bringbackourgirls

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There was a lot of talk today about the media’s failed coverage [read: non-coverage] of the 234 Nigerian girls, thus came the #234WhiteGirls hashtag.

No, none of us wants any white girls to go missing. We just want these Nigerian girls to get the same amount of coverage that white girls get (or would get), because EVERY girl matters.

#BRINGBACKOURGIRLS

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So, this is pretty shocking. 234 girls were abducted from their boarding school in Chibok in Nigeria on April 15th. Most of them are between the ages of 16 and 18. It is known that they were abducted by the terrorist group Boko Haram, and it is believed that the girls are being sold as wives, and are now involved in human traficking. It is even known roughly where they are being kept.
There has been very little response from the Nigerian government, in fact even telling international media that a large number had been found when they hadn’t. The Nigerian army is also very inefficient at dealing with this kind of crisis. The Nigerian people have been holding mass protests and fundraising to send out private search parties into the jungle. Now there is a call for international governments to lend a hand, these girls have done nothing to deserve to suffer at the hands of a corrupt and unjust government.

As usual with third world affairs, I’ve seen very little about this on tumblr, and there’s been an international social media campaign to raise awareness about this. Can you imagine in 234 girls went missing from the UK, USA or Europe?! If you call yourself a feminist, then you have a duty to care about women’s rights internationally, and this a pretty big infringement of those rights.

Please spread the message about this, and go and find out about it! You can sign this petition to the Nigerian President or this one to the White House.. Or you could donate to a human rights organisation such as Amnesty International, who have even set up a tumblr to show support for the girls.

I’m just shocked at the lack of media coverage this is getting, and more people need to be aware of this!

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In Mid-April nearly 300 girls between the ages of 16 to 18 who were pursuing their right to education were kidnapped from a government school in Northern Nigeria, for the sole purpose to be sold and married off. The terrorist group who did this are called Boko Haram (which means “Western Education is sin”), whose purpose is too deny the right of education for women and to deny people of “non-islamic” traditions. Let us join together to fight this act of terrorism and bring awareness to the world that we must set an example, that people have a right to education. BRING BACK OUR GIRLS FOR THEY ARE NOT FOR SALE. 

***Image credit to the Women Empowerment team of the International School Moshi Arusha Campus, situated in Tanzania.

***Please help spread these photos by sharing, reblogging, liking, whatever can spread this***

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People are mobilizing under the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls to pressure the government to do more to find 234 teenage girls kidnapped by jihadist group Boko Haram.

#BringBackOurGirls: Nigerians Demand Release of 200 Abducted Girls

A few weeks ago, armed men abducted the girls, who are between 15 and 18 years old, from the Government Girls Secondary School in Chibok, about 130 kilometres west of Maiduguri in northeast Nigeria. Some have reportedly been forced into marriage with their abductors.

The angst over the horrid abduction and the seeming lack of firm commitment to secure their release has resulted in citizen action. Twitter users are mobilizing and tweeting in support of the protests across the nation, using the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls.

Amnesty International

Petition in solidarity via change.org

In Nigeria, over 200 girls were recently abducted from their boarding school by a terrorist group, Boko Haram, that may be selling them as brides for $12 each. I am calling on the Nigerian government to save them.

This is part of an ongoing conflict within Nigeria that has nothing to do with these 200 girls. The abducted young girls are being affected by a conflict they did not create, and their voices need to be heard. I can only imagine what these 200 girls have been through, and their government is not doing nearly enough to save them.

The group Boko Haram has repeatedly said girls should not be educated. I am a young Nigerian woman pursuing my education in Germany. I believe the Nigerian government must do more to ensure the safe return of these girls.

By signing this petition we declare our solidarity with the kidnapped girls and call upon the world not to forget them, support all efforts to ensure their safe return, and ask President Goodluck Jonathan and the Nigerian Government to ensure all schools are safe places to learn, protected from attack.

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[For more on social justice, follow me on Instagram: soulrevision , Tumblr: soulrevision , Facebook: soulrevision , Twitter: soulrevision]

Part 2: 

There was a lot of talk today about the media’s failed coverage [read: non-coverage] of the 234 Nigerian girls, thus came the #234WhiteGirls hashtag.

No, none of us wants any white girls to go missing. We just want these Nigerian girls to get the same amount of coverage that white girls get (or would get), because EVERY girl matters.

#BRINGBACKOURGIRLS

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Philadelphians Stand in Solidarity with the Chibok234

Above are images from a rally I attended today held at Love Park in Philadelphia, PA. The objective of the demonstration was to show support and solidarity toward the hundreds of Nigerian schoolgirls abducted by terrorist group, Boko Haram, over two weeks ago. 

Local activists, poets, and professors addressed the crowd to express their frustrations with the lack of international media attention the story has received, the perpetuation of rape culture that enables these acts of violence, and the world’s refusal to acknowledge black people’s humanity.

The crowd broke into chants of “Black Girls Matter,” “We are Africans,” and “Bring Back Our Girls” while walking through downtown Philadelphia in an effort to raise awareness of this situation as well as stress the importance of protecting the well-being of black girls across the globe. 

More information on abduction#ToMySisters234 | #BringBackOurGirls

TW for violence

Boko Haram’s “Deadliest Massacre” Kills Thousands in Nigeria

“In the most recent attacks by extremist militant group Boko Haram, hundreds of gunmen attacked the town of Baga, leaving up to 2,000 people dead. The majority of those killed were women, children, and the elderly who could not flee quickly enough.

Boko Haram has continually attacked northern Nigeria since 2009; they have targeted officials, civilians, women, children, and have kidnapped girls. In the most internationally known case, the militants kidnapped more than 200 schoolgirls in April of last year – most of the girls are still missing, and attempts by the government to retrieve them have failed.

The news inspired the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls and protests insisting the Nigerian government and international governments do something to bring the schoolgirls home. Since then, at least 100 more girls have been kidnapped.

Boko Haram’s goal is to establish an Islamist state with strict Sharia law in Nigeria. Their attacks often disproportionately hurt and kill women and girls, though boys and men are also killed or are taken and forced to fight for the group.”

Read the full piece here

#BringBackOurGirls #JeSuisBaga

Married at age 13, Maimuna Abdullahi endured an abusive marriage for a year – and is now at 14 one of thousands of divorced girls in Nigeria. Once married, her husband forced her to drop out of school, blaming her few years of schooling for her disobedience. “She had too much ABCD,” he says. “Too much ABCD.”

Maimuna’s situation is representative of many others – only 2 percent of married girls in Nigeria attend school compared to 69 percent of unmarried girls, according to the United Nations. But Maimuna considers her self lucky, because she now attends the Tattalli School Free School for divorced girls and is learning a trade so she can support herself. 

Learn more via the AP.