braves nation

Started going through my head right after I saw the election results last week…

Be brave and be kind.

-The National, “Baby, We’ll Be Fine”

Kuretake brush pen, Winsor & Newton alcohol markers, stencil, and Micron pens on an atlas page.

I think we need to repeat the simple things that are important to remember over and over.

Be brave and be kind. -The National, “Baby, We’ll Be Fine”

Stencils, homemade acrylic spray ink, white Sharpie waterbased paint pen, and… I can’t remember what I used for the black writing. D’oh!

huffingtonpost.com
The Forgotten History Of 'Violent Displacement' That Helped Create The National Parks
Tuesday marked the 99th anniversary of the National Park Service, perhaps the most-loved division of the federal government. For many Americans, excursions to the national parks conjure up memories of excursions to the national parks conjure up memories of family road trips, camp songs and hikes set in some of the country's most beautiful locales. Ken Burns called the parks, "America’s best idea." Cue Woody Guthrie: "This Land Is Your Land."
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March 16th 1912: Lawrence Oates dies

On this day in 1912 Lawrence Oates, a member of Robert Falcon Scott’s British team to the South Pole, left his tent never to be seen again. Scott’s Terra Nova Expedition was his second attempt and aimed to become the first group to reach the South Pole. The group succeeded in reaching the Pole on January 17th 1912, only to discover that they had been beaten by Roald Amundsen’s Norwegian expedition. Sadly, Scott’s entire party of five men died on the return journey. Oates was one of those who died first. He was suffering from severe frostbite and, in an apparent act of self-sacrifice, simply walked out of his tent into a blizzard. He had asked them to leave him behind as his condition worsened, and it is likely he felt that he was holding his group back and limiting their chances for survival. Thus on March 16th he walked out of the tent saying: “I am just going outside and may be some time.” The others died soon after and their bodies were found by a search party in November, along with some of their equipment and personal effects. Oates’s body was never found, but he and his companions are remembered as brave men and national heroes.

“We knew that poor Oates was walking to his death, but though we tried to dissuade him, we knew it was the act of a brave man and an English gentleman.
- Entry in Scott’s diary about Oates

{ sweet solace }

pairing: george washington x reader

time period: 1700s/revolutionary era

prompt: “a fluffy one with gwash (maybe he’s sick or he has a ptsd episode or he’s just really tired) where he finally lets the reader take care of him”

trigger warnings: hints at the general having a ptsd episode.


Your husband was the general of the Continental Army, and you couldn’t have been prouder to be married to him. He was a fine man who so bravely fought for this nation ever since he was a teenager. Now, they fought for a greater cause–independence for the colonies. 

He’d written you all throughout the war, giving you updates and expressing his fears to you in his letters. You saw a side of the General that few had seen, a side that was often tucked away or thrown aside, for when the men were afraid, your husband had to be the brave one. When he was afraid, you saw it as your job to hold him together. That you did.

It wasn’t long before your husband wrote his last letter to you that said he was on his way home. You reread the letter over and over again, longing for the day that he’d be at your door. The day finally came when the quiet knock came on your door, and you pulled it back to see your husband. 

He looked regal as he wore his cape over his shoulders. His hat was still on his head. His gun was on his back along with the little things he had taken with him to the battlefield. He looked exhausted, but he slowly lowered his hat and smiled up at you as he placed it over his heart. 

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TRUE RELIC OF THE CIVIL WAR IN INDIAN TERRITORY:
STAND WATIE’S CHEROKEE BRAVES FLAG

This flag was carried by Colonel Stand Watie’s Cherokee Mounted Rifles; the body of the flag is the First National pattern flag of the Confederate States; the canton is blue with eleven white stars in a circle, surrounding five red stars representing the Five Civilized Tribes (Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw and Seminole); the large red star in the center represents the Cherokee Nation. “Cherokee Braves” is lettered in red in the center of the white stripe.

The 1st Cherokee Mounted Rifles was organized in July 1861, under the command of Colonel John Drew, and consisted of full-blood Cherokees. The 2nd Cherokee Mounted Rifles was organized under the command of Colonel Stand Waite, and consisted of Cherokees of mixed blood. A portion of Drew’s regiment deserted in late 1861; the majority of the remainder deserted following the Confederate defeat at the Battle of Fort Wayne in October 1862.

The remaining members of Drew’s regiment combined with Waite’s and were reorganized as the 1st Regiment Cherokee Mounted Rifles; during the Civil War Waite’s regiment participated in twenty-seven major engagements and numerous skirmishes. Most of his activities utilized guerilla warfare tactics.

