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Today we’re treated to video proof of something the great Galileo predicted all the way back in the 16th century:

Galileo proposed that a falling body would fall with a uniform acceleration, as long as the resistance of the medium through which it was falling remained negligible, or in the limiting case of its falling through a vacuum.

Physicist Brian Cox visited NASA’s Space Power Facility in Cleveland, Ohio, where they house their Space Simulation Chamber, the world’s largest vacuum chamber, to demonstrate that any two objects dropped in a vacuum will fall at the same rate. Cox and a team of engineers used the vacuum chamger to drop a bowling ball and a bunch of feathers from the same height at the same time. Even though we all know what’s supposed to happen, actually watching happen with your own eyes is truly incredible.

The best thing about this video is the reaction it elicits from Cox and the engineers. Everyone knows how the experiment will end. Like us, they’ve been told what to expect. Like us, many of them have seen it demonstrated on a smaller scale. But something about watching a bowling ball and feathers fall from a great height, together, side by side, makes them gawk, giggle, and grin like children. I think that’s kind of wonderful.

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again, science is super awesome.

[via io9]

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…and the Woman Clothed in Sun (S3E10), Red Dragon, and Manhunter

Lecter felt much better. He thought he might surprise Graham with a call sometime, or if the man couldn’t be civil, he might have a hospital-supply house mail Graham a colostomy bag for old times’ sake.

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You Know How This Experiment Ends, But You Should Watch It Anyway

Most of you know that any two objects dropped in a vacuum will fall at the same rate. Some of you have probably even seen it demonstrated in person. But you’ve never seen this classic experiment reproduced in the world’s biggest vacuum chamber – and you really should.

Physicist Brian Cox recently visited NASA’s Space Power Facility in Ohio to check out the Agency's Space Simulation Chamber. At 30.5 meters across and 37.2 meters tall, the colossal aluminum construction has a volume of 22,653 cubic meters (or about ~800,000 cubic feet), making it the biggest vacuum chamber in the world.

The best thing about this video is the reaction it elicits from Cox and the engineers. Everyone knows how the experiment will end. Like us, they’ve been told what to expect. Like us, many of them have seen it demonstrated on a smaller scale. But something about watching a bowling ball and feathers fall from a great height, together, side by side, makes them gawk, giggle, and grin like children. I think that’s kind of wonderful.

In 2015, a new early warning system called ATLAS (Asteroid Terrestrial Impact Last Alert System) will come online. Eight small telescopes will scan the sky for any sign of faint objects that may pose a threat to the Earth. ATLAS will give up to three week’s warning of an impact, which is enough time to evacuate a large region, but probably not an entire country.

The cost of our global insurance policy? One third of Manchester United’s striker Wayne Rooney.
—  Brian Cox, Human Universe
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After a first look a couple of days ago, here are more images from BBC’s six-part adaptation of Leo Tolstoy’s War and Peace, which offer a first look at Gillian Anderson’s Anna Pavlovna Scherer and Stephen Rea’s Prince Vassily Kuragin.

Led by Paul Dano as Pierre Bezukhov, Lily James as Natasha Rostova and James Norton as Prince Andrei Bolkonsky, the miniseries also stars Jim Broadbent, Brian Cox, Ken Stott, Rebecca Front, Kenneth Cranham, Aneurin Barnard, Tuppence Middleton, Callum Turner, Jessie Buckley, Greta Scacchi, Jack Lowden, Tom Burke and Aisling Loftus.

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“Did you really feel depressed after you shot Mr. Garrett Jacob Hobbes to death? I think that you probably did, but it wasn’t the act that got to you. Didn’t you feel so bad, because killing him felt so good? And why shouldn’t it feel good? It must feel good to God, he does it all the time.”

Manhunter (1986)

Directed by Michael Mann

Cinematography by Dante Spinotti