witchy thing to do right now

pick a colour

close your eyes

take a slow deep breath in

breathe in white light coming in through your skull, face, forehead, nostrils, mouth, eyes, ears

the white light is filling your lungs like a cup being filled with crystal clear water

hold it there for a second and feel it’s power

now breathe out a misty cloud of your colour. feel it surround your head and then shoulders and then body. breathe it out into your aura or energy field.

do this as many times as you need to feel awesome + charged

<3 u all

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Rainbows in the mist from whales, off Laguna Beach, California - @erubes1

Breathe. You’re going to be okay. Breathe and remember that you’ve been in this place before. You’ve been this uncomfortable and anxious and scared, and you’ve survived. Breathe and know that you can survive this too. These feelings can’t break you. They’re painful and debilitating, but you can sit with them and eventually, they will pass. Maybe not immediately, but sometime soon, they are going to fade and when they do, you’ll look back at this moment and laugh for having doubted your resilience. I know it feels unbearable right now, but keep breathing, again and again. This will pass. I promise it will pass.
—  Daniell Koepke (via @wizdomly)
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Missy Hart grew up in Redwood City, Calif. — in gangs, on the street, in the foster care system and in institutions.

“Where I’m from,” the 26-year-old says, “you’re constantly in alert mode, like fight or flight.”

But at age 13, when she was incarcerated in juvenile hall for using marijuana, she found herself closing her eyes and letting her guard down in a room full of rival gang members.

Back then, she says, yoga was just another mandatory activity, run by a Bay Area program called The Art of Yoga Project. It offers what it calls “trauma-sensitive yoga” to incarcerated girls.

At first, 13-year-old Hart felt uncomfortable. But, gradually, she learned to use the poses and breathing to relax, and she loved it.

The Role Of Yoga In Healing Trauma

Illustration: LA Johnson/NPR