break the bank

Being poor is just a series of emergencies.

Emergencies really do crop up more often for poor people. Necessities, like vacuum cleaners or phones or bedding or shoes, need replacement or repair more often when you only buy the cheapest possible option.

Poor people’s health tends to be compromised by cheap, unhealthy food; stress; being around lots of similarly-poor contagious sick people who can’t afford to stay home or get treatment; inadequate healthcare; and often, hazardous and/or demanding work conditions – including longer hours allowing less time for sleep, home food prep, and mental or physical exercise.

Our homes may not offer much respite, as we’re less likely to have comfortable furniture for sleep or relaxation, more likely to be forced to rely on abusive people for financial reasons.  We’re also more likely to live in high-pollution areas, food deserts, and in poorly-maintained rental housing. We’re less likely to have access to heat or cooling even in dangerous weather.

For all these reasons and more, we get sick more, and when we do, we have less access to medical care – even the poor people lucky enough to have adequate insurance and a doctor who will provide appropriate care without discrimination may face significant difficulties getting to and from a doctor and pharmacy.

Poor people have less reliable transportation; any cars that are affordable for a poor person will usually need major repairs at least a couple times a year - more emergencies! - and poor people are less likely to live anywhere near an adequate public transit system. Just the cab fare to and from a doctor visit can easily cost a week’s worth of groceries or more. Ignoring medical needs as long as possible and not accessing preventative care causes massive future expense.

Many people are poor specifically because of disability, making work difficult or impossible in addition to the expenses of managing chronic illness, accessing mobility aids, or other costs associated with disability.

Poverty runs in families, and friend groups are often based heavily on class in our stratified society, so in addition to your own emergencies as a poor person, you’ll likely also be sharing resources to keep your loved ones alive. You’re not likely to have wealthier friends or family who can or will help.

Poor people are less likely to have enough clothing that we can wait to replace unwearable items. Because our clothing collections are smaller (and often secondhand and/or poorly made), our clothes wear out faster. Not having clothing that marks us as ‘respectable’ can bar us from employment, make us more vulnerable to violence from police or other harassers, and make resources like social programmes less accessible.

Overdraft fees target poor people specifically. Being a few pennies off in your maths can mean sudden huge bills that compound themselves. Predatory banks routinely run all charges before processing the deposits you make earlier in the day or week, which can mean huge overdraft fees can happen even if you deposit your money hours or days before trying to spend any of it.

There are thousands of examples. For poor people, unexpected expenses happen more often. And when you’re poor, any unexpected expense can be an emergency with serious consequences.

Even the cheapest (most temporary) solution for an emergency often breaks the bank.  People who aren’t poor don’t realize that an urgent expense of thirty dollars can mean not eating for a week. Poor people who try to save find our savings slipping away as emergency after emergency happens. Some poor people turn to predatory lending companies, not because they don’t know it’s a bad deal but because being hugely in debt tomorrow is better than your kids starving today.

I don’t think people who’ve never been poor realise what it’s like. It’s not that we’re terrible at budgeting, it’s that even the most perfect budget breaks under the weight of the basic maths: we do not have enough resources.

Cos we’re fucking poor.

Here’s How to Eat Vegan for a Week For Under $50

Some of the most affordable foods on the planet are vegan, including rice, beans, legumes, pasta, and all kinds of fruits and veggies. Despite this, people will often ask us about eating vegan on a budget.

So we’ve compiled some handy tips and tricks that will keep you veg without breaking the bank:

Dry beans are worth the wait.
Sure, you have to soak them overnight, but dry beans are exponentially cheaper than canned. They’re also a delicious, protein-packed essential in a budget-friendly vegan diet.

Buy it frozen.
One great way to save money is to reduce food waste. Frozen veggies like corn, peas, and green beans are great because they last almost forever.

Get into oatmeal.
Yeah, oatmeal is a super secret vegan hack. It’s filling, loaded with iron and calcium, and one of the cheapest things you could eat for breakfast.

Stick with produce under $2 per pound.
When choosing fresh fruits and veggies, try to stick with items under $2/lb.

If you want to splurge, buy some Vegenaise.
Of course you can just use it like mayo, but you can also create sour cream (just add lemon juice), salad dressings, and sauces with this must-have specialty item.

Soup is a thing.
Soups loaded with veggies, grains, and beans hold well as leftovers, stretch your dollars, and make great filling meals!

Stick with staples.
Rice, pasta, and peanut butter are all great choices for affordability and versatility.

Every night can be taco night.
Put those tasty veggies and beans to use inside a toasted tortilla! Add some Vegenaise sour cream and you’ve got yourself a tasty and inexpensive vegan dinner.

My Reward System

Okay. So. Whether you’re a little without a CG or a CG who has no idea how to care for a little, odds are you’ve at some point had trouble figuring out a point system that works! This is the one I used when I was a little and may use again when I find a little!

There are a few categories. Each category allows you to earn a certain number of points.