The flag was one of two captured by Lieutenant David Whittaker of Company B, 10th Regiment Kansas Volunteer Infantry at Locust Grove, Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory, on July 3, 1862.

Following the Battle of Locust Grove, Lieutenant Whittaker continued his military career, serving as provost marshal for the 1st Division of the Army of the Frontier and in St. Louis, Missouri. While in St. Louis, he was a member of a Board of Officers that examined and reported upon the qualifications of applicants for appointment as commissioned officers of colored troops. He was mustered out of service on August 19, 1864 at the expiration of his enlistment.

Returning to Doniphan County, Kansas, Whittaker was elected to the Kansas legislature in 1869 and re-elected the following year. In March 1869 he was appointed one of the commissioners to audit civilian claims from the 1864 Price Raid. In 1870 Whittaker was appointed adjutant general of Kansas and confirmed by the Kansas Senate with the rank of colonel. He served in that capacity during Governor James Harvey’s term of office. David Whittaker died on September 6, 1904 at Topeka, Kansas.

Image Courtesy Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield; WICR 30118
info courtesy: Civil War Virtual Museum

Lying about Vietnam: it was now a Washington way of life.  The lies started with the war’s ontological premise.  We were supposed to be defending a ‘country’ called “South Vietnam.’  But South Vietnam was not quite a country at all.  Vietnamese independence fighters had begun battling the French since practically the day they stopped fighting side by side in World War II.  In 1954 they fought their colonial overlords to a final defeat at the stronghold of Dien Bien Phu.  It was the first military loss for a European colonial power in three hundred years.  Though these stalwarts, the Vietminh, now controlled four-fifths of the country’s territory, at the peace conference in Geneva they made a concession: they agreed to administer an armistice area half that size, demarcated at the seventeenth parallel (but for some last-minute haggling, it would have been the eighteenth).  A government loyal to the French would administer the lands to the south.  The ad hoc demarcation was to last twenty-four months, at which time the winner of an internationally supervised election in 1956 would run the entire country.
Instead, the division lasted for nineteen years.  The reason was the United Sates, which saw to it the reunification election never took place.  American intelligence knew that Ho Chi Minh, the Communist leader of the independence fighters, would have won 80 percent of the vote.  The seventeenth parallel was read backward as an ordinary international boundary.  If 'North Vietnam’ crossed it, they’d be guilty of 'aggression.’  Meanwhile, the CIA launched a propaganda campaign to depopulate North Vietnam, whose sizable Catholic population was shipped to 'South Vietnam’ via the U.S. Seventh Fleet.  There, they found themselves part of a citizenry that had no reason for being in history, culture, or geography; even as the U.S. pretended- then came to believe- they were a brave, independence-loving nation of long standing.  Actually the great city in the South, Saigon, had been France’s imperial headquarters.  There, France had crowned a figurehead emperor at the tender age of twelve.  During World War II, Emperor Bao Dai had collaborated with Vichy France and the Japanese.  This was the man the South Vietnamese were supposed to venerate as the leader of their independent nation.
He was replaced by someone worse: a wily hustler named Ngo Dinh Diem.  In 1952, Diem engineered a presidential election between himself and the emperor, with the help of U.S. government advisers, and 'won’ 98.2 percent of the vote.  He then revived the guillotine as punishment for anyone 'infringing upon the security of the state.’  His favorite rebuff to an insult from a political opponent was 'Shoot him dead!’  His sister-in-law Madame Nhu, who served as his emissary abroad, told Americans the last thing her family was interested in was 'your crazy freedoms.’  This was the government to which the United States would now ask its citizens to pledge their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor.  Diem was not a Communist.  And that, said America, made him a democrat.
Ho Chi Minh had no special beef with the United States.  He liked to quote the Declaration of Independence; on the march to Hanoi during World War II, his forces called themselves the Viet-American Army; after the war, Ho sent telegrams to President Truman offering an independent Vietnam as 'a fertile field for American capital and enterprise.’  (Truman never answered.)  The French reconquered Vietnam with what was practically an American mercenary force: 78 percent of the French army’s funding came from the United States.  More hawkish Americans lobbied for direct intervention; Richard Nixon, after his visit in 1953, advised Eisenhower that two or three atomic bombs would do the trick.  Ho Chi Minh’s supporters in South Vietnam began their guerrilla war in 1960.  It led to a kind of Cold War nervous breakdown.  Falter in Vietnam, Lyndon Johnson claimed in 1964, and 'they may just chase you into your own kitchen.
—  Rick Perlstein, Nixonland, pgs 100-101