brattleboro

     “We couldn’t have a general strike in this country if we tried because it’s everyone for themselves. Everybody’s just comfortable enough, just frightened enough…and in a lot of cases, just ignorant enough. It’s always someone else’s problem.”

     Brattleboro, VT

     “I teach math to children with learning disabilities, and it helps me look at everything with an open mind, including big questions like racism and sexism. I have to approach and present math problems in a new way, so it makes me question my assumptions about everything I think I know: Why have I always thought a certain way? What if I try to do this differently?”
     “How did you decide to get into this field?”
     “One time, I wanted to help a girl with a learning disability. She said, ‘You can try, but it’s not going to work.’ An hour later she was saying, ‘This is so easy!’ I thought, ‘Hmm, I can do this.’”

     Brattleboro, VT

Downtown Brattleboro, Vermont, a city of 12,000 residents, succumbs to floodwaters caused by Tropical Storm Irene.  Montpelier, the capital, faces a flood threat from the confluence of rivers in the area – rivers which could crest at 20 feet – as well as the possibility of an intentional release of water to alleviate pressure on the earthen Mashfield Dam, four hours upstream.  At least one resident is confirmed dead.  (Photo: Zach McLaughlin / WCAX)

     “My paintings are very limited-palette: lots of grays, quiet, spare, tonal, and very emotional. I think if I weren’t an American—if I were from Mexico or Ecuador or Costa Rica—everybody would understand them. But because I’m American, no one understands them. The thing about American art at the moment is that if you’re showing any kind of emotion, you have to be ironic, or to do it from a cynical standpoint.”
     “How does that make you feel?”
     “Frustrated, and sad. Americans in general clamp down their emotions and what they want to do in life. It’s a repressed society.”

     Brattleboro, VT

For the past fifteen months we have been very fortunate to run part of our business out of this old Cotton Mill along the Connecticut River in Brattleboro. We shared hallways and advice from granola makers, jam makers, pie bakers, sign makers and tons of artisans. We come away rich with friends that have helped us flourish and grow. Now the time has come though & we have rented a big truck and are moving our caramel wrapping & packing & shipping back up to Townshend to a former stuffed animal factory at the bottom of our hill. While we are sad to lose such good neighbors, it will be very thrilling indeed to have the goats, the caramel making and the shop so much closer together (and in much more space!). It is an exciting time for us here at the farm, so stay tuned!