brian masters

Forgive the past. It is over. Learn from it and let go. People are constantly changing and growing. Do not cling to a limited, disconnected, negative image of a person in the past. See that person now. Your relationship is always alive and changing.
—  Brian L. Weiss, Messages from the Masters: Tapping Into the Power of Love
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WHAT IS SHE

Forgive the past. It is over. Learn from it and let go. People are constantly changing and growing. Do not cling to a limited, disconnected, negative image of a person in the past. See that person now. Your relationship is always alive and changing.
—  Brian L. Weiss, Messages from the Masters: Tapping Into the Power of Love

Since this was highly requested by my tumblr/twitter followers, I’m making a list of books that have personally inspired me in one way or the other. You can leave me book suggestions here!! (mostly non-fiction, psychological, self-improvement and history related books) I’ll most likely keep adding to this list, enjoy!!

A New Earth by Eckhart Tolle

Another Country by James Baldwin

Beloved by Toni Morrison

By the River Piedra I Sat Down and Wept by Paulo Coelho

Cane by Jean Toomer

Creative Visualization by Shakti Gawain 

Dream Psychology by Sigmund Freud

Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman 

Getting the Love You Want by Harville Hendrix

Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

Letter to My Daughter by Maya Angelou

Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl

Many Lives, Many Masters by Brian L. Weiss

Needful Things by Stephen King

Outlier by Malcolm Gladwell 

Reinventing the Body, Resurrecting the Soul by Deepak Chopra

Soul to Soul by Gary Zukav

Steal Like an Artist by Austin Kleon

Stillness Speaks by Eckhart Tolle 

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

The Anatomy of Being by Shinji Moon

The Book of the Secrets by Osho

The Coldest Winter Ever by Sister Souljah

The Doors of Perception by Aldous Huxley 

The Egg by Andy Weir

The Heart of a Woman by Maya Angelou

The Miracle of Mindfulness by Thich Nhat Hanh

The Paleo Manifesto by John Durant

The Seat of the Soul by Gary Zukav

The Stranger by Albert Camus

The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell

The Way of Tenderness by Zenju Manuel 

The Way of Zen by Alan Watts  

The Wisdom of Insecurity by Alan Watts

The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene 

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill

Unbought and Unbossed by Shirley Chisholm

Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind by Shunryū Suzuki

1984 by George Orwell 

3

“Dahmer told me that on one occasion he had seen in the newspaper an account of a young man who was killed on a motorcycle and he fell in love with the individual just from the photograph. He actually went to the funeral home to view the corpse but he became so aroused that he excused himself into the bathroom where he masturbated.” - Robert Ressler (x)

My Friend Dahmer by John Backderf

“One day he conceived the idea of finding himself a fresh corpse and scanned the obituary columns in search of a suitable candidate. An eighteen year old boy took his fancy, so he attended the funeral and watched where the body was buried. Late that night, he went to the cemetery with the intention of digging up the corpse and taking it home, but the ground was frozen and would not yield, besides which a dog barked and an owl hooted to frighten him off.” - The Shrine of Jeffrey Dahmer (page 95)

2

Joyce Dahmer’s illness and Jeff’s response

“[Jeff] blamed himself for his mother’s illness. He had known for as long as he could remember that she had been depressed following his birth, and that he had therefore caused the illness. He also must have caused every relapse. He could not articulate his pain,for fear of tipping his mother over the edge again. He had to keep himself to himself, say little and do less, to protect her, to keep a little calm in the house. The more she saw of him the worse it would be for her.

His brother David said, ‘[Jeff] never learned to be open with his feelings of frustration… he went out to the forest by himself and cut down trees for firewood. […] It sounded like vented anger, but it was more likely the solace of utter isolation. Jeff quite simply felt he did not belong, and that if he were to belong he would only do harm”.

-Brian Masters, The Shrine of Jeffrey Dahmer

I like to see people in happiness.
I like to do good.
I love democracy.
I detest any criminal acts.
I like kids.
I like all animals.
I love public and community service.
I hate to see hunger, unemployment, oppression, war, aggression, ignorance, illiteracy, etc.
I was a trade union officer.
I was a good soldier and N.C.O.
I was a fair policeman.
I was an effective civil servant.
STOP. THIS ALL COUNTS FOR NOTHING when I can kill fifteen men (without any reason) and attempt to kill about nine others - in my home and under friendly circumstances.
Am I mad? I don’t feel mad. Maybe I am mad.
—  Dennis Nilsen

Dahmer’s shrine would be his creation, the only one in his entire existence. It would be beautiful, bound by the mystical absolutes of symmetry (as his drawing shows), and it would be his ultimate exercise in control. He knew all about the beauty of things, and nothing whatever of the love which gave them life. Sitting before the table, alone with his relics, he would have control over his life at last, over sex, the world, the past, power through the absolute beauty of death. Those he had killed would be there with him, twelve skulls in front, the skeletons of Lacy and Miller at each side. They were not wasted. He had kept something of them. They were now his companions in the world of the spirit, which that vast uncomprehending and hostile world outside could not touch. He had been chained to that world, an unwilling guest among its horrible disorder. Here before his shrine he would be free at last. Somebody asked, What was it a shrine to? ‘Myself,’ he said. The self which diverted, the aberrant self. Shockingly, it would be the only place on earth where he could feel his own kind of comfort and ease, for nowhere else would he fit. ‘If this had happened six months later, that’s what they would have found.’ In the company of flickering lights, incense, ghosts, and silent comforting eyeless grinning skulls? Jeff Dahmer would finally be in peace. It was ‘a place where I could feel at home’. - The Shrine Of Jeffrey Dahmer, Brian Masters

“I was completely swept along with my own compulsion. I don’t know how else to put it. It didn’t satisfy me completely so maybe I was thinking another one [murder] will. Maybe this one will, and the numbers started growing and growing and just got out of control, as you can see.”

-Jeffrey Dahmer

The paradox is that Dahmer sought to control his world and the individuals who blundered into it, but was all the time controlled by it. (The Shrine of Jeffrey Dahmer)