bring back our girls

Dates To Remember

January 12th, 2010 - Earthquake in Haiti

May 16, 2010 - Aiyana Stanley-Jones

September 17, 2011 - Occupy Wall Street

February 26, 2012 - Trayvon Martin

April 14, 2014 - Nigerian school girls go missing

July 17, 2014 - Eric Garner

August 5th, 2014 - John Crawford III

August 9, 2014 - Mike Brown

August 9, 2014 (Still happening) - Ferguson Protests

January 3, 2015 - Nigeria Massacre

If I’ve forgotten anything, and I’m sure I have, please add on.

3

Boko Haram releases video showing kidnapped Nigerian girls

Terrorist group Boko Haram released a video Sunday, allegedly showing both alive and dead women who were kidnapped in Chibok, Nigeria, in April 2014. More than 270 girls were abducted at the time, sparking the #BringBackOurGirls campaign. In the new video, Boko Haram proposes an exchange for the kidnapped women.

They will tell you the woes of a Black man who got beat by police in the street. Beat by the man at work. Beat by the system at the institution. But never of the Black woman he took his frustration out on. Never of the Black girl he stretched into a casket. They will tell you of the brown boys who get pushed from school through pipeline to prison. But never of the girls who fill the cells. Never of the orange jumpsuits they camouflage into. 200 Black girls go missing in Nigeria, and America puts out a hashtag instead of a search party…

I guess queer, Black woman ain’t Black enough. I guess the movement ain’t meant to be a crossroad. I guess we are here for play, for make believe, pretend. POOF! How magic-trick-missing must I become?

Remember #BringBackOurGirls? This Is What Has Happened In The 5 Months Since

On the night of April 14, 2014, hundreds of schoolgirls at the Chibok boarding school in northeastern Nigeria awoke to the sound of gunfire. They saw men in camouflage approaching and thought soldiers were coming to save them from a militant attack, according to survivors’ accounts.

Remember 2014.

Remember where you were when you heard that a police officer could legally kill an unarmed teenager without consequence.

Remember Michael Brown and Trayvon Martin and Tamir Rice and the countless black children slaughtered by a corrupt country’s police force.

Remember the 43 young people in Mexico who were needlessly killed to stop them protesting, and remember the size of the protests that followed.

Remember the injustice at the Brazilian World Cup and how the sport was seen as more important than the people.

Remember the Nigerian schoolgirls who still are not home.

Remember the images of Hong Kong students being tear gassed for challenging the legitimacy of their democracy.

Remember when President Putin invaded the Ukraine.

Remember Gaza’s hospitals being bombed by Israeli forces and the small Palestinian children who died innocently playing in the street after their homes had been destroyed.

Remember when the meaning of the name Isis changed.

Remember watching the world raising their arms above their heads and asking their ‘protectors’ not to shoot.

These are the things that are important. These are a part of the story of humanity. We are all a part of this narrative. Some of us have bigger roles, but this world belongs to all of us. One day your children or grandchildren will be asking you questions about this time.

Remember how old you are this year.

Remember what point you are at in your life.

Remember how seeing the world around you change made you feel. and how you reacted.

Remember the conversations you had with friends and loved ones. and how they reacted.

Remember how you cried. Or how you did not.

Remember how shocked you were. Or how you were not.

Remember the loss. The individuals. The movements. The injustice. The change. How nothing was ever the same again.

Remember.

Ziggy Marley showing his support against the abduction of more than 200 schoolgirls in Nigeria. Access to education is a BASIC RIGHT, leave our innocent girls so they can strive!! #OneLove #BringBackOurGirls #BringBackOurDaughters 

One of the 219 Chibok schoolgirls abducted two years ago by Boko Haram militants returned home last month. Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari welcomed her in a televised meeting, promising to support her as she remakes her life and help her return to school and receive needed social support services. Reintegration is the goal for 19-year-old Amina Ali Nkeki and the 4-month-old baby she had while in captivity.

But how will that be achieved?

The experiences of those who were formerly held captive by Boko Haram suggest the range of challenges ahead, as well as what might help — and what will not.

The Long Road Back From Boko Haram

Photo: Henry Chukwuedo/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images
Caption: Amina Ali Nkeki, 19, is one of the Nigerian schoolgirls kidnapped by Boko Haram in 2014. She was found last month wandering in the Sambisa Forest, a Boko Haram stronghold, with her 4-month-old baby.

5

DOZENS of heavily armed terrorists rolled into the sleepy little town one night in a convoy of trucks, buses and vans. They made their way to the girls’ boarding school.

The high school girls, asleep in their dormitory, awoke to gunfire. The attackers stormed the school, set it on fire, and, residents said, then herded several hundred terrified girls into the vehicles — and drove off and vanished.

‘Bring Back Our Girls’ http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/04/opinion/sunday/kristof-bring-back-our-girls.html?smid=tw-share&_r=1

#BringBackOurGirls: The Nigerian army has freed 300 women and girls from Boko Haram, but none appear to be the abducted "Chibok girls."

We’re hopeful that this win will lead to freedom for the now infamous girls who were kidnapped a year ago.

LIKE this story to keep the spotlight on the “Chibok girls” until they are found and freed.

Schifo schifo schifo. Riesco a dire solo questo..

Delle studentesse nigeriane sono state rapite da Boko Haram, un noto terrorista. Questo individuo non solo ritiene che le ragazze non debbano avere una formazione, cosa che è assolutamente sbagliata e terribile, ma addirittura le considera come oggetti da violare e da vendere, si da vendere perchè è quello il lsuo intento.. venderle , venderle come un qualsiasi oggetto.. ma dove può arrivare mai la stupidità umana?

Ora tutto il web ha sposato la causa di appoggiare virtualmente tutte queste ragazze, dare speranza e se si può aiutarle.. quindi fai come me.. protestiamo nel nostro piccolo..

Perchè un vero uomo non compra una donna.

#bringbackourgirls

Credits : sapphireofthesouth

2

Did you forget about #BringBackOurGirls? Nigeria — and their parents — haven’t 

Just a few months ago, the kidnapping of nearly 300 Nigerian girls by the terrorist group Boko Haram was a cause célèbre: There was the ubiquitous hashtag (#BringBackOurGirls), celebrity supporters (some misguided) and political pressure from the international community. And then, just like every other viral movement, it faded from public view.

Much like the #Kony2012 campaign, #BringBackOurGirls seemed to highlight the worst of hashtag activism: People’s tendency to jump on a viral bandwagon until the next media-ready cause rolls into town.

This is why hashtag activism needs to get betterFollow micdotcom

Twisting the facts: Michelle Obama version

“This unconscionable act was committed by a terrorist group determined to keep these girls from getting an education — grown men attempting to snuff out the aspirations of young girls…” - Michelle Obama.

Watch the video address here: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2624714/Michelle-Obama-White-Houses-weekly-radio-address-demand-justice-Boko-Haram-kidnap-victims.html

Few key points, among many:

  • “Committed by a terrorist group” - which group? An Islamic terrorist group.
  • “these girls” - which girls? Hmm, forgot to mention these were overwhelmingly Christian girls: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-27348354
  • “a terrorist group determined to keep these girls from getting an education”: Thanks, Michelle Obama, for portraying this as a solely women’s education issue, while masking the Islamic religious terrorism against Christianity issue.

Let’s talk about tolerance.