of it, you tease. You gush. You get excited, because I am, and you are, and there is nothing wrong with us. 

Steven is Garnet’s safe space.

not to bring up old news or anything but when the chick in lord of the rings said “I am no man” before letting out a battle cry and stabbing that Edgelord in his shadowy void of a face I Felt So Alive,,,, that was truly Iconic and I have a huge smile on my face just thinking about it

GIVE ME MY SIN AGAIN
Chapter 2: Disconnected

Ship: Rin Matsuoka x Gou Matsuoka (Free!)
Genre: drama, romance
Length: undecided atm
Warning: incest, possible NC-17 in later chapters

Summary: Gou attempts to reconnect with Rin like old times while Rin brings up some news during dinner that makes Gou question her feelings towards her brother.

Keep reading

#suhoprotectionsquad

Okay, stop. Do not bring up something irrelevant just because you mistook it. DON’T BRING UP SHIT THAT’S BEEN OLD NEWS

SUHO
DID
NOTHING
WRONG

WHY ARE YOU STARTING SOMETHING OUT OF NOTHING
It’s dumb. Stop.

Also, anyone saying stupid shit against suho for something that’s irrelevant can fight me. Would you want someone telling to “drink bleach and die”? No. I don’t think so you pathetic person

anonymous asked:

"pizza is racist" "nooo stop talking about it I don't want to get involved ugh old news don't want to bring it up" you do this shit all the time, just outright say something then completely pass it off and ignore it when someone asks you to explain yourself

1am thoughts: I think Taylor’s relationship w Harry was cut too short and her album basically explains it. it was a constant battle between one direction fans and the oh so terrible threat of breaking Harry’s heart and writing a rude love song about him. they were constantly on pins and needles especially Taylor because so many of Harry’s fans were so against her and that is so unfair, how would you feel if millions of people were so against you trying to find love or actually have a relationship work out? the uproar was so unnecessary, they could’ve become the pop power couple do you see how hypocritical fans were being?? like what kind of bs is that. maybe I’m bringing up old news but I felt like something had to be said because I think Taylor and Harry didn’t deserve that and they really could’ve been something if the world weren’t so bitter about Taylor Swift and writing love songs.