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Today we’re treated to video proof of something the great Galileo predicted all the way back in the 16th century:

Galileo proposed that a falling body would fall with a uniform acceleration, as long as the resistance of the medium through which it was falling remained negligible, or in the limiting case of its falling through a vacuum.

Physicist Brian Cox visited NASA’s Space Power Facility in Cleveland, Ohio, where they house their Space Simulation Chamber, the world’s largest vacuum chamber, to demonstrate that any two objects dropped in a vacuum will fall at the same rate. Cox and a team of engineers used the vacuum chamger to drop a bowling ball and a bunch of feathers from the same height at the same time. Even though we all know what’s supposed to happen, actually watching happen with your own eyes is truly incredible.

The best thing about this video is the reaction it elicits from Cox and the engineers. Everyone knows how the experiment will end. Like us, they’ve been told what to expect. Like us, many of them have seen it demonstrated on a smaller scale. But something about watching a bowling ball and feathers fall from a great height, together, side by side, makes them gawk, giggle, and grin like children. I think that’s kind of wonderful.

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again, science is super awesome.

[via io9]

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…and the Woman Clothed in Sun (S3E10), Red Dragon, and Manhunter

Lecter felt much better. He thought he might surprise Graham with a call sometime, or if the man couldn’t be civil, he might have a hospital-supply house mail Graham a colostomy bag for old times’ sake.

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You Know How This Experiment Ends, But You Should Watch It Anyway

Most of you know that any two objects dropped in a vacuum will fall at the same rate. Some of you have probably even seen it demonstrated in person. But you’ve never seen this classic experiment reproduced in the world’s biggest vacuum chamber – and you really should.

Physicist Brian Cox recently visited NASA’s Space Power Facility in Ohio to check out the Agency's Space Simulation Chamber. At 30.5 meters across and 37.2 meters tall, the colossal aluminum construction has a volume of 22,653 cubic meters (or about ~800,000 cubic feet), making it the biggest vacuum chamber in the world.

The best thing about this video is the reaction it elicits from Cox and the engineers. Everyone knows how the experiment will end. Like us, they’ve been told what to expect. Like us, many of them have seen it demonstrated on a smaller scale. But something about watching a bowling ball and feathers fall from a great height, together, side by side, makes them gawk, giggle, and grin like children. I think that’s kind of wonderful.

Brian Cox, Martin Freeman join American Hangman

Brian Cox and Martin Freeman will star in American Hangman.

Metro International’s US-based thriller is written and directed by playwright and documentarian Wilson Coneybeare, and centures on a kidnap plot that exploits the dark side of social media.

The Canadian/Irish co-production is being produced by Coneybeare, Meredith Fowler, Jeremy Tebbett and Colin Tebbett for a 2015 release.

Coneybeare commented: “I am thrilled to be able to work with talents as formidable as Martin Freeman and Brian Cox. The two will be together in every scene, playing off one another in a very tense situation, and I think everyone will relish the fireworks created by these two artists at the top of their game.”

More here.