Sleeping:
8+ hours = 10 points
7-6 hours = 8 points
5 hours = 5 points
4 hours = 2 points
-4 = 0 points

Eating: (Note: To be considered a meal there has to be some sort of veggie, grain, and protein!)
Ate 3 meals = 10 points
Ate 2 meals = 5 points
Ate 1 meal = 2 points

Drinking Water
8 glasses = 10 points
7-6 glasses = 8 points
5 glasses = 5 points
4 glasses = 2 points
-4 glasses = 1 point
0 glasses = 0 points

Other: (This category should be tailored to fit you individually! I’ll include mine as an example though.)
Did homework = 8 points
Room was clean at the end of the day = 5 points
Showered = 1 point
Washed face twice = 3 points
Brushed teeth twice = 3 points
Exercised or danced = 3 points
Read a chapter of a book = 1 point per chapter

You’re supposed to aim for a certain number of points a day. Like, 30 points is good, but 40 points is great! If you reach that, you can cash it in for small treats, or you can go the extra mile and get 250-300 points total for the week!

Rewards:
Extra desert = 40 points
Pack of stickers = 40 points
New stuffie = 100 points
New coloring book = 100 points
New onsie/diaper/binkie= 300 points

The points for the rewards are set really high so that rewards still feel special, and you don’t have to break the bank, haha.

I hope this helps someone out there! Best wishes!

songsandeyeglasses  asked:

How do you redecorate without breaking your fragile bank account??

I love this question! Everything on this list is under $30, and most of it can be purchased from the safety of your dorm room couch.

Decorating on a Budget

1. Plants: Plants are my personal favorite decor (apart from Xmas lights). They’re inexpensive and look great in any location. If watering a plant every day doesn’t work for your schedule, get a cactus! I water my cacti twice a week.

2. Xmas Lights: I try to distance myself from people who say that Xmas lights are just “seasonal”. I have three different strands of lights up all year long, one in each room and one on my outdoor balcony. These lights are perfect for parties, romantic evenings, etc. 

3. Candles/Incense: Dorm room or apartment landlord permitting, candles and incense really help an apartment feel more homey. They also help stave off the smell of your cat’s litter box, which is always a plus.

4. Posters: Posters aren’t as expensive as you think they are, but poster frames are ridiculously expensive. And you can’t buy the cheap ones, they fall apart instantly- you have to buy the $40 ones. My advice to you, buy posters and hang them up carefully with pushpins or tape.

5. Clocks: Buy a cool clock off Society6 or RedBubble for $25. It’s my belief that the right clock can help brighten up an otherwise dull-looking room. I bought my boyfriend this Bob’s Burgers clock for his birthday last year.

6. Shower: You don’t need to use the low-grade weak shower head that came with your bathroom. You can buy color changing shower heads and spa quality shower heads on Amazon for $25. Go forth! Always keep your old shower head somewhere safe, and put it back on when you’re ready to move out. There are lots of great and truly unique shower curtains out there on the internet, but they’re expensive. You’re better off buying one from Target or Walmart.

7. Night lights: I am the sort of person who always needs to pee at 3am. I have always used night lights in my bathroom and kitchen because they’re so much better than blundering around in the dark. Similar to the Xmas lights, they help create that “mood”. I have these cute little lava lamp night lights.

8. Glow in the dark stars: Just trust me on this.

9. Chalkboard paint: Dorm room or apartment landlord permitting, chalkboard paint can help turn your room into a perpetual canvas. A friend of mine from college did this to his incredibly small room, and it looked so good.

10. Beaded curtain: Beaded curtains help make small spaces appear larger. We have a beaded curtain hanging in our hallway currently, and it’s great. You don’t need a super expensive one that was handmade by the indigenous people of wherever. Just a simple one to put in a doorway or hang on the wall to change your space.

If You’re Buying Lezhin Coins in English, You Need to Stop.

Bold title, I know, but honestly I just need to save as many people (or bank accounts) as possible because apparently not many people (that I know of) know this fact: You’ll get more coins if you buy it in the Korean version of the app. That’s right, I said it. So let me break this down to you.

(Since I currently live in Japan the prices are in yen but the concept is basically the same wherever you are so whatever)

If I use the English version of Lezhin app, the coin prices that would come up would be like this:

¥600 - 17 coins
¥1,200 - 36 coins + 10 points
¥2,400 - 75 coins + 30 points
¥3,600 - 115 coins + 50 points
¥6,000- 200 coins + 100 points
¥11,800 - 405 coins + 300 points
¥17,800 - 620 coins + 500 points

But, if I use the Korean version of the app, it would be like this:

¥480 - 23 coins 
¥1,200 - 65 coins
¥2,400 - 131 coins + 50 points
¥4,800 - 281 coins + 100 points
¥8,400 - 521 coins + 300 points
¥11,800 - 751 coins + 500 points

Wow, would you look at that… Isn’t that crazy? Just switch the language and BOOM, look at all the money that you can save (or could’ve saved, I’m sorry for your loss). And yes, you can use those coins to buy English chapters too. Honestly, the first time I knew about this, I felt so betrayed and robbed, but now I want to help as many people as possible to continue reading their favorite manhwas legally and supporting their favorite artists without breaking their bank. So please, reblog and spread this message, and just know, that we can make our bank accounts great again